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Quaker Monuments

Click here for "Quakers: Religious Witnesses for Peace since 1660" (many links to Quaker sites).
Click here for Wikipedia article on Quaker Peace Testimony.

Right click image to enlarge.

1652 - Pendle Hill, Borough of Pendle, Lancashire (England). Visited in 1652 by George Fox [1624-1691] leading to his foundation of the Quaker movement. Right image is triangulation piller on top of the hill (nothing to do with Fox).
1930 - Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pennsylvania (USA). Quaker educational center near Philadelphia named for Pendle Hill (England).

After 1690 - Grave of George Fox, Quaker Gardens, London (England). "In keeping with Quaker beliefs in plainness & modesty, his grave has only a simple marker."
1694 - Old Quaker Meeting House, 137-16 Northern Boulevard , Flushing, Queens, New York City, New York (USA). "Remains today much as when it was first built, with dark, warm floorboards, simple benches and hand-hewn timber ceiling beams. By all known accounts, the oldest house of worship in New York State and the second oldest Quaker meeting house in the nation." [Where is the oldest?]
1699 - Quaker Meeting House, Newport, Rhode Island (USA). "Active 1699-1919. Around 1700 about half of Newport's population were Quakers. A stone's throw from the White Horse Tavern, the oldest tavern in America."


1703 - Fair Hill Burial Ground, 2900 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). "Founded in 1703 on part of a grant of land of 16 acres given to the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) by George Fox [1624-1691], who is known as the founder of the Society. He received the land from William Penn [1644-1718] as a gift. The present burial ground was laid out in 1843 and enlarged in 1853, providing almost five acres of green space in this urban neighbohood. Most persons buried at Fair Hill are Quakers, many of them participants in the early abolitionist and women's rights movements. Some of the more renowned include Lucretia Mott [1793-1880], James Mott, Thomas and Mary Ann McClintock, Sarah Pugh, Ann Preston and Edward Parrish. Some colleagues in the anti-slavery movement, not Friends, are also buried there, most notably Robert Purvis [1810-1998], an African-American known as the President of the underground railroad, and his family. The site was recently placed on the National Register for Historic Places."
Circa 1833 - Peaceable Kingdon by Quaker artist Edward Hicks, Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, Massachusetts (USA). Click here for more information on the "kingdoms of Edward Hicks." Probably painted in Pennsylvania. Image shows one of about 60 versions of the Peaceable Kingdom painted by Hicks.

June 4, 1862 - Joseph Sturge Memorial, Swallow Hotel, Five Ways, Birmingham (England). Joseph Sturge [1793-1859] was a Quaker who campaigned tirelessly for peace, even visiting St. Petersburg in an attempt to avert the Crimean War. Memorial was restored & rededicated on March 24, 2007. Left image shows the memorial before & after restoration.
March 2007 - Blue Plaque for Joseph Sturge, 64 Wheeleys Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham (England).
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1866 - Grave of Dr. Thomas Hodgkin, Jaffa (Israel). "Dr. Thomas Hodgkin [1798-1866] "was a a pioneer in preventive medicine...best known for the first account of Hodgkin's disease... He was born to a Quaker family in Pentonville, St. James Parish, Middlesex (England)... He accompanied his close friend [Jewish philanthropist] Sir Moses Montefiore [1784-1885] to Palestine, contracted dysentery, died on 4 April 1866, and was buried in Jaffa." /// Dr. Hodgkin was a great uncle of Quaker medical missionary Henry Theodore Hodgkin [1876-1933] who founded the Fellowship of Reconcilation (FOR) in the UK 1914, founded FOR in the USA in 1915 & served as the first director of Pendle Hill, the Quaker "center for study and contemplation" in Wallingford, Pennsylvania (USA). Date? - Blue Plaque for Dr. Thomas Hodgkin, Bedford Square, London (England). On Hodgkin's house.

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1869 - Ramallah Friends Schools (RFS), Ramallah (Palestine). The Friends Girls' School was inaugurated in 1869; the construction of the Friends Boy's School began in 1901 and opened in 1918. Right image shows director Joyce Ajlouny on June 18, 2011. In the Science Hall dedicated circa January 1998, the "main lecture hall [is] named in honor of Jim Harb [of Knoxville, Tennessee], in recognition of his efforts in the RFS Second Century Campaign and in securing funding for the building through USAID."

1872 - George Fox Memorial, George Fox Lane, Fenny Drayton, Leicestershire (England). Marks the birthplace of George Fox [1624-1691].

October 28, 1893 - Penn Treaty Park, Delaware (Columbus) Avenue & Beach Street, Fishtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). Alleged site of famous peace treaty signed by William Penn [1644-1718] and the Lenape Indians in 1683. Click here for Wikipedia article. See associated virtual PennTreatyMusuem.org. Mentioned by Tom Flores (2008).

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June 1895 - First Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration, Mohonk Mountain House, Lake Mohonk, New Paltz, Ulster County, New York (USA). Convened "to support the cause of international arbitration, arbitration treaties & an international court, and to generate public support on behalf of the cause. Fifty individuals selected by Albert K. Smiley [1828-1912], a Quaker & the owner of Mohonk Mountain House, one of the most prestigious summer resorts of the day, attended the initial sessions at the resort. [The 2nd Mohonk conference was held in June 1896 & the third in June 1897.] Annual conferences soon grew to attract 300 leaders of government, business, religion, the press & education. It was one of the stops of `Abdu'l-Bahá's journeys to the West. After Albert Smiley's death in December 1912, his place as host of the Conferences was taken by his half-brother Daniel Smiley. The last conference was held in 1916. Plans for a 1917 conference were made, but it was never held, partly due to World War I. These meetings were instrumental in the creation of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague (Netherlands) [in 1899]. // From House website: "The Lake Mohonk Conferences on International Arbitration began in 1895 as an attempt to seek world peace. The conferences are credited with having given impetus to the Hague Conference movement, the World Peace Foundation & the League to Enforce Peace. Hundreds of well-known people attended the peace conferences between 1895 and 1916 including William Jennings Bryan & William Howard Taft. It was through his contact and friendship with the Smileys at Mohonk that Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, with Albert K. Smiley as one of its original trustees." // The conference papers were later donated by the Smiley Family to Swarthmore College for study & research." // `Abdu'l-Bahá [1844-1921] was head of the Bahá'íFaith. See Peace Conference in May 1912. /// From Peter van den Dungen, August 2, 20ll: "The Lake Mohonk conferences were a most interesting annual event. On my shelves in hand-reach is a full set of the printed reports of the 22 conferences, together with a most useful analytical 'Index of the proceedings of the Lake Mohonk Conferences on International Arbitration 1895-1914'. I am not sure whether anyone has written their history."

1901 - Statue of William Penn, City Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). 1"1.3-m (37 ft), 27-ton bronze statue of Quaker and Philadelphia founder William Penn [1644-1718]. One of 250 sculptures created by Alexander Milne Calder that adorn the building inside and out. The statue is the tallest atop any building in the world." City Hall is the world's tallest masonry building.

About 1905 - Horfield Quaker Meeting House, 300 Gloucester Road, Horfield, Bristol (England). "A peace garden has been created to celebrate the building's centenary. The latest addition is a panel of colourful tiles [right image], which have transformed a plain brick wall into a work of art. The panel is made up of hand-made tiles spelling out the Quaker principles: 'peace, equality, simplicity, truth,' alongside pictures of animals." Info courtesy of Peter van den Dungen.
October 12, 1907 - George Fox Stone, opposite old Browne homestead, Bowne Avenue, Flushing, Queens Borough, New York, New York (USA). "A large granite monument...was dedicated yesterday to the memory of George Fox [1624-1691], the noted Quaker preacher. Members of the Flushing Historical Society and many Friends were present. The stone bears this inscription: 'Here stood the Fox Oaks, beneath whose branches George Fox, founder of the Society of Friends, preached, June 7, 1672.'" Click here for a description of the historic neighborhood around the stone.
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Date? - Friends Meeting House, Gibara (Cuba). "Sylvester & May Mather Jones arrived in Cuba in 1900 & established a Friends mission in Gibara, where they remained until 1927." /// Photo taken in April 2010.
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Date? - Cuba Friends Meeting House, city? (Cuba).
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Date? - Friends Meeting House, city? (Cuba).

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March 6, 1910 - Friends Meeting House, Ramallah (Palestine). One of the very few Friends meeting houses in the Middle East. In 1948 the buildings and grounds became the home to many Palestinian refugees. On March 6, 2005, exactly 95 years to the day after the dedication, the restored Meetinghouse and Annex were rededicated as a Quaker and community resource. Friends meet every Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. for unprogrammed Meeting for Worship. Everyone is welcome to attend.
Henry Theodore Hodgkin [1876-1933] founds Fellowship of Reconcilation (FOR) in the UK 1914, founds FOR in the USA in 1915 & serves as the first director of Pendle Hill, the Quaker "center for study and contemplation" in Wallingford, Pennsylvania (USA).

1930 - Pendle Hill, 338 Plush Mill Road, Wallingford, Pennsylvania (USA). "A Quaker center for spiritual growth, study and service. At Pendle Hill, students and staff live, work, worship and study together. First director was Henry Theodore Hodgkin [1876-1933] who founded the Fellowship of Reconcilation (FOR) in 1914 in UK and in 1915 in US. Clarence E. Pickett [1884-1965] and Homer Morris lived in houses on the Pendle Hill grounds. Pickett was general secretary of the American Friends Service Committee [1929-1950] and chief of "Stranded Mining and Industrial Populations" for the federal government [in the mid-1930's].
1930? - Swarthmore College Peace Collection, Swarthmore College, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania (USA). Online Exhibits. Swartthore is very close to Pendle Hill.

1943-1968 - Dorothy Hewitt Hutchinson [l905-l984] began to gain influence in the peace movement when her pamphlet "A Call to Peace Now: A Message to the Society of Friends" was printed by the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) in l943. That summer, Hutchinson and a small group of people started the Peace Now Movement, using her pamphlet to rally support for the principle of a negotiated settlement rather than unconditional surrender of the Axis powers. This group included George Wilfried Hartmann [1904-1955], a psychology professor at Columbia, & John Collett. Hutchinson also worked to promote the United Nations and helped organize a local chapter of the United World Federalists [UWF]. Hutchinson was active in the Women's International League for Peace & Freedom [WILPF] & became president of the US Section of WILPF in l96l, serving until l965. She then served as chairman of International WILPF from l965 until l968. Hutchinson was an activist in civil rights & civil liberties as well as in the peace movement.

1947 - American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) receives the Nobel Peace Prize for relief work in Europe during WW-II.

1949 - George Fox University, 414 North Meridian Street,| Newberg, Oregon (USA). Founded in 1891 by Quaker pioneers. Named George Fox College in 1949. Merged with Western Evangelical Seminary & renamed George Fox Univesity in 1996.

1953 - Quaker House, New York City, New York (USA). "A four story brownstone just blocks from the United Nations Headquarters, which has served as an informal meeting space for the UN community since 1953. Given to Quaker United Nations Office-New York (QUNO) by a small group of donors to support a permanent Quaker presence at the UN, the house has become an integral part of the program work of the QUNO office."




Click here to see
the Phoenix today.
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1954 - "Phoenix of Hiroshima," North Fork of Mokelumne River, off Tyler Island, Lodi, California (USA?). "John Gardner (phoenixofhiroshima @comcast.net, 209-570-4070) has already rescued the Phoenix after seeing it listed for free on craigslist [in late 2006 or early 2007], its San Francisco owner simply wanting to get rid of it to avoid paying any more fees to the Oyster Point Marina. Gardner paid a San Francisco boater to tow it to its current location." Constructed in Hiroshima (Japan) by American Quaker Earle Reynolds [1910-1998] (top image). "1954 brought the realization of a dream for Reynolds when he, his first wife Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990], and their three children began an around the world voyage on the Phoenix. They stopped at over one hundred ports, and Earle gave lectures on conditions in Hiroshima. Young Jessica [middle image] documented this trip in her book, which was later published [1958]. When they arrived in Hawaii in 1958, they met the crew of the Golden Rule (qv), Quakers who were on trial for their attempt to sail into the nuclear test zone near Bikini Island to protest nuclear weapons and atmospheric testing. They had been arrested and prevented from completing their mission. After talking with the crew of the Golden Rule, Dr. Reynolds and his family decided to complete the mission in their place. He also believed that the government did not have a right to restrict access to the open ocean. After sailing into the restricted zone, he was arrested and sentenced to two years in prison. This verdict was appealed and eventually overturned." Earle Reynolds founded the Peace Resource Center at the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) in 1975. Barbara Reynolds founded the World Friendship Center in Hiroshima (Japan) in 1965 and the Peace Resource Center at Wilmington College, Ohio, in 1975.



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1958? - "Golden Rule," Eureka, California (USA). Now out of water and for sale by Leon Zerlang (humtug@gmail.com). Asking price is $9,500. Email Jan. 19, 2010 from Wendy E. Chmielewski, PhD, George Cooley Curator, Swarthmore College Peace Collection, Swarthmore. Pennsylvania (USA): "The sailing ship that in 1958 [Quakers] Albert Bigelow [1906-1993], James Peck [1914-1993], George Willoughby [1914-2010] (who just passed away two weeks ago), attempted to sail into the atomic testing grounds near the Marshall Islands. The ship has been repossessed by Leon Zerlang, the ship yard owner (from the bankrupt actual owner). Leon is aware of the ship's history and would like to help save The Golden Rule, but needs ideas and help on what to do to save this ship. Several years ago I received an almost identical email from another ship owner trying to save The Phoenix (qv), a sailing ship with a similar history. I don't know the fate of The Phoenix. It would be a shame to lose still another piece of peace movement history. Ideally something like The Golden Rule, a beautiful sailing ship, should be preserved by the Smithsonian, but I don't know that they have any interest in it." Right image shows Earle Reynolds [1910-1998], his second wife Akie Nagami, Phil Drath, Betty Boardman, Bob Eaton, Horace Champhy, and Ivan Massar embarking from Misaki, Kanagawa (Japan) on February 16, 1967, en route to North Vietnam with medical supplies. "In 1959, Bigelow published a book, "Voyage of the Golden Rule: An Experiment with Truth," which documented his journey. The story would go on to inspire fellow Quaker Marie Bohlen to suggest the use of a similar tactic to members of the Vancouver-based Don't Make a Wave Committee (later to become Greenpeace) in 1970."

1959 - Statue of Mary Dyer, Massachusetts State House, Boston, Massachusetts (USA). By Quaker sculptor Sylvia Shaw Judson "The Massachusetts legislature enacted a law that every Quaker in its jurisdiction should be banished on pain of death. Mary Dyer [c1611-1660] was hanged in May 1660 for re-entering that colony, rather than abandon the principles of freedom of speech and conscience." Copies are in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, & Richmond, Indiana.

1962 - Statue of Mary Dyer, Stout Meeting House, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana (USA). "The Massachusetts legislature enacted a law that every Quaker in its jurisdiction should be banished on pain of death. Mary Dyer [c1611-1660] was hanged in May 1660 for re-entering that colony, rather than abandon the principles of freedom of speech and conscience." Original of this statue is is Boston, Massachusetts; another copy is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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August 6, 1965 - World Friendship Center (WFC), 8-10 Higashi Kan-on, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima (Japan). Founded on 20th anniversary of the bomb by American Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990] who also founded the Peace Resources Center (PRC) at Wilmington College of Ohio (USA) in 1975. "Not only a 'home away from home' for travelers to Hiroshima, it is a place where local Hiroshima residents volunteer their hospitality of peace in a variety of activities." Supported by Brethren Volunteer Service (BVS) & by the American Committee of the WFC, currently chaired by Mary Ann Albert of Warsaw, Indiana (USA).
1969 - Quaker House, 223 Hillside Avenue, Fayetteville, North Carolina (USA). Near Fort Bragg. Slogan: "YES To The Troops. NO To The Wars."

1972 - Quaker House Geneva, 13 avenue du Mervelet (near Petit Saconnex), Geneva (Switzerlnd). "Quaker work at the United Nations in Geneva is greatly enhanced by the facility where its offices are located and where much of its programme with diplomats and others actually takes place. Located in a pleasant residential neighbourhood not very far from the Palais des Nations, Quaker House is not only home for the Quaker UN Office but also serves as the Meeting House for the Geneva Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends and provides meeting space for a range of other groups.
May 1974 - Lucretia C. Mott historical marker, Pennsylvania highway 611 north of Cheltenham Avenue, Elkins Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania (USA). Text: "Nearby stood 'Roadside," the home of the ardent Quakeress Lucretia C. Mott [1793-1880]. Her most notable work was in connection with antislavery women's rights, temperance and peace." Said to be the most important woman abolitionist in America.

1974 - Friends Center, 15th & Cherry Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). Three buildings including the 1856 Race Street Meetinghouse, site of Quaker witness from the abolition of slavery, to women’s rights, to binding up the wounds of war. Houses 19 nonprofit organizations that bring approximately 300 workers and 75 children to the Center each day. "You can browse through literature provided by the Quaker Information Center, look at the lobby displays provided by groups such as the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), or take a moment to sit quietly in the worship room."

1975 - Statue of Mary Dyer, Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). "The Massachusetts legislature enacted a law that every Quaker in its jurisdiction should be banished on pain of death. Mary Dyer [c1611-1660] was hanged in May 1660 for re-entering that colony, rather than abandon the principles of freedom of speech and conscience." Original of this statue is is Boston, Massachusetts; another copy is in Richmond, Indiana.

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August 6, 1975 - Peace Resource Center (PRC), Wilmington College of Ohio, Wilmington, Ohio (USA). "Has "the world's largest collection (outside of Japan) of reference materials related to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima & Nagasaki." Founded by Barbara Leonard Reynolds who also founded the World Friendship Center (WFC) in Hiroshima (Japan) in 1965. Entry #820 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001). One of 27 US museums in "Museums for Peace Worldwide" edited by Kazuyo Yamane (2008).
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Date? - Quaker Heritage Center (QHC), 1870 Quaker Way, Wilmington, Ohio (USA). One of 27 US museums in "Museums for Peace Worldwide" edited by Kazuyo Yamane (2008).


Memorial Day 1976 - Whittier Peace Memorial, Civic Center, Whittier, California (USA). " Inscribed: "Dedicated to world peace in grateful memory of those who have given up their lives in the past wars in order that we may live in peace." /// "This wording is consistent with the philosophy of Whittier’s first settlers, the Quakers, who did not believe in memorializing war, but who gave honor to those who fought in defense of others."/// "The names of 157 men who were killed, & two missing in action in Vietnam, are listed on 3 bronze plaques. The 4th plaque contains the dedication & Whittier Bicentennial logo. The sundial represents the world as a hollow sphere with the equatorial band parallel to the equator. Parallel to the axis of the earth and pointing to the North Star is the arrow, or gnomon, it casts a shadow on the equatorial band indicating the time & was designed to fit local time changes. The memorial was designed by the architect William H. Harrison."" /// "Renovated in 2010 and re-dedicated on November 11, 2010 (lower image), "in honor of those already named on the monument [residents who died in four wars in the last century: World War I, World War II, Korea & Vietnam] as well as those who have died in recent military action... A curving white wall highlights the Memorial, which will also be surrounded by flags--the US Flag, flags of all the branches of the American military groups and the POW Flag."

1983 - World Wall for Peace (WWPF), Berkeley, California (USA). - Founded by Carolyna Marks [1942-2011], artist, teacher & peace activist. See obituaries here & here. Sponsored WWFP's in 6 states, Russia, Israel, Japan & South Africa. See special section at end of page for peace walls.
1989 - Quaker Tapestry, Friends Meeting House, Kendal, Cumbria, England (UK). A chronicle of Quaker life over 350 years. 77 hand-crafted embroidery panels, beautifully illustrated by 4,000 men, women and children from 15 countries. Click here for Wikipedia article.

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1994 - Underground Railroad Memorial, near W.K. Kellogg Manor House, off of West Van Buren Street, Battle Creek, Michigan (USA). "The nation's largest monument to the Underground Railroad. The 28 foot long & 14 foot high bronze statue was made possible by the generosity of the WK Kellogg Foundation & Glenn A. Cross Estate. The lovely park like setting with flower-lined pathways showcases the beauty of the statue. A information kiosk is on site to provide information. Honors the men & women who operated the Underground Railroad. Foremost figures are Harriet Tubman [1822-1913] & Quaker Erastus Hussey [1800-1889], a local "conductor" of the Underground Railroad. (Sarah Hussey is one of the figures on the side of the memorial.) Harriet Tubman never came to Battle Creek." /// See paper by Anthony Patrick Glesner (1995).
1995 - Vietnamese-American Peace Park, 30 miles north of Hanoi (Viet-Nam). A project of the Madison Quakers. At site of the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968. Image shows Dove Mound, inspired by the Native American mound at the Highground Veterans Memorial Park, Neillsville, Wisconsin (USA).
1996 - Jane Addams Memorial Park, 600 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois (USA). Honors Jane Addams [1860-1935], founder of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and first US woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize (1931). Park includes black granite statue "Helping Hands" by Louis Bourgeois. Entry #272 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
October 26, 1996 - Civilian Public Service historical marker, Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). "Commissioned by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission." Honors "some 12,000 men who were classified as conscientious objectors to war...during World War II."

November 6, 1999 - Historical Marker honoring the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). The AFSC and the Friends Service Council (UK) shared a Nobel Peace Prize in 1947. Clarance Pickett accepted the prize on behalf of the AFSC.

2000 - Traces Center for History and Culture, Landmark Center, 75 West Fifth Street (Suite 211), St. Paul, Minnesota (USA). Traces "preserves and present stories of people from the Midwest and Germany or Austria who encountered each other during World War II." It is "a peace project presenting itself as a history museum," according o founder/executive director Michael Luick-Thrams. Traces has six exhibits documenting Friends' responses to the Holocaust: AFSC's refugee centers at Scattergood Hostel [in Iowa] and at Quaker Hill in Richmond, Indiana; Leonard Kenworthy's year in wartime Berlin helping would-be refugees get out of the Third Reich; Clarence Pickett's two fact-finding tours to Nazi Germany; and others. Clarence Pickett [1884-1965] accepted the 1947 Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). Landmark Center is a former Federal courthouse, built circa 1896, around a six-story neoclassical Victorian atrium. Click here for an article by the founder.

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May 2001? - "In Pursuit of Peace: An Exhibit From the Earle and Akie Reynolds Archive," University Library, University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC), Santa Cruz, California (USA). "This is an on-line exhibit covering the life of peace activists, Earle and Akie Reynolds. 'It is not only the story of Earle and Akie Reynolds, but also of Barbara Leonard Reynolds, Ted Reynolds, and Jessica Reynolds [Renshaw], and the decisions and events that changed their lives. The archive itself contains a range of materials including correspondence, manuscripts, video and audio tapes, scrapbooks, nautical maps, photo albums and artifacts, all of which attest to the passion and dedication of the Reynolds' pursuit of peace. This virtual exhibit hopes to capture some of the excitement of discovery that the processing team felt in unraveling the stories contained within the archive.'"

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August 6, 2008 - "Stories of Hope," permanent exhibit at Peace Resource Center (PRC), Wilmington College of Ohio, Wilmington, Ohio (USA). Highlights four stories: PRC founder Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990], Sadako Sasaki [1943-1955], the Hiroshima Maidens, and Dr. Takashi Nagai [1908-1951], the first published writer of the A-Bomb experience. The PRC has "the world's largest collection (outside of Japan) of reference materials related to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki." Entry #820 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001). One of 27 US museums in "Museums for Peace Worldwide" edited by Kazuyo Yamane (2008).

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2008 - "The Middle-East Dialogue Quilt," Friends Meeting House, Ramallah (Palestine). Created in Boston & transported to Ramallah by Jim Harb of Knoxville, Tennessee. Now hung on the front wall of the meeting house. /// Bottom image shows Marina Shaw, Bill Shaw & Kathy Bergen holding FCNL brochure from the Dayton International Peace Museum, of which Bill is president. Presiding clerk Jean Zaru is at left in both images. Both photos taken June 18, 2011.
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July 3, 2008 - "Occupied with Nonviolence: A Palestinian Woman Speaks" by Jean Zaru, Fortress Press, Minneapolis, pp. 144. "Vividly paints the complex realities faced by all parties in Palestine — Jews & Muslims & Christians, Israelis & Palestinians, women & men. Yet even as Zaru eloquently names the common misunderstandings of the history, present situation, & current policies of the parties there, she vividly articulates an alternative: a religiously motivated nonviolent path to peace & justice in the world's most troubled region."

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September 20, 2009 - "Who Sends Thee?," between Watson Library and the Meriam R. Hare Quaker Heritage Center, Wilmington College, Wilmington, Ohio (USA). "750-pound bronze statue features Quakers and tells a uniquely Quaker story. Indeed, members of the Society of Friends were behind much of its $84,000 fundraising effort... Reflects the Quaker Testimonies of peace, integrity, simplicity, community and equality. Depicts locals Quakers, Isaac and Sarah Harvey, on their way to Washington D.C. to speak with President Abraham Lincoln about the emancipation of enslaved persons in 1862."

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May 23, 2011 - Plaque, William Penn Square, directly behind the Protestant Church, Saumur, Maine-et-Loire (France). "A series of events in May 2011 will commemorate the presence of William Penn [1644-1718] as a student in Saumur [1662-1664]. A square directly behind the Protestant church – a scheduled national monument – on the edge of the old town near the quarter where the Protestant Academy used to be located is to be named after William Penn. There will be a public day of lectures, readings and other activities culminating in the naming." ("Saumur saw its climax during the 17th century as it became one of the centres of Protestantism.")

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June 12, 2011 - Barbara Reynolds Monument, Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima (Japan). Adjacent to the Norman Cousins and Marcel Junod monuments (seen at left in second image). Inscription: "I, too, am a Hibakusha. Hibakushas, that is the start of my peacemaking and everything. My heart is always with Hiroshima. I pray that humankind will hear and that their hearts may be moved to renounce war and preparations for war forever." Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990] founded the World Friendship Center (WFC) in Hiroshima and the Peace Resource Center (PRC) in Wilmington, Ohio (USA). See web pages about boats & ships and about peace monumemts in Hiroshoma for the boat "Phoenix of Hiroshima" which Reynolds and her family built in Hiroshima in 1954. Click here for additional information.
Future - San Diego Friends Center, 3850 Westgate Place, San Diego, California (USA). Energy efficient straw bale building. "A unique collaboration between two historic peace churches and two well-established and respected non-profit organizations in the San Diego area: American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), Peace Resource Center of San Diego (PRC), San Diego First Church of the Brethren, and San Diego Friends Meeting (Quakers)."
Future - Quaker Memorial, National Arboretum, Staffordshire (England). "The idea is coming closer to reality. The Quaker Service Memorial trustees are looking to extend their number beyond the present four appointed by Staffordshire Area Meeting, at the same time as we build up our fundraising appeal beyond the £22,000 raised so far. The memorial should be completed in twelve months’ time, when the outreach programme will begin." [From "the Friend," September 1, 2011] /// N.B. "There are over 150 memorials and plots in the arboretum for the armed forces, civilian organisations & voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving the country. A number of corporate war memorials - from British banks, building societies & insurance companies - are also located in the grounds. At the heart of the arboretum is the Armed Forces Memorial, which is a tribute to almost 16,000 service personnel who have lost their lives in conflict or as a result of terrorism since the end of the Second World War."

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