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Peace Monuments
in Northern California (USA)

Click here for peace monuments in Southern California.

N.B. This web page has two parts: (1) San Francisco & Bay Area and (2) Remainder of Northern California.

(1) San Francisco & Bay Area

Right click image to enlarge.

1915 - "Peace," near Lake Merced, San Francisco, California (USA). By Benny Bufano [1898-1970]. Won first prize ($500) in the "Immigrant in America" contest...over 100 other submissions. Theodore Roosevelt singled out Bufano for praise and asked to meet him... Bufano chopped off his trigger finger and sent it to President Woodrow Wilson at the onset of World War I as a protest against the war." "Graced the entrance of San Francisco International Airport (SFO) for nearly four decades, is now located near Lake Merced."

1939-1940 - Temple of Religion & Tower of Peace, Golden Gate International Exposition (California World's Fair), Treasure Island, San Francisco, California (USA). "Representation of various world religions certainly occurred at earlier expositions. What is notable about this exposition's presentation is the theme of religious unity. Along with more typical Christian groups, the Fair included representations of Buddhists, Bahai'is, Christian Scientists, Jews, Mormons, Protestants & others. This is particularly interesting in light of the impending World War that would embroil nations in a struggle that emphasized disunity & differences. Rabbi Rudolph I. Coffee states, 'Unitedly we embarked on this spiritual adventure, & in working together, we learned to know & love one another.'"

1939-1940 - "The Peacemakers" mural, Court of Pacifica, Golden Gate International Exposition (California World's Fair), Treasure Island, San Francisco, California (USA). By the three Bruton Sisters (Helen, Esther & Margaret) [1894-1992], as seen behind mural portion in the lower image. The fair lasted two years (1939-1940).


June 26, 1945 - War Memorial Building, United Nations Plaza, , San Francisco, California (USA). Signing of the United Nations Charter at the United Nations Conference on International Organization by 50 of the 51 original member countries. (Poland signed later). The UN Charter entered into force on October 24, 1945. The auditorium was renamed the Herbst Theatre in 1977.

NB: The following account is from the autobiography of Robert Swann [1918-2003]:


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1962 - "Everyman," Sausalito, California (USA). "In 1962 the US announced another round of nuclear tests in the Pacific. We decided to build a 30-foot trimaran sailboat designed by Arthur Piver [1910-1968] and sail it into the testing zone. The US Attorney in San Francisco decided to try to stop us by issuing a 'cease and desist' order. The "Everyman" sailed serenely out under the Bay Bridge [sic] and into ocean waters with a crew of three. Following the boat was a Coast Guard cutter with a US Marshall. Hovering above it all were several helicopters, also with reporters and photographers. All of this was being carried on local radio and TV news so that practically everyone in the San Francisco area was aware of the story. Eventually, with the help of the Coast Guard, he managed to arrest and handcuff the crew and return them to San Francisco. I was also arrested and spent the night in the San Francisco jail [sic] along with the sailors. Meanwhile, the word had gone out. Hundreds of supporters arrived at the Federal courthouse where we were being held. They filled the entire building before closing time, refusing to leave when ordered to do so. We turned our night in jail into a party. Joan Baez lead the singing and we danced all night long. The next day the Feds dropped the case against me but charged the three sailors, who spent a couple of months in jail." (Image shows Arthur Piver's 30-foot "Nimble" built in 1969 in the UK. Piver left Sausalito alone in his 36-foot trimaran on March 17, 1968, en route to San Diego and was never seen again.)


1968 - Peace Pagoda, Peace Plaza, Nihonmachi/Japantown, San Francisco, California (USA). Designed by Japanese architect Yoshiro Taniguchi [1900-1955] and presented to San Francisco by the people of Osaka (Japan).

1968 - "The Hawk for Peace," Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, University of California, Berkeley, California (USA). By Alexander Calder [1898-1976]. Click here for list of Calder sculptures in the USA, of which only the one in Berkeley is named for peace.


1968 - "St. Francis of the Guns," Science Building, City College of San Francisco, San Francisco, California (USA). After the 1968 shootings of Bobby Kennedy & Martin Luther King Jr, San Francisco's Mayor Joseph Alioto led a voluntary gun turn-in program that accumulated a conveniently symbolic 1,968 weapons. Benny Bufano [1890-1970], an Italian-born Bay Area artist, was tapped to sculpt something with the melted gun metal (he mixed in some bronze so it wouldn't rust in the S.F. Bay dampness). Bufano sculpted "St. Francis of the Guns," a nearly 9-ft tall figure of a robed Catholic saint, his arms spread in peaceful greeting. On his robe, Benny created a mosaic mural showing the glowing heads of four of America's greatest assassinated leaders: Abe Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., Robert Kennedy & John F. Kennedy. The naive caricatures capture all four with worried frowns.

1975 - United Nations Plaza, San Francisco, California (USA). Near the War Memorial Building where the UN charter was signed on June 26, 1945. Constructed as part of the Market Street Reconstruction Project in conjunction with the subterranean installation of the BART subway line. Now in need of redevelopment.

1981 - California African American Museum (CAAM), Exposition Park, 600 State Drive, San Francisco, California (USA).

July 4, 1982 - "Behold the Sea," Mendocino, California (USA). Sister city plaque for Mendocino & Miasa, Nagano (Japan). "At the tip of the peninsula." Sister city "relationship formed in 1980 due to the friendship of Mendocino artist Bill Zacha & Japanese artist Toshi Yoshida." Inscription (in Japanese & English): "The citizens of the sister cities of Mendocino and Miasa, Japan dedicate this plaque to the peaceful pursuits of the peoples of the Pacific Basin and to the protection of its environment that all living things there-in may exist in perpetual harmony." Information courtesy of Jill Hoyles 26Apr2015.

October 7, 1983 - "Our Lady of Peace," Shrine of Our Lady of Peace, Santa Clara, California (USA). 32-foot 7200-pound stainless steel statue by Charles C. Parks, a noted sculptor of Wilmington, Delaware. "The only major Marian Shrine on the West Coast between Our Lady of Sorrows Shrine in Portland, Oregon (over 700 miles to the north), & the famous Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City (over 2,300 miles to the south)." Visible from Highway 101 at the Great America Parkway exit. Call "the Awesome Madonna" & "Freeway Mary." On San Francisco Chronicle's list of "Underrated Landmarks" in the Bay area.

1985? - Japanese Bell, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, California (USA). A 2100-pound 16th-century Japanese bronze bell from a temple in Tajima Province (Japan). Ceremonially rung 108 times on New Year's Eve.


1988 - Statue of Mahatma Gandhi, Ferry Building, San Francico, California (USA). Given to the city by the Gandhi Memorial International Foundation, a non-profit organization run by Yogesh K. Gandhi.

April 7, 1989 - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Martin Luther King, Jr., Park, Berkeley, California (USA). Dedicated by Rev. Jesse Jackson. Entry #52 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

Date? - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Willard Middle School, 2425 Stuart Street, Berkeley, California (USA).

1989 - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Chabot Elementary School, Oakland, California (USA). 644 tiles. Entry #98 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

Date? - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Cafeteria, Merritt College, Oakland, California (USA). 1000 tiles. Entry #98 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

Date? - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Unity Center of Walnut Creek, Walnut Creek, California (USA).

1994 - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Fruitvale Rapid Transit Station (BART), Oakland California (USA). 3500 tiles. Entry #98 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
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1994 - The Maestra Peace Mural, Women's Building / Casa de las mujeres, Lapidge & 18th Streets (between Valencia & Mission Streets), Mission District, San Francisco, California (USA). "Designed and painted by Juana Alicia, Miranda Bergman, Edythe Boone, Susan Kelk Cervantes, Meera Desai, Yvonne Littleton and Irene Perez. A multicultural homage to iconic women and women’s history, and its scale is incredible." "Has many messages: The healing power of women's wisdom over time, the contributions of women throughout history, and the making of history by women from all corners of the earth. A few of the famous women included are Audre Lorde, Georgia O'Keefe, and Rigoberta Menchu. In addition, female icons such as Quan Yin, Yemeyah, and Coyoxauqui lend a timeless and spiritual element to the design. Additional elements used in the overall design are fabric patterns from throughout the world."
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May 5, 1995 - Cesar Chavez mural, San Francisco State University, Malcolm X Plaza, San Francisco, California (USA). Lead artist Carlos (Cookie) Gonzalez. Dedicated about seven months after the SFSU Student Union was renamed after Chavez. The United Farm Workers (UFW) logo of an eagle was taken [by Cesar Chavez [1927-1993] & his brother Robert] from the Mexican flag. (The UFW was the first successful farm workers union in US history with a membership of 100,000 at its peak.) Logo colors represent hope (white), struggle of workers (black) & sacrifice (red). In his left hand Chavez holds a dove, which symbolizes his belief in non-violent resistance. Also present in the mural are the “Grapes of Wrath,” which resemble skulls to signify the harmful effects of pesticides on farm workers. The grapes also represent the first consumer boycott of the UFW, the 1965 Delano strike.

1995 - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Jack London Square, Oakland, California (USA). Three sections added in July 1997 & January 1999. 3000 tiles. Entry #98 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

December 20, 1998 - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Ashkenaz Music & Dance Community Center, Berkeley, California (USA).

1999 - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Fruitvale Elementary School, Oakland, California (USA). 2000 tiles. Entry #98 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
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1999-2004 - Artship, Grove Street Pier, Jack London Square, Oakland, California (USA). The former "Golden Bear" -- built by US Government in 1939, a passenger/cargo ship for Delta Lines, then a California Maritime Academy training ship. In 1995, Artship was "chosen as the US headquarters of the International Peace University [sic]... [After 1999, its] highly developed and diverse grass roots programming and participation were becoming a recognizable nexus for developing a signature venue, a dynamic capable of becoming a destination and an epicenter of Oakland specific urban revitalization...leading to cultural tourism. [But] the City of Oakland sued and evicted Artship on January 1, 2004. Its agency the Port of Oakland strong-armed the ARTSHIP Foundation to renounce its title to the ship and sold it for scrap."

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January 15, 2000 - Peace Bell, Martin Luther King, Jr. Civic Center Building (west entrance), 2180 Milvia Street, Berkeley, California (USA). Cast from melted guns for the 50th anniversary of the UN Charter (signed in the War Memorial Building in nearby San Francisco) by Bruce Hasson, founder of the "Bell Project" which promotes world peace by using melted-down firearms to castbells which incorporate images of nonviolence and environmental concerns. Rung at the War Memorial Building by Attorney General Janet Reno.
April 2003 - Peacemakers Mural, Glide Memorial Church, Mason Street, San Francisco, California (USA). One panel (shown at left) by Dr. Fayeq Oweis. Complete mural is 160 feet wide by 6 feet tall.
November 14, 2003 - Arabic/Islamic Cultural Mural, Islamic Society of San Francisco, Market & 7th Streets, San Francisco, California (USA). 54 feet by 30 feet. Designed by Dr. Fayeq Oweis, Khalil BenDib & Said Nuseibeh. See Arab-American Museum in Dearborn, Michigan.
2005 - Museum of the African Diaspora (MOAD), 685 Mission Street, San Francisco, California (USA). Permanent Exhibitions: * CELEBRATIONS: RITUALS AND CEREMONY * MUSIC OF THE DIASPORA * CULINARY TRADITIONS * ADORNMENT * SLAVERY PASSAGES * THE FREEDOM THEATER * AFRICAN ORIGINS MAP

October 16, 2005 - Statue of Tommie Smith & John Carlos, San Jose State University (SJSU), San Jose, California (USA). By political artist Rigo 23. Shows Smith & Carlos protesting conditions for US blacks on the medal stand at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Inscription on plaque: "At the Mexico City 1968 Olymjpic Games, San Jose State University Student-Athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos Stood for Justice, Dignity, Equality and Peace. Hereby the University and Associated Students Commemorate Their Legacy."
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2007 - Edward Said Mural, Cesar Chavez Student Union, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California (USA). By Fayeq Oweis & Susan Greene. Edward Said [1935-2003] "was a Palestinian-American literary theorist, advocate for Palestinian rights, Professor of English & Comparative Literature at Columbia University & a founding figure in postcolonialism. Robert Fisk described him as the Palestinians' 'most powerful political voice.'"

March 30, 2008 - Abraham Lincoln Brigade Memorial, Justin Herman Plaza, foot of Market Street, Embarcadero, San Francisco, California (USA). "Designed by Ann Chamberlain and Walter Hood. Donated by the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives and Veterans & Friends of the ALB. 40-foot long monument comprised of 45 onyx panels held together by a steel structure. The translucent stone squares show scenes from the war and the faces of some US volunteers in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), as well as words about the period from writers like Ernest Hemingway." Other ALB memorials in Madison, WI, & Seattle, WA (qv).
2008 - Peace Mural, west wall of the Good Earth Grocery, Fairfax, Marin County, California (USA). Sponsored by Marin Center for Peace & Justice.

June 2008 - "Warning," Mission Street at 17th Street, San Francisco, California (USA). "Contribution of Victor Cartagena to the "Seeing Peace" Billboard Project in San Francisco. This project is a prototype for a larger exhibit slated to be presented at the United Nations in New York in 2009. The intention of the project is to bring the imagination of five visual artists to engage in a dialogue of international peace through the creation of culturally construed images as to what peace looks like as depicted on full size outdoor advertising billboards." Click here for video.


September 2008 - Arch of Dignity, Equality & Justice (César Chávez Monument), California State University, Paseo de César E. Chávez, San Jose, California (USA). By Judy Baca. "Dedicated César E. Chávez [1927-1993]. A testament to his struggles and achievements and an inspiration to others to follow a life of service."

Date? - " La Lucha Continua / The Struggle Continues," 3260-23rd Street (between Mission & Capp Streets), San Francisco, California (USA). A talking wall [painted by Susan Greene] which you can hear by going to the mural location where there is a key of extension numbers. Dial 415.200.4587 followed by the extension number of the person you wish to hear and enjoy - or your can download a printable mural key here. The portraits: Mumia Abu-Jamal, Aristide, Judi Bari, Soha Bechara, Maurice Bishop, Madame Binh, Marilyn Buck, Sitting Bull, Cesar Chavez, Rachel Corrie, Bernadette Devlin, Franz Fanon, Ghandi, Emma Goldman, Che Guevara, Handala, Joe Hill, Dolores Huerta, Frida Kahlo, Leila Khaled, Martin Luther King Jr., Lolita Lebron, Audre Lorde, Patrice Lumumba, Rosa Luxemburg, Farabundo Martí, José Martí, Rigoberta Menchu, Leonard Peltier, Archbishop Oscar Romero, Edward Said, Augusto César Sandino, Assata Shakur, Harriet Tubman, Pancho Villa, Malcolm X, Sofia Yamaika, Emiliano Zapata. /// Click here for 360-degree photo of this mural.

May 31, 2013 - "Remember Them," (Champions for Humanity Monument), Henry J. Kaiser Memorial Park, 19th & Rashida Muhammad Streets, Oakland, California (USA). Next to Fox Theater. Bronze with cast stone base. Measures 25' high x 52' wide, covers 1,000 sq. ft. & weighs over 60,000 lbs. With four sections, this is the largest bronze monument on the west coast, and the only monument in the country dedicated to Civil Rights [sic]... Highlights the accomplishments of 25 global humanitarians..." /// "$7 million monument, featuring 25 famous people who fought for peace or human rights. They're an unlikely crew, ranging from Winston Churchill to Malcolm X to Harvey Milk to Mother Teresa. 'People don't usually pay attention to public artwork. But the artwork that people get excited about - it's big,' said Oakland artist Mario Chiodo, 48, who until now was best known for his horror masks and Las Vegas sculptures. 'If I had my way, it would have 300 people. But you've got to start someplace.'" /// N.B.: Official groundbreaking took place June 20, 2011.

Future - "Global Peace Center," Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, California (USA). Reuse of former prison proposed by Native Americans.

(2) Remainder of Northern California

Right click image to enlarge.
NB: Click here for Wikipedia's summry of the "Phoenix," the "Golden Rule," & the Committee for Non-Violent Action (CNVA).

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1954 - "Phoenix of Hiroshima," North Fork of Mokelumne River, off Tyler Island, Lodi, California (USA?). "John Gardner (phoenixofhiroshima @comcast.net, 209-570-4070) has already rescued the Phoenix (bottom image) after seeing it listed for free on craigslist [in late 2006 or early 2007], its San Francisco owner simply wanting to get rid of it to avoid paying any more fees to the Oyster Point Marina. Gardner paid a San Francisco boater to tow it to its current location." Constructed in Hiroshima (Japan) by American Quaker Earle Reynolds [1910-1998] (top image). "1954 brought the realization of a dream for Reynolds when he, his first wife Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990], and their three children began an around the world voyage on the Phoenix. They stopped at over one hundred ports, and Earle gave lectures on conditions in Hiroshima. Young Jessica [middle image] documented this trip in her book, which was later published [1958]. When they arrived in Hawaii in 1958, they met the crew of the Golden Rule (qv), Quakers who were on trial for their attempt to sail into the nuclear test zone near Bikini Island to protest nuclear weapons and atmospheric testing. They had been arrested and prevented from completing their mission. After talking with the crew of the Golden Rule, Dr. Reynolds and his family decided to complete the mission in their place. He also believed that the government did not have a right to restrict access to the open ocean. After sailing into the restricted zone, he was arrested and sentenced to two years in prison. This verdict was appealed and eventually overturned." Earle Reynolds founded the Peace Resource Center at the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) in 1975. Barbara Reynolds founded the World Friendship Center in Hiroshima (Japan) in 1965 and the Peace Resource Center at Wilmington College, Ohio, in 1975.
NB: Click here for comments & images received from Jessica Reynolds Shaver Renshaw after the foregoing was uploaded. /// Go to July 2016 to see underwater discovery of the "Phoenix of Hiroshima."




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1958? - "Golden Rule," Eureka, California (USA). Now out of water and for sale by Leon Zerlang (humtug@gmail.com). Asking price is $9,500. Email Jan. 19, 2010 from Wendy E. Chmielewski, PhD, George Cooley Curator, Swarthmore College Peace Collection, Swarthmore. Pennsylvania (USA): "The sailing ship that in 1958 [Quakers] Albert Bigelow [1906-1993], James Peck [1914-1993], George Willoughby [1914-2010] (who just passed away two weeks ago), attempted to sail into the atomic testing grounds near the Marshall Islands. The ship has been repossessed by Leon Zerlang, the ship yard owner (from the bankrupt actual owner). Leon is aware of the ship's history and would like to help save The Golden Rule, but needs ideas and help on what to do to save this ship. Several years ago I received an almost identical email from another ship owner trying to save The Phoenix (qv), a sailing ship with a similar history. I don't know the fate of The Phoenix. It would be a shame to lose still another piece of peace movement history. Ideally something like The Golden Rule, a beautiful sailing ship, should be preserved by the Smithsonian, but I don't know that they have any interest in it." Right image shows Earle Reynolds [1910-1998], his second wife Akie Nagami, Phil Drath, Betty Boardman, Bob Eaton, Horace Champhy, and Ivan Massar embarking from Misaki, Kanagawa (Japan) on February 16, 1967, en route to North Vietnam with medical supplies. "In 1959, Bigelow published a book, "Voyage of the Golden Rule: An Experiment with Truth," which documented his journey. The story would go on to inspire fellow Quaker Marie Bohlen to suggest the use of a similar tactic to members of the Vancouver-based Don't Make a Wave Committee (later to become Greenpeace) in 1970."



1962 - "Peace," Timber Cove Inn, near Jenner, Sonoma County, California (USA). 72-foot tall obelisk by the naive/abstract Italian-born San Francisco sculptor Beniamino (Benny) Bufano [1998-1970]. Officially named "The Expanding Universe." Begun in September 1962, just weeks before the Cuban Missile Crisis, the 93-foot-tall [sic] concrete, lead, & mosaic sculpture is adorned with elements of the Madonna, Universal Child & a large, open hand -- themes of peace... From Bufano's perspective, a symbolic 'projectile' recalling the cold war's intercontinental ballistic missiles that in 1962 threatened life on earth... Bufano believed in peace, but he was...eclectic, suspicious, egotistical, occasionally hostile... Yet, Bufano's sculptures still survive &, given their hard material constituents and public ownership, will for years to come. [They] remind us of Bufano's challenge to remain vigilant in our defense of democracy, to cherish world peace, and to honor & protect the planet's children..." Click here for source of this quote.


1967 - "Hand of Peace," Walnut Creek, California (USA). "A monument to peace by a famous artist, who reportedly cut off his trigger finger and sent it to President Woodrow Wilson to protest World War I, may soon adorn a Walnut Creek park. The nearly 5-ton sculpture is made of copper, mosaic & stained glass. The 30-foot-tall open-hand figure has stained glass around the fingers & a mural in the middle of the palm featuring a group of children. Above them, an inscription reads, "The children of the world shall inherit the earth." The sculpture sat relatively unnoticed in an office park in Walnut Creek on Quail Court from 1967 to 2009, when it was taken down for restoration. Four years after Italian-born artist Beniamino Bufano [1890-1970] installed his massive sculpture in Walnut Creek, he died. But now [2012] the family that owns the sculpture has offered to let the city display it prominently for at least the next 25 years. The chosen spot is in downtown's Civic Park."

1980 - Elightenment Stupa, "Northwest Tibetan Temple of America, Odiyan Buddhist Retreat Center, Cazadero (California). Odiyan is "a Tibetan Buddhist monastery built by and for American Buddhists from the Nyingma Center, dedicated to saving Tibetan Buddhism.. The structures of Odiyan are being built as the first large-scale 3-dimensional mandala... The Odiyan Stupa radiates positive energy that fosters harmony in nature, peace on earth, and happiness for all beings."

1984 - Livermore Peace Monument, South Livermore Avenue, Livermore, California (USA), home of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Created by local sculptor Don Homan, an employee of LLNL. At site of former main library. Originally made of plywood at Homan's own expense. But later remade from sheets of welded bronze (at a cost to the city of $100,000) & rededicaed by Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson in the presence of a delegation from Russia. Click here to see brochure in Japanese. Entry #74 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
Date? - Peace Monument, Yotsukaido (Japan). "Sculptor Don Homan presents a [one-third scale] replica of the peace monument to Livermore's sister city."

April 10, 1986 - Tree of Peace, Shasta Hall, California State University, Sacramento, California (USA). Original plaque (shown in image) given on Indigenous People's Day (Oct. 12, 2009) to Ensuring Native Indian Traditions club (ENIT) by E. Nathan Jones, CSU Theatre & Dance Department. Its inscription: "TREE OF PEACE. Dedicated by Chief Jake Swamp of the Mohawk Nation, April 10, 1986. 'When I look at this tree, May I be reminded that I laid down my weapons forever.'" Information courtesy of Trevor Super.

October 2, 1990 - Peace Garden, Fresno State University, Fresno, California (USA). Created by Prof. Sudarshan Kapoor. Includes statues of Mahatma Gandhi (1990), Cesar Chavez (1996), Martin Luther King, Jr. (1998), & Jane Addams (2006). The Peace Garden was renovated in 2008 & rededicated on Earth Day 2009 as part of the new library project. Entry #65 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).


December 6, 1995 - "Colateral Damage: A Reality of War," downtown, Santa Cruz, California (USA). Created by metal artist E.A. Chase. "Bronze humanoid figures peer & wail skyward, clutching each other as they appear to melt, perhaps the effect of napalm, an atomic burst, or some other horror." Honors civilians killed in wartime. “Designed in 1959 as a gift for the United Nations, the controversial nature of the piece led to a definitive communication from the State Department that it was ‘inappropriate.’ Finally, decades later in 1995, the statue was instead dedicated in the City of Santa Cruz, now to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima & Nagasaki. It is inscribed: 'Collateral Damage: a reality of war by E.A. Chase. In memory of civilians who have died in all wars and in appreciation of all who actively “wage peace.” It is dedicated by Veterans of Foreign Wars, Bill Motto Post 5888; The Resource Center for Nonviolence; The City of Santa Cruz; and, finally, by the sculptor himself: longtime local E.A. Chase, who donated the statue in full knowledge that it would never be placed in New York’s U.N. Plaza.' “The historic erection of this statue in Santa Cruz Public Space was preceded by a gun turn-in & a Tibetan singing bowl ringing. Thereafter, the guns & the bowl were buried beneath. The dedication was followed by a memorable concert attended by 12,000 people. The commemorative video for the dedication of the Statue is entitled, "Collateral Damage: A time for community response.” It captures the essence of the historic moment, as well as the stars who graced the stage that day, including David Crosby, Graham Nash, and Bonny Raitt." Information courtesy of Stephen Zunes 19Oct2013. Entry #155 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).


May 23, 1998 - "Prayer for Peace," National Peace Site, Peace Garden, Ragle Ranch Regional Park, Sonoma County, California (USA). "A spectacular sculpture created by world-renowned artist Masayuki Nagase." "Selected from 52 entries. Masayuki Nagase says,"The standing granite slabs represent hands, so that a person can stand between them while facing the third piece with carved water waves symbolizing the source of human spirit and consciousness." Entry #161 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).


2003 - International World Peace Rose Garden, State Capitol Park, Sacramento, California (USA). One of several such gardens in different countries sponsored by this California organization.

April 17, 2005 - Peace Dome, Peaceful Pathways Sanctuary, Copperopolis, California (USA). Off Highway 4 between Stockton and Angels Camp. "Dedicated to the promotion of peace in all its aspects: Peace in the world, Peace between groups, Peace between individuals, Peace with the environment, And that very important Inner Peace! Founder & Director Cheryl Canfield, CHT, is a wellness and life counselor, teacher of spiritual principles, author, therapeutic yoga instructor, peace proponent (inner as well as outer), nationally known inspirational speaker and workshop leader, and current President of Friends of Peace Pilgrim, co-compiler of "Peace Pilgrim: Her Life and Work in Her Own Words," and compiler & editor of "Peace Pilgrim's Wisdom."

Summer 2007 - "Peaces of Chico," Camellia Substation, downtown Chico, California (USA). "One of the most prominently featured murals in Chico. Painted by artist Greg Payne in partnership with local high school students."


September 30, 2007 - Mount Shasta Community Peace Mural, Visitor's Bureau Park, Mount Shasta, California (USA). 8 feet by 20 feet mural depicts what various community members see as their "Vision of Peace." Sponsored by the Siskiyou Arts Council (SAC).

Early February 2015 - Peace Pole, Walnut Park, Petaluma, Sonoma County, California (USA). "A portion of the $150,000 Walnut Park renovation project that is focused on bringing a vision of worldwide peace to Petaluma has been anything but peaceful after several members of the Petaluma Service Club Alliance voiced objections this week about a recommendation adopted last August by the city’s Recreation, Music & Parks Commission. A three-sided granite & steel Peace Pole was installed early last month with only a single expression of 'Peace' spelled out in English. Steel plaques with peace spelled out in several other languages were initially tooled & had been awaiting installation. But that came to a halt just over a year ago after two commissioners questioned the choice of languages used on the pole, as well as the way that the languages would be displayed."

April 23, 2015 - Armenian Genocide Monument, south of the Satellite Student Union, Fresno State University, Fresno, California (USA). "Designed by Fresno architect Paul Halajian. Embodies symbols of cultural meaning to the Armenian people. Its principal components, a series of pillars, are arranged in a circular pattern & angled inwards, reminiscent of Tzitzernagapert / Armenian Martyrs Monument in Yerevan (Armenia). Built from béton brut and Tufa stones, the nine pillars represent the six provinces of historic Western Armenia—Van, Bitlis, Dikranagerd, Kharpert, Sepastia, and Erzerum—Cilicia, the Diaspora, and the Republic of Armenia. They gradually descend in height around the circle, with the first measuring 19 feet high and the last 15 feet to underscore the significance of the year 1915. An incomplete halo will be set above on top of the pillars, symbolizing both the fracture left by the Genocide & the unity of the Armenian people. /// The unveiling ceremony is organized by the Armenian Genocide Centennial—Fresno Committee, an association of local organizations that is promoting a series of centennial events in the Central Valley."

August 6-September 21, 2015 - Peace Pole Project, Arcata, California (USA). "We are looking for 'visible to the public' places in Arcata (e.g. parks, businesses, stores, gardens, granges, churches, art venues & individual front yards) to install Peace Poles for the 2015 International Day Of Peace." Click here for more images. Information courtesy of Jill Hoyles.

October 11, 2015 - Living Peace Wall, Sebstopol, Sonoma County, California (USA). "Myriad memorials honor those lost to war. Michael Gillotti [67-year-old founder & former owner of the town’s Pisces Productions massage-table manufacturing shop] believes the alternate wall of tribute he’s building in Sebastopol does nothing to detract from nor minimize their sacrifices. The project dominating Gillotti’s life is the Living Peace Wall, panels of granite that will be capped by a cast bronze peace sign & that will be etched with the names of 'those who have worked nonviolently for peace & justice.'" Gillotti & his helpers have set the piece’s blond, arcing, concrete base. Atop it will be seven sculpted tablets of 6-inch-thick granite, the two at the ends nearly 2 feet high & the tallest, 6 feet high at the center, including the peace symbol..." /// Four 2015 Honorees: Sebastopol resident Barry Latham-Ponneck [b. 1951], Sebastopol resident Alicia Sanchez [b. 1951], Santa Rosa resident Rev. George Houser [1916-2015] & South African Nelson Mandela [1918-2013]. /// Four 2016 Honorees: Georgia resident Jimmy Carter [b. 1924], Lucy Forest [1920-2015], Linda Sartor [b. 1954] & Santa Rosa resident Dr. Charles O. Prickett [b. 1946]. /// Information courtesy of Barry Ponneck 5Sept2016.



July 9, 2016 - Phoenix of Hiroshima, North Mokelumne River, near Isleton, Sacramento County, California (USA). Sailboat sunk in 2010. Found on July 9, 2016, by boat from Sacramento County Sherriff's Department (upper right image) using sonar (upper left image). The boat was constructed near Hiroshima (Japan) by American Quaker Earle Reynonds [1910-1998] in 1954. He & his family used it to sail around the world, then they deliberately sailed into the American nuclear testing zone in the Pacific Ocean in 1958 to protest nuclear weapons. The Reynolds family now hopes to raise the historic 62-year old boat, then transport it to a boatyard in Port Townsend, Washington, for restoration (like the Golden Rule). Information & first 3 images courtesy of Earle's daughter Jessica Reynolds Renshaw (lower left image). Lower right image is screen shot from Google Earth (Street View as of June 2007) at or very near the location of the sinking in 2000.

October 2, 2016 - Gandhi Statue of Peace, Central Park, Davis, California (USA). "A 6-foot-3-inch, 650-pound gift from the Indian government, installed on the UN’s International Day of Non-Violence, has so far been anything but peaceful. What would have been Gandhi’s 147th birthday Sunday put one of the most revered figures of the 20th century on trial as about 75 protesters from throughout Northern & Central California -- many of them Sikhs with grievances against the Indian government -- accused Gandhi of racism, genocide & rape -- everything from the perpetuation of India’s caste system to the creation of the Islamic State... [In his dedication address] Mayor Robb Davis said “Welcome to Davis, Mr. Gandhi, can you become their friend as they hurl their vitriol [referring to the protesters]? We welcome you with some fear and ask you to shield us from the brokenness of our world...” The mayor went on to warn both sides not to indulge in narcissism & asked them, as Gandhi did, “to engage as peacemakers turning the other cheek again and again and again.”

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