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Peace Monuments
in Illinois (USA)

Chicago, Illinois

Right click image to enlarge.
17th century - Picture Depicting Peace, Justice & Plenty, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Textile from England. Not on display. "Peace" holds dove & laurel. "Justice" holds sword & balance. "Plenty" holds fruit-filled corucopia.
1776 - "Peace & War," Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (USA). By Italian artist Pompeo Girolamo Batoni [1708-1787].

About 1790 - Plaque with Sacrifice to Peace, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Wedgwood (jasperware) from England. Not on display.

1887 - "Standing Lincoln" Statue, Lincoln Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). By Irish-born American sculptor August Saint-Gaudens [1848-1907]. A favorite of Hull House founder [& Nobel Peace Prize laureate] Jane Addams [1860-1935] who once wrote, "I walked the wearisome way from Hull-House to Lincoln Park ... in order to look at and gain magnanimous counsel from the statue." Left image is 1920 copy in Parliament Square, London (England).

1890 - "A Signal of Peace," Chicago, Illinois (USA). "Represents a Sioux Chief on horseback, his right hand holding a spear pointed upward in a gesture of peace." A gift of art patron Judge Lambert Tree [1832-1910]. Sculpted in France by Cyrus E. Dallin [1861-1944] and exhibited at the World's Columbian Exposition (World's Fair) in 1893.


1893-1940's - Japanese Pavilion, World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago World's Fair), Chicago, Illinois (USA). "A replica of the Phoenix Hall (Hodo), the only surviving building of Fujiwara Michinaga's palace [at Uji, near Kyoto], which was converted to a temple, Byodo-in, in 1052." /// Burned down during WW-II (arson?). 1 of 40 monuments in "Peace Symbols" by Zonia Baber (1948), pp. 22-23. /// Another, permanent replica was constructed about 1970 in the Valley of the Temples, Oahu Island, Hawaii (qv).

1893 - Kasuga Stone Lantern, Osaka Garden, Jackson Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Only surviving part of the Japanese Pavilion at the World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago World's Fair) in 1893.

1893 - Columbian Peace Plow, Chicago, Illinois (USA). WHERE IS THIS NOW? /// "Cut its first furrow on the platform of the Parliament of Religions. It was made for the Universal Peace Union [UPU] by [John] Deere & Co., Moline, Illinois." /// "In 1893, under the auspices of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), a committee was appointed. Out of this committee a decision was made to create a PEACE PLOW from historical relics collected. The committee began to search for a plow-maker. Deere & Company jumped at the opportunity. Twenty-two thousand metal relics were represented in the original plow along with over 200 historical pieces of wood, each one with an interesting history." /// "In 1893, for the World's Fair in Chicago, Deere & Company commissioned [clutch inventor] Charles W. Borg [1861-19??] to create the 'Columbian Peace Plow,' which was a plowshare composed of historic swords. Some 22,000 metal relics went into the alloy from which the blade was cast. The beam and handles contained thousands of historic wood relics, some no bigger than a dime. The Columbian Peace Plow was exhibited at Bunker Hill [Massachusetts], in several states, on the battlefield of Runnymede [England], the Paris Exposition of 1900 [France] & at numerous world peace meetings in Europe. The plow was to have its home at the National Museum in Washington [Smithsonian Institution]." /// Lower image shows "[the] fabulous re-creation of such an important historical piece... This beautiful pewter replica of the original Columbian Peace Plow was painstakingly hand crafted using original documents obtained from the Deere & Company Archives and carefully placed in a specially fitted die-cut foam to ensure its safe arrival to your collection." 1 of 40 monuments in "Peace Symbols" by Zonia Baber (1948), pp. 24-25.

September 11-27, 1893 - First Parliament of the World's Religions, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Concurrent with the World Columbian Exposition (Chicago World's Fair). Attended by 4,000 delegates from all over the World. Organized by Unitarian minister Reverend Jenkin Lloyd Jones [1843-1918]. Addresses included an introducton to Hinduism by Swami Vivekananda [1863-1902] and "The Religious Mission of the Colored Race" by Fannie Barrier Williams [1855-1944], a black member of Jones's Unitarian church in Chicago. Attended by 75-year-old Frederick Douglass [c1818-1895].


1893 - Haymarket Martyrs' Monument, Forest Home/German Waldheim Cemetery, 863 South DesPlaines Avenue, Forest Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). "The labor activists executed for their alleged role in the 1886 Haymarket Square bombing are buried here; their striking grave monument has become a magnet for labor leaders, activists, and anarchists from around the world. The monument, designed by Polish-born Albert Weinert [1863-1947] and dedicated in 1893, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1997" (the only cemetery memorial so recognized).

1922 - Fountain of Time, SE portion of Washington Park , Cottage Grove Avenue, Washington Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Immediately west of the Midway Plaisance. Based on lines by English poet Austin Dobson [1840-1921]: "Time goes, you say? Ah no, Alas, time stays, we go." Shows a cloaked figure of time observing the stream of humanity flowing past. Commemorates a century of peace between Great Britain & the USA. Sculptor Lorado Taft [1860-1936] took 14 years to complete what was called the "largest single group of statuary in existence." 1 of 40 monuments in "Peace Symbols" by Zonia Baber (1948), pp. 62-63. Entry #270 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

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1925 - Peace Triumphant Monument, Scoville Park, Oak Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Oak Park artist Gilbert Wiswold created the sculpture in 1925. It depicts a US pilot, a soldier & a sailor in front of a figure of Columbia sheathing her sword. Inscribed with the names of 2,446 veterans from Oak Park, 56 of whom were killed in WW-I. Renovation began in July 2009. Initially, it was expected to cost more than $240,000, but another $79,400 was added when inspectors in October 2009 found the foundation also was decaying. The final renovation cost was $326,400. Rededicated by Ed Avis on November 7, 2010.


1926 - "The Triumphs of Peace Endure--The Triumphs of War Perish", Elks National Memorial & Headquarters, 2750 North Lakeview Avenue, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Sculpture by Adolph Weinman [1870-1952]. Entry #281 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001). Images are details -- Peace left, War right.


1928 - Lion & Lamb Heraldry, South Gable, Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (USA).The entire work, done by Lee Lawrie & Ulric Ellerhausen, is called "The March of Religion Across the Centuries." Elijah (left) & Isaiah (right). The two animals at the sides of the shield are a lion and a lamb, referring to Isaiah's prophecies regarding peace on Earth after the return of the Messiah?

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1933 - Japanese Pavilion, Century of Progress Exposition (Chicago World's Fair), Chicago, Illinois (USA). "A typical example of Japanese architecture. An army of workmen and engineers came over from Japan bringing their own tools & materials to construct the building. The exhibits showed what Japan was doing in the peaceful arts -- militarism was not part of the exhibits."

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1939 - Palestine Pavilion, New York World's Fair, New York City, New York (USA). "Introduced the world to the concept of a modern Jewish state, which a decade later would become Israel. The pavilion featured on its façade an enormous 14-foot-tall (4.3 m) hammered repoussé copper relief sculpture entitled "The Scholar, The Laborer & the Toiler of the Soil" by the noted Art Deco sculptor Maurice Ascalon [1913-2003]." /// "Three million Americans toured the very popular Palestine Pavilion. There was no mention there of Arabs." /// Ascalon's sculpture is now part of the collection of the Spertus Museum in Chicago, Illinois (USA). Posted on March 30, 2011, by ascalonstudios: "Nudging Sleeping Giants. On a recent visit to Chicago, I was provided with a unique opportunity. I was permitted into the museum archives of the Spertus Institute where I was able to view an artwork created by the hands of my grandfather, Maurice Ascalon, some 70 years ago. Although I had, on countless occasions, seen photos of his massive Art Deco sculpture, this was the first time I had the experience of viewing the project in person. It is among the most historically-significant works to emigre [sic] from modern Israel in the years before statehood. But for decades since, the three massive 14-foot tall figures that comprise the artwork have been at rest – as if in the midst of a deep sleep – lying atop shelves in the Spertus archives [lower image]..."

Date? - Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, University of Illinois at Chicago, 800 South Halsted, Near West Side, Chicago, Illinois (USA). "A settlement house co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams [1860-1935] & Ellen Gates Starr [1859-1940]... By 1911, Hull House had grown to 13 buildings... [Since when?] the original Hull House building itself is a museum, part of the College of Architecture & the Arts at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and is open to the public." Jane Addams received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931 (with Nicholas Murray Butler).


1956-1969 - Peace & Justice Murals, Third Unitarian Church, Mayfield & Fulton Streets, Chicago, Illinois (USA). 24 murals depicting "saints of liberalism." Painted by artist Andrene Kauffman [1905-1993] over a 14 year period. The "saints" (in alphabetical order) are: Jane Addams, John Peter Altgeld (governor 1893-1897), Susan B. Anthony, E.T. Buehrer (minister 1941-1969), Albert Camus, William Ellery Channing, Confucius, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Mohandas Gandhi (left image), Jesus, Martin Luther King Jr., Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln (right image), James Martineau, Thomas Paine. Theodore Parker; Joseph Priestley, Siddhartha Gautama, Socrates, Harriet Tubman. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Walt Whitman, Roger Williams & Woodrow Wilson.

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1957 - DuSable Museum of African American History, 740 East 56th Place (corner of 57th & Cottage Grove), Washington Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). "Dedicated to the collection, preservation, interpretation and dissemination of the history and culture of Africans and Americans of African descent. The first and oldest institution of its kind in the country." Includes permanet exhibit on Africa.


1963 - "Hands of Peace," Chicago Loop Synagogue, 16 South Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Abstract bronze work by Israeli sculptor Henri Azaz [1923-2008]. Welcomes visitors in both English & Hebrew, quoting a blessing from the Bible’s Book of Numbers: "The Lord bless thee and keep thee; the Lord make His face to shine upon thee… and give thee peace."

June 3, 1970 - "Great Bird of Peace," Nichols Park, Hyde Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Also known as "The Egg" and "Guarding the Nest." "The five-foot bronze bird has the body of an egg with a beak and two legs that hold two more eggs. Sculptor Cosmo Campoli [1923-1997] called it "Bird of Peace" because he believed that the bird is the most peaceful thing there is -- especially a bird settling her eggs around her." Stolen and vandalized c.1981. Rededicated March 19, 2005, at "Eggstravaganza."

1971 - "All of Mankind" Mural, Northside Stranger’s Home Church, 617 West Evergreen Avenue, Cabrini Green, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Outdoor mural "features four figures - black, white, Asian & Latino - with their hands together in a show of unity and racial harmony. Below the church’s cross, artist William Walker painted the words 'Why were they crucified?' and the names of historical figures like Ghandi, Malcolm X, Anne Frank, Martin Luther King Jr. and Jesus Christ." Church & mural were threatened with destruction in 2007-2008.

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1981 - The Peace Museum, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Founded by Mark Rogovin & Marjorie Craig Benton. "First & only of its kind in the US, exploring the impact of war & peace through the arts." "In Short – This small museum in the Garfield Park Gold Dome explores the impacts of war and peace through the arts. In its exhibits, the museum addresses all types of nonviolence issues, from anti-nuclear activism around the world to anti-gang issues around in the community. More than 10,000 artifacts include original paintings, sculptures, drawings, ribbon banners, posters, buttons and lithographs. Exhibits feature individual peacemakers and artists, domestic violence, human rights, prisons and more" Lost its original space. "Will be sharing space with other cultural organizations in the future. Our first exhibition in shared space opens November 8, 2008, at the Chicago Public Library..." Entry #276 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

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1981 - National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum, Chicago, Illinois (USA). "The museum collects, preserves and exhibits art inspired by combat and created by veterans. Inspires greater understanding of the real impact of war with a focus on Vietnam."

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1987 - Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC), 676 North LaSalle Street (Suite 424),Chicago, Illinois (USA). "Collects, preserves, and presents historic and contemporary radio and television content. Also educates, informs, and entertains through archives, public programs, screenings, exhibits, publications and online access to resources." New facility under construction in 2009 (as seen in image).


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1995 - A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum, 10406 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois (USA). "Promotes, honors and celebrates the legacy of A. Philip Randolph and contributions made by African-Americans to America's labor history. " A. Philip Randolph [1889-1979] was a prominent African-American civil rights leader and the founder of both the March on Washington Movement and the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.


1996 - Jane Addams Memorial Park, 600 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Near Navy Pier. Honors Jane Addams [1860-1935], founder of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and first US woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize (1931). Park includes black granite statue "Helping Hands" by Louis Bourgeois. Entry #272 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).


1996 - "Helping Hands / A Touch of Jane Addams," Women's Park & Gardens, 1827 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Illinois (USA). By French-American sculptor Louise Bourgeois [1911-2010]. "The work entails six rough hewn stone bases which each support a hand or series of carved black granite hands representing a broad range of people of different ages & backgrounds. The current installation reflects the artist’s original arrangement of the sculptures & their positions." First dedicated on the city’s lake front in 1996. "The Chicago Park District team completed the relocation of the group of sculptures on June 24th, 2011."

1996 - Jane Addams Memorial Park, 600 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Honors Jane Addams [1860-1935], founder of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and first US woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize (1931). Park includes black granite statue "Helping Hands" by Louis Bourgeois. Entry #272 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

1999 - Angel of Peace, St. James Cathedral, Chicago Episcopal Diocese & Plaza, 65 East Huron, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Nine-foot bronze angel by artist William H. Kieffer. Entry #265 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

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2005 - "Comely Bank," Ridge Historic District, Chicago, Illinois (USA). House constructed in 1905. Residence of Rotary founder Paul P. Harris [1868-1947] from 1912 until his death in 1947. Grounds included an International Friendship Garden. Purchased by Paul & Jean Harris Home Foundation (PJHHF) and opened to the public in 2005.
June 19, 2005 - Japanese Stone Lantern, "Comely Bank," Chicago, Illinois (USA). From International Friendship Garden of Rotary founder Paul P. Harris [1868-1947]. Reinstalled by Paul & Jean Harris Home Foundation (PJHHF) and dedicated by businessman Yoshio Gotoh and a Japanese delegation.

2005-2009 - Home of Barack & Michelle Obama, 5046 South Greenwood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Unintentional monument. May become a museum some day. President Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2009.

2007? - "CoolGlobe,", between the Shedd Aquarium & the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Painted by artist Catherine Schwalbe-Bouzide & her husband Paul. One of many "CoolGlobes" painted by local, national & international artists, as well as school children, & scattered around the USA. "Each globe is 5 feet in diameter, 7.5 feet tall, weighs 2,300 pounds...& transforms a plain white sphere to create awareness & provoke discussion about a potential solution to global warming."


2011? - "Peace and Justice," Peace Park, Lincoln Park, Chicago, Illinois (USA). "The park features a rustic stone fountain, currently shut off for repairs, & a white post with inscriptions on each of its four sides: “May peace be in Chicago; May peace be in Illinois; May peace be in the United States; May peace prevail on Earth.” In the center of the garden, almost directly below the expressway, stands “Peace and Justice” by local artist Margot McMahon, showing two young boys, one African-American & one Caucasian, holding a ball aloft. On the front of the trapezoidal granite base a plaque reads: 'Erected in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Daisaku Ikeda’s life long struggle for peace, justice and human rights. Walking through Lincoln Park on October 9, 1960, the young president of the Soka Gakkai, Daisaku Ikeda witnessed a painful act of racial discrimination toward a young child, crystallizing his lasting commitment to rid the world of needless suffering and enabling the human dignity of all to shine.'"

October 24, 2014 - "Seeker of Truth" Mural, 1430 West 18th Street, Pilsen neighborhood, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Across the street from Foley's favorite hangout -- the Café Jumping Bean. Mural rapidly painted by ten friends who worked in shifts around the clock after death in Syria of journalist James Wright Foley [1973-2014] who was abducted during the Syrian Civil War & beheaded by the Islamic State of Iraq & Syria (ISIS). Inscribed on the mural is the poem Bani Adam by Persian poet Saadi Shirazi [1210-1292] in Arabic, English & Spanish, languages of the three cultures that helped to inform Foley & shape his life & times. See Steven Sotloff [1983-2014].

Chicago Suburbs, Illinois/Indiana

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1931 - Baha'i House of Worship for the North American Continent, 100 Linden Avenue, Wilmette, Illinois (USA). Sculpture by Adolph Weinman. Architecture by Jean-Baptiste Louis Bourgeois [1856-1930]. Garden by Hilbert Dahl. Entry #292 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

1936 - International Friendship Gardens, US Highway 12, Michigan City, Indiana (USA). Permanent spinoff of the "Old Mill Garden" at the Chicago World’s Fair (“A Century of Progress International Exposition.”) in 1933-34. Theme of the "Old Mill Garden" was "Peace and Friendship To All Nations."


1936? - Peace Bell, International Friendship Gardens, US Highway 12, Michigan City, Indiana (USA). Before & after deterioration of the frame holding the bell. Second photo by EWL.

1936? - Rotary Peace Garden, International Friendship Gardens, US Highway 12, Michigan City, Indiana (USA). Rotary International logo at left, peace pole in center. Photo by EWL.

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Date? - House Museum & Memorial to Charles G. Dawes, Evanston Historical Society, 225 Greenwood Street, Evanston, Illinois (USA). Charles G. Dawes [1865-1951] was an American banker, politician, and 30th Vice President of the USA. For his work on the Dawes Plan for World War I reparations, he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1925.

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1977 - Mitchell Museum of the American Indian, 3001 Central Street, Evanston, Illinois (USA). "The only museum in the Chicagoland area that focuses exclusively on the history, culture and arts of the North American native people."


2002 - "Children of Peace", Garden Walk, Public Library, Downers Grove, Illinois (USA). Click here to see the statue's installation. Artist Gary Lee Price of Springville, Utah, sells copies of this sculpture. Click here for prices & other information.
October 2, 2004 - Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Statue, Heritage Park, Skokie, Illinois (USA).


September 11, 2003 - "Freedom Isn't Free," between the DuPage River and the Municipal Center, Napierville, Illinois (USA). Dedicated to the "memory of Commander Dan F. Shanower and the thousands of others who died in the attack." One inscription: "Wall of Faces. Faces created by Naperville school children and molded by local artists to represent the casualties of September 11, 2001."

November 11, 2006 - Graves of the Bill of Rights [1791-2006], Habeas Corpus [1215-2006] & the Geneva Convention [1949-2006], Free Speech Park, Highland Park, Illinois (USA). Sponsored by the North Shore Women for Peace, a local Illinois organization that is 50 years strong in living their motto 'Working for peace, justice & a healthy planet.'"

Remainder of Illinois

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1874 - Lincoln's Tomb, Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Illinois (USA). Includes reproductions of Lincoln statues in Chicago & Washington, DC. Mary Todd Lincoln and sons Tad, Willie & Eddie are also buried here, but not son Robert (who is buried in Arlington National Cemetery).

1887 - Home of Abraham Lincoln & Mary Todd Lincoln, National Park Service (NPS), Springfield, Illinois (USA). Abraham Lincoln & Mary Todd Lincoln lived here 1844-1961. Donated by their son Robert to State of Illinois in 1887 and immediately opened to public (making it one of the earliest publicly held historical sites in the USA). Donated to National Park Service in 1972.


October 28, 1911

August 11, 2016
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- Statue of Robert Ingersoll, Glen Oak Park, Peoria, Illinois (USA). Robert G. Ingersoll [1833-1899] was a lawyer, Civil War veteran, political leader & orator during the Golden Age of Free Thought (roughly 1875-1914). Noted for his broad range of culture & his defense of agnosticism, Ingersoll was nicknamed "The Great Agnostic." Sculpted in 1909 by Fritz Triebel [1865-1948] in Genoa, Italy. "Eugene Baldwin [1843-1914], founder of The Peoria Star, labored long & hard to bring the statue to Peoria." The Freedom from Religion Foundation (FFRF) & Center for Inquiry (CFI) restored the statue & rededicated it on August 11, 2016 (Ingersoll's 183th birthday). See Ingersoll's restored birthplace in Dresden, New York.


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March 10, 1919 - World War I Memorial, West Main & South Gilbert Streets, Danville, Illinois (USA). Statue of Peace on top. Two soldiers, a sailor & a nurse on the four corners of the base. Inscription on front: "Whereas: it is the desire of the City of Danville to erect some permanent structure as a Monument & Memorial to the Gallant Soldiers and Sailors of Danville who participated in the World’s War of 1914 and 1918 , and Whereas: the bridge over the Vermilion River at Gilbert Street in said City needs to be replaced - - Therefore: be it resolved by the City Council of Danville Illinois that a new bridge be built over the Vermilion River at Gilbert Street in said City - - Said bridge to be a Monument and memorial to our Soldiers as set forth in the Preamble hereof & to be known as 'The Victory Bridge.' Adopted March 10, 1919."


1935 - Grave of Jane Addams, Cedarville (30 miles west of Rockford), Illinois (USA). Addams died in Chicago. The obilisk at her grave was restored in 2004. Jane Addams [1860-1935] was president of the Women's International League for Peace & Freedom (WILPF). She & Nicholas Murray Butler [1862-1947] shared the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize. "As the first U.S. woman to win the prize, Addams was applauded for her 'expression of an essentially American democracy.'"


1963 - Bald Knob Cross of Peace, Bald Knob, Shawnee National Forest, Alto Pass, Illinois (USA). Largest cross in North America. "111 feet (34 m) tall and is visible, when lit at night, over an area of 7,500 square miles (19,000 km2). Base made of Illinois marble, and upper portion covered by reinforced steel porcelain panels. Use of interior stairway discontinued in 1982." Site of Easter sunrise services since 1937. "In 1963 when our relations with Russia took a turn for the better, [the foundation] thought the cross could have a good effect if known as The Cross Of Peace around which our prayers could center."

1998 - "Mother Theresa of Calcutta," St. Mary's Cathedral, Peoria, Illinois (USA). Heroic size 6-foot bronze satue by Lonnie Stewart. "Mother Theresa visited the cathedral for a special mass in her honor in December 1995. The cathedral has been a Peoria landmark & religious epicenter for over a century." Mother Theresa [1910-1997] received the Nobel Peace prize in 1979.
Date? - Peace Window, Northminster Presbyterian Church, 10720 North Knoxville Avenue, Peoria, Illinois (USA). Depicts lion & lamb from Isaiah 11: 6-9.


1998 - Peace Garden / Fire Circle, Campbell's Island, Quad Cities, Illinois (USA). Lead artist is Kinhild Blacklock. "Designed to honor the Native American history of the site & intended to contrast with the existing War Monument at the site."

May 2000 - Ronald Reagan Peace Garden, Ronald Reagan Museum, Eureka College, Eureka, Illinois (USA). "Dedicated on the 18th anniversary of what is known as 'The Eureka Speech.' Includes a bust of Mr. Reagan, sculpted by nationally-recognized artist, Lonnie Stewart. In designing the bust, Mr. Stewart commented, 'There are many different images of Ronald Reagan but I think the one that's most dear to the hearts of all the millions of Americans who loved him, is that Ronald Reagan smile. A smile of reassurance, of dignity and integrity, and one that we all know and love.' Also includes a large remnant of the Berlin Wall. It is only fitting that a piece of the symbolic barrier between East & West that Mr. Reagan helped bring down has found a place at Eureka. The garden was a gift to the College from Mr. and Mrs. David J. Vaughan of Peoria Heights, Illinois."

August 25, 2000 - Wings of Peace & Freedom Park, Dixon, Illinois (USA). ''Gifted by Nick Tanev, a native of Bulgaria who immigrated to the USA and prospered. Symbolizes the hope the East and the West would come together and live in peace and freedom." Includes replica of Berlin Wall (largest words: PEACE & FREIHEIT). On Ronald Reagan Trail. Dixon is the childhood home of President Ronald Reagan.

Date? - Minnie Vautrin Memorial, Secor Community Building, Secor, Illinois (USA). Bench & plaque memorializing Minnie Vautrin [1886-1941], an American missionary born in Secor, IL (population 379). Renowned for saving the lives of many women at the Ginling Girls College in Nanking, China, during the Nanjing Massacre.
December 13, 2000 - Minnie Vautrin Memorial, Ginling Girls College, Nanjing (China). Minnie Vautrin [1886-1941], was an American missionary renowned for saving the lives of many women during the Nanjing Massacre. Click here for chronology of Ginling College & Minnie Vautrin.



2002 - Keeling-Puri Peace Plaza, Perryville Bike Path, Riverside & McFarland, Rockford, Illinois (USA). "Forty Flags, Sixty Languages, Ten Prophets of Peace, Two Hemispheres, One World." "Celebrates the rich and diverse ethnic history of the Rock River Valley." 15 foot by 34 foot sculpture “Harmony Atlas” atop a 7 foot by 25 foot granite sculpture base...adorned with 10 peace quotes" from John F. Kennedy; Mother Theresa; Martin Luther King; Mahatma Gandhi; an Oglala Sioux Native American; Albert Einstein; Abraham Lincoln; John Lennon; Petrarch; Aristide Briand; . . . and the Q&A from Micah 6:8 of Jewish, Christian and Islamic tradition: "And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God."


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October 14, 2004, & April 19, 2005 - Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum, Springfield, Illinois (USA). Displays all aspects of Lincoln's life & presidency, including the emacipation of American slaves.

November 11, 2016 - "Armistice - A Memorial to Peace," Veterans Memorial Hall & Museum, 211 North Main Street, Rockford, Illinois (USA). "A new historical memorial... Our dedication ceremony will mirror one of the first citywide Armistice programs which occurred in 1933. [It] will include as much of the original 1933 event elements as possible -- a moment of silence at 11 AM, an address from 16th District Congressman Adam Kinzinger, a 21 gun salute by Rockford Detachment 083, Marine Corps League, and the playing of taps... The site grounds will be adorned with poppies created by Easter Seal kids similar to the 1933 ceremony. The Memorial will honor Veterans & educate the community of past Armistice/Veterans Day events at its location [and] inform visitors about the Civil War Statue mounted on a Column from Rockford’s original Carnegie Library..."

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