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26 Peace Monuments Related to
Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11)

Right click image to enlarge.
1969 - "The Sphere" (World Peace Monument), Battery Park, New York City, New York (USA). Designed by Fritz Koenig of Germany. Commissioned by Port Authority of New York & New Jersey to symbolize world peace through world trade. Stood in the plaza between the two World Trade Center (WTC) towers. Damaged on September 11, 2001. Left unrepaired & moved to Battery Park as a memorial to victims of 9/11. September 11, 2002, "Mayor Michael Bloomberg joined Afghan President Hamid Karzai & officials from about 90 foreign nations at its base to light an eternal flame. Nearly a decade later, the flame could possibly be snuffed out, and there is no permanent plan for the 25-foot-high structure made of bronze & steel. Officials said [in early April 2012] that it will be removed by the end of the month to make way for renovations to Battery Park. Some family members of those killed have gathered thousands of signatures in an online petition urging officials to incorporate the sculpture into the 9/11 memorial & return it to the spot where it once stood as a centerpiece of a 5-acre plaza."


2001 - Monument to Peace, Demre (Turkey). By Russian artist Gregory Pototsky. "Height, 6 meters, in marble & wood). "A prediction monument. Precisely reflects the twin-towers in New York. This monument became the main object for the film, which was made in the same year. This monument was certainly received rather timidly at first by the people of Turkey, but soon came to understand it's simple sculptural meditation on eternity. This piece was one of the few orders received by the painter/sculptor with absolutely no pre conception or suggestive guidance; he thus had total freedom to create, uncensored, an genius masterpiece in simplicity, courage & absolute art mastery."

September 9, 2001 - Peace Plaza, Tenafly, New Jersey (USA). "Dedicated to world peace just two days before 9/11. Also dedicated to the memory of former Borough Administrator Robert Miller & his wife Elizabeth, both killed in the TWA Flight 800 crash off Long Island in July 1996. Mayor Ann Moscovitz designed the blue granite mural that adorns the plaza & created the quote expressing hope for world peace. At the dedication, which was attended by borough residents, officials & two UN representatives, the ambassador of Hungary warned that America was not immune to terrorism, Moscovitz recalled. 'He said, "You don't realize how you are viewed by the world. The US is going to be the object of terror." Two days later, we were,' Moscovitz said. Four people from Tenafly were killed in the attack on the World Trade Center. A plaque was erected to commemorate their lives & the plaza became, in effect, a combined TWA Flight 800/September 11 Memorial. In the ensuing days, people came from the surrounding area to the plaza with candles. 'They wanted someone to go to, like a support group. So a lot of them came spontaneously to our plaza to share their grief,' Moscovitz said."


2001 - Temporary Monument, Shanksville, Pennsylvania (USA). For victims of Flight 93 which crashed in a field near Shanksville on September 11, 2001.

2001 - Bruderhof Peace Barn, Spring Valley Bruderhof, Farmington, Pennsylvania (USA). "Two days after 9/11/2001, the 5th through 8th grade students of the Spring Valley Bruderhof School wanted to do something for peace. They decided to convert an old barn into a museum for peace and a memorial for the victims of terrorism and war. In addition they have handcrafted memorial benches for each passenger and crew member of Flight 93, which are at the crash site in Shanksville, Pennsylvania." Closed after a few years?


November 11, 2001 - Wall of Nations Memorial, Ground Zero, New York City, New York (USA). Commemorates 83 countries (in blue on map) whose citizens were lost in the attack on the World Trade Center (WTC). Left image shows President George W. Bush & UN Secretary General Kofi Annan at the wall.


November 11, 2001 - Ring of Peace, First United Methodist Church, Beech & 2nd Streets, Casper, Wyoming (USA). By Chris Navarro. "You may remember that Matthew Shepherd, a young gay man, was murdered by homophobes in Laramie, Wyoming, in the late 1990s. There's nothing in Laramie to commemorate him, but if you visit the website his parents created, they recommend you see a statue called the Ring of Peace in Casper, that's dedicated first to Matthew, and also to the victims of the Columbine shootings [and 9/11]... a nice idea, but it's just sad how run down and crappy it looks. It was possible for me to take a nice picture of it, but only if I was very careful to crop out almost all the surroundings."


March 11, 2002 - "The Sphere" (World Peace Monument), Battery Park, New York City, New York (USA). Made in Bravaria (Germany) by Fritz Koenig. Erected in 1969 between the two World Trade Center (WTC) towers to symbolize world peace through world trade. Damaged on September 11, 2001. Left unrepaired but moved to become a memorial to the victims of the attack. Eternal flame ignited September 11, 2002.


June 9, 2002 - Twin Towers (9/11 Sculpture), American Museum of Science & Energy (AMSE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). 13-foot scale model of the twin towers at World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City welded from scrap metal by Alex Limor of Limor Steel in Nashville. Photo by EWL.

September 11, 2002 - 9/11 Memorial, Oak Ridge High School (ORHS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). "The memorial originally dedicated by ORHS students on Sept. 11, 2002, will be rededicated this Sept. 11, 2009, according to ORHS history teacher Ken Senter. /// Click here for more information. And click here for more information.


September 11, 2002 - "Bell of Hope," Trinity Church, 79 Broadway (at Wall Street), New York City, New York (USA). Inscribed, "To the greater glory of God and in recognition of the enduring links between the City of London and the city of New York." Cast July 26, 2002, by Whitechapel Bell Foundry which cast the Liberty Bell in 1752. Weighs 294.84 kilograms.


Started in 2002 - World Peace Monument, Great American Flea Market, Tulsa, Oklahoma (USA). Being constructed by Richard L. Branaman out of bowling balls (as his response to 9/11). As of April 2007, he had collected 849 balls & still needed another 7,586 to build a 21-foot pyramid which he will perch atop a three-legged, 77-foot-tall cement structure to be placed in the middle of the Mingo Road & Admiral Boulevard traffic circle (once part of historic Route 66). According to Branaman, "the World Peace Monument is non-denominational, multi-racial and is not a political statement." Click here for an update as of November 2010.

September 11, 2003 - Peace Bell, Veterans Park, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey (USA). Community response to the terrorist attack in nearby New York City on September 11, 2001. Uses a 19th century church bell purchased from a dealer in Brooklyn, Michigan. Otherwise, remarkably similar to Japanese peace bells such as the 1954 bell at United Nations headquarters in New York City.


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September 11, 2003 - "One World United for Peace," Town Common, Norfolk, Massachusetts (USA). September 11th Memorial. Sculpted by Michael Alfano. Bronze & granite 78"x30"x30". "The sculpture's shape implies that of the World Trade Center. Thirteen figures atop the tower surround & support a globe, symbolizing that peace requires people from around the world to draw together. The sculpture rests on a five-sided base, representing the Pentagon, & the '93' on the firefighter's hat symbolizes the flight number of the hijacked plane that crashed in Pennsylvania. In 2006, the town of Clifton, New Jersey, permanently installed the 9/11 memorial at their Arts Center."

September 13, 2003 - Memorial Garden, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (USA). Garden memorializes 13 Princeton alumni who were killed on 9/11. Bell at the garden entrance is from "Remembrance" by Japanese-American artist Toshiko Takaezu [b.1922], a Japanese-American "ceramist, weaver and painter who retired from Princeton in 1992 after teaching for a quarter of a century in our Visual Arts program."


September 11, 2003 - "Freedom Isn't Free," between the DuPage River and the Municipal Center, Napierville, Illinois (USA). Dedicated to the "memory of Commander Dan F. Shanower and the thousands of others who died in the attack." One inscription: "Wall of Faces. Faces created by Naperville school children and molded by local artists to represent the casualties of September 11, 2001."

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Date? - Appleton Peace Park, Appleton, Newfoundland (Canada). "On Sept. 11, 2001, when the United States abruptly closed its airspace, Gander became a safe harbor for 38 international aircraft, 6,700 passengers and crew, 17 dogs & cats, and a pair of great apes. A town of 10,000, with only 550 hotel rooms, Gander took in 4,800 people, outlying towns took thousands more. From their closets & kitchens, the Newfoundlanders provided blankets & towels, sandwiches & stews for the shelters. They invited passengers home to wash up or sleep... About 100 passengers from 14 countries were cared for in Appleton & in nearby Glenwood... The peace park was kick started with more than $5,000 donated by stranded passengers. A seven-metre long beam from the Twin Towers" in New York City was added in September 2013.


September 11, 2005 - Peace Garden, St. Anthony of Padua Church, Falls Church, Virginia (USA). "Eleven Peace Poles create a dramatic entrance into the sacred space. Christian & Muslim faith communities, as well as public and private schools, helped create the unique poles crafted of various media. Incorporated into their design are symbols of peace from many different cultures." One of 100 "sacred spaces" created by the TKF Foundation 1996-2008.


September 11, 2006 - "To the Struggle Against World Terrorism," Bayonne, New Jersey (USA). Also known as the Tear of Grief & the Tear Drop Memorial. "...opened to the anthems of Russia & the USA. On the bank of the Hudson River [facing the Statue of Liberty & Lower Manhattan], is a split 30-meter bronze plate with a giant tear made of titanium. The names of almost 3 thousand people killed on September, 11, 2001, are engraved on the monument. ...gift of Russian people, so sculptor Zurab Tsereteli who also and his colleagues took all the expenses on its erection up [sic]." Tsereteli also sculpted the statue of Good Defeats Evil (qv) at UN headquarters in 1990.

2001 - "Stronger Than Death," Semipalatinsk City (Kazakhstan). A memorial to the victims of Semipalatinsk nuclear tests (150-km west of Semipalatinsk City). "From 1949 until 1989 the Soviet Union conducted 456 nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Test Site. Experiments were conducted on the surface, underground & in the air, with 116 of these being atmospheric tests. Occasional mishaps resulted in dispersion of radioactive materials & leakage of radioactive gases into the environment. Sometimes, residents of nearby villages were warned when an explosion was scheduled. They were advised to stay outside during the blast, since it could topple their houses... Cases of cancer, impotency, leukemia & birth defects skyrocketed within a few years. Babies were born with severe neurological & major bone deformations, some without limbs..." /// Compare "Grief Tear" in New Jersey (USA).

September 11, 2008 - Pentagon Memorial, The Pentagon, Department of Defense, Arlington, Virginia (USA). A permanent outdoor memorial to the 184 people killed in the building and on American Airlines Flight 77 in the September 11, 2001 attacks. Click here for the Wikipedia article.

September 26, 2008 - Garden of Healing, Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Garden, Staten Island, New York City, New York (USA). "One-acre garden, with a path that encircles the nearby 9/11 World Trade Center Educational Tribute Building, features saplings from a pear tree that was rescued from ground zero by workers from the city Parks Department, a Celtic cross, and a Wall of Remembrance depicting individual victims. It overlooks 20 acres of wetlands."

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2011 - "A Place of Remembrance: Official Book of the National September 11 Memorial" By Allison Blais & Lynn Rasic, National Geographic Society (NGS), Washington, DC (USA), pp. 228.


September 11, 2011 - National September 11 Memorial & Museum, New York City, New York (USA). "Displays the names of the 2,982 men, women & children killed in the 9/11 attacks - in New York, Pennsylvania & at the Pentagon - and in the February 26, 1993, World Trade Center bombing." At the World Trade Center site." EWL visited 13Jun11.


September 11, 2011 - Peace [After 9/11] Memorial Sculpture, Battersea Park, London (England). "Made from 30 foot pieces of World Trade Center steel for the 10 Year Anniversary of September 11." "Brooklyn artist Miya Ando was commissioned to create a September 11th monument for London."

2012 - Batavia International Peace Garden, Holland Land Office Museum, Main Street, Batavia, New York (USA). "Sunday [September 11, 2011] was a day of sadness & celebration in Batavia. Americans & a representative of the government of Canada gathered to remember the nearly 3,000 people who died on September 11, 2001. Americans & their Canadian friend also participated in groundbreaking for the Batavia International Peace Garden. Marta Moszczenska, consul general of the Canadian Consulate in Buffalo, was keynote speaker for the day. Moszczenska said the Peace Garden is a symbol of the 'legacy of peace' between America & Canada. The garden is slated for dedication in 2012."

September 10, 2015 - Visitors Center, Flight 93 National Memorial, Shanksville, Pennsylvania (USA). At site of impact of one of four aircraft hijacked by Al-Qaeda terrorists on September 11, 2001. "The visitor center includes a seating chart showing where the passengers & hijackers had begun the flight & also features audio of last phone calls to loved ones made by two passengers & a flight attendant before they tried to retake the plane. Another exhibit presents the view from the rear cabin of a Boeing 757, an attempt to show what the cabin looked like from the passengers' perspective. Officials trying to restore the crash site, which also contains a former mine, have planted memorial groves. They hope to build a 93-foot tower containing 40 wind chimes in 2017."


March 6, 2016 - Transportation Hub, World Trade Center (WTC), New York City, New York (USA). Also called the "Oculus." "This 150-foot-tall winged creation [said to resemble a peace dove] is the work of Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. It serves as a connector between the subway lines, the PATH trains & the ferry terminal in Battery Park City. Its centerpiece is a skylight set to open every September 11. It also features a public plaza, set to open when 3WTC is completed. The Oculus has been plagued by years of delays, design cutbacks, cost overruns & roof leaks; it eventually cost $4.4 billion."

Please email your comments & questions to geovisual @ comcast.net. Thank you.

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