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Peace Monuments
Dedicated in 1989

Right click image to enlarge.

April 7, 1989 - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Martin Luther King, Jr., Park, Berkeley, California (USA). Dedicated by Rev. Jesse Jackson. Entry #52 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

May 1989 - Peace Memorial Statue, City Hall (lower lobby), Burlington, Ontario (Canada). "Nagasaki-born Seibo Kitamura [1884-1987], a famous Japanese sculptor, sculpted this bronze statue for Burlington from Mayor Keizo Kurihara of Itabashi (Japan) on the occasion of a twin city agreement in May 1989. By creating international relationships through twinning, the Japanese hope to promote world peace... The sculptor’s words explain the symbolism: "The right hand implies the atomic bombing, the left hand suggests desire for the world peace, and the face prays the bombing victims' souls may rest in peace."

May 24, 1989 - Garden for Peace #2, Tibilisi (Republic of Georgia). Image shows mayors of sister cities Atlanta, Georgia (USA) and Tibilisi (Georgia). Mayor Andrew Young is on the right.

May 30, 1989 - Goddess of Democracy, Tiananmen Square, Beijing (China). "During the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989, Chinese student demonstrators in Beijing built a 10 m image called the Goddess of Democracy, which sculptor Tsao Tsing-yuan said was intentionally dissimilar to the Statue of Liberty to avoid being 'too openly pro-American.' At around the same time, a copy of this statue was made and displayed on Connecticut Avenue in Washington, DC, in a small park across the street from the Chinese Embassy [right image]." The Tiananmen sculpture lasted 5 days, the Washington one a few months.
June 29, 1989 - Bust of Sir William Randal Cremer, Members' Lobby, Parliament, London (England). Unveiled by Mr. Speaker in the centenary year of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), an organisation founded by the UK and French Parliaments. Randal Cremer [1828-1908] co-founded the IPU and received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1903.
1989 - Quaker Tapestry, Friends Meeting House, Kendal, Cumbria (England). A chronicle of Quaker life over 350 years. 77 hand-crafted embroidery panels, beautifully illustrated by 4,000 men, women and children from 15 countries. Click here for Quaker monuments worldwide.
1989 - Templo da Boa Vontade / Temple of Good Will, Brasilia (Brazil). "Shaped like a pyramid of seven faces, in which peak is maintained the biggest crystal ever found in Brazil. According to the maintainers, the best way to capture the energy of the crystal is to walk slowly, barefoot, meditating, following the spyral path inwards; at the center of the spyral [sic], right under the crystal, is the energy focus; then, walk back outwards, stopping before the altar for meditation. This temple is the national headquarter of the Legião da Boa Vontade, and attracts visitors from all religions." "Created by the Legion of Goodwill in 1989 as a symbol of universal solidarity. Incorporates seven pyramids, joined to form a cone that is topped with the biggest raw crystal you will ever see. Inside there's a meditative space." Image courtesy of Francineide Rodrigues, www.aboutbrasilia.com.

1989 - World Wall For Peace (WWFP), Chabot Elementary School, Oakland, California (USA). 644 tiles.Entry #98 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

1989 - Armenian Earthquake, White House, Washington, DC (USA). Statue of a woman holding a child. Gift of the people of Armenia to thank the American Red Cross for their assistance during an earthquake that ravaged Armenia on December 7, 1988. Thousands were killed and tens of thousands left homeless.

1989 - Monument des Droits de l'Homme / Monument of the Rights of Man, Champs de Mars (face à la Rue de Belgrade), Paris (France). Masonic monument "installed on the 200th anniversary of 'La Déclaration des droits de l'Homme et du citoyen.'" // "Inutile de chercher une quelconque indication ou un historique sur son implantation. Il n’y en a pas. On est discret ou on ne l’est pas. Ce monument se devait d’être là et il n’a besoin d’aucune publicité touristique…"
1989 - Statue of National Reconciliation, Klafthmonos Square, Athens (Greece). Celebrates the 40 years from the end of the 1945-49 civil war. Klafthmonos Square means "square of grief," named for civil servants of 19th century who were fired from their state jobs every time the government was changed and gathered there to cry for their fate.

1989 - Armenian Earthquake Statue, American Red Cross Headquarters, Washington, DC (USA). Statue of a woman holding a child. Gift of the people of Armenia to thank the American Red Cross for their assistance during an earthquake that ravaged Armenia on December 7, 1988. Thousands were killed and tens of thousands left homeless.

1989 - World Peace Statue, Helsinki (Finland). "A reminder of cold war in Helsinki. It was 'given' by the city of Moscow just before the collapse of Soviet Union. If Helsinki would have refused the 'gift,' relations with the big neighbour would have suffered." "The artist's name is Oleg Kirjuhin. The statue is actually a copy. Similar copies have been placed in cities around the former Soviet Union. Helsinki might be the only city outside the former Soviet Union that has it's own."
1989 - Civil Rights Memorial (fountain), Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), Montgomery, Alabama (USA). By Maya Lin. A memorial to 40 people who died between 1954 (year of Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education) and 1968 (year of Martin Luther King's assassination.) Civil Rights Memorial Center (CRMC) added in 2005.

1989? - Carll von Ossietzky Monument, Ossietzky Strasse, Berlin-Pankow, East Berlin (Germany). Carl von Orrietzky [1889-1938] received the 1935 Nobel Peace Prize.

1991 - Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg / Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany).
July 1989 - International Conference Center Hiroshima (ICCH), next to Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, Hiroshima (Japan). Five floors (three above ground and two basement floors). Largest hall can accomodate 1,504 persons.

August 26, 1989 - World Peace Bell #3, Cinnah Caddesi, Cankaya, Ankara (Turkey). Scanned left image courtesy of WPBA. One of 20 WPB's placed in 16 different countries by the World Peace Bell Association of Tokyo (Japan).

September 1, 1989 - Weltfrieden / World Peace Bell #4, Friedrichstain, Volkspark, Berlin (Germany). One of 20 WPB's placed in 16 different countries by the World Peace Bell Association of Tokyo (Japan).
September 2, 1989 - World Peace Bell #5, Warsaw Municipal Park, Warsaw (Poland). One of 20 WPB's placed in 16 different countries by the World Peace Bell Association of Tokyo (Japan).

November 6, 1989 - Grass Roots House Peace Museum, 9-11 Masugata, Kochi City, Kochi Prefecture (Japan). "A grass roots approach to peace education and environmental issues." Privately owned by an association of 600 members. Annual exhibiltions on the Kochi air raids.
1989 - Eliza Evans Baker Peace Chapel, Baker-Henry Nature Preserve near Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania (USA). Designed by Maya Lin. Image shows setting sun. Eliza Evans Baker was a peace educator. Juniata College has the Baker Institute of Peace & Conflict Studies (PACS). Entry #869 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

August 12, 1989 – Red Cross Memorial Stone, Dybbøl (Denmark). Sommemorates the first use of the Red Cross symbol in an armed conflict during the Battle of Dybbøl in 1864. Jointly erected in 1989 by the national Red Cross societies of Denmark and Germany.
1989 (and later) – Series of Peace Poles throughout Atlanta, each proclaiming "May Peace Prevail on Earth" in multiple languages. A project of Partnerships in Peace (PIP). Several of the poles were erected just in time for the Olympic Games in the Summer of 1996. .

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