Please email your comments & questions to geovisual at comcast.net. Thank you.

Peace Monuments
in New York City &
New York State (USA)

Click here for peace monuments at the United Nations in New York City.
Click here for website showing sculptures in New York City.
Click here for another website showing sculptures in New York City (Gino & Leslie).

N.B. This web page has two parts: (1) New York City and (2) Remainder of New York State.

(1) New York City

Right click image to enlarge.
1694 - Old Quaker Meeting House, 137-16 Northern Boulevard , Flushing, Queens, New York City, New York (USA). "Remains today much as when it was first built, with dark, warm floorboards, simple benches and hand-hewn timber ceiling beams. By all known accounts, the oldest house of worship in New York State and the second oldest Quaker meeting house in the nation." [Where is the oldest?]
1895 - "Peace, Truth, Honesty, Fortitude, Self-Denial, Fidelity," original American Surety Building, 100 Broadway, just north of Wall Street, New York City, New York (USA). By John Massey Rhind. On second-floor level. Ground floor is presently occupied by Borders Books.

T
O
M
B
April 27, 1897 - Grant's Tomb, Morningside Heights , New York City, New York (USA). "The largest mausoleum in North America. The bodies of Ulysses S. Grant [1822-1885], the Union Civil War General & 18th President of the U.S., and his wife Julia Dent Grant are entombed there. The phrase 'Let us have peace' greets visitors at the entrance of the mausoleum. It is taken from Grant’s words in his 1885 memoirs. Inside, there’s a mural of the two generals [Lee & Grant] shaking hands."

May 30, 1901 - Hall of Fame for Great Americans, Bronx Community College, The Bronx, New York City, New York (USA). "An outdoor sculpture gallery. completed in 1900 as part of the University Heights campus of New York University, the 630-foot (192 m) stone colonnade half-encircles the university library & houses 98 bronze portrait busts [added every few years until 1976]. Designed by architect Stanford White [1853-1906] (who also designed the library), the Beaux Arts structure was donated by Helen Gould [1868-1938], and was formally dedicated on May 30, 1901. New York University vacated the campus in 1973, the same year that Bronx Community College took possession. Though the Hall's renown has itself faded, its architecture remains, & it stands as a secular national shrine not just to great men & woman, but to Roman ideals of fame favored at the beginning of the 20th century." /// Among the 98 busts are those of peacemakers Abraham Lincoln, Horace Mann, Henry Ward Beecher, Mary Lyon, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Susan B. Anthony, Henry David Thoreau, Jane Addams, Clara Barton & Andrew Carnegie.

May 30, 1903 - "Goddess of Victory" (statue of William Tecumseh Sherman), Central Park, New York City, New York (USA). "At the statue, which is mounted on an 11-foot-high pedestal, David McCullough exclaims, 'Isn't it great! Look at that face! It's the face of a madman! Grim and pockmarked...the very image of the horrors of war!' Sherman, celebrated & reviled for his brutal 1864 march from Atlanta to the sea, is famous for saying 'War is hell.' McCullough likes to recite the lesser known part of Sherman's speech: 'I am tired and sick of war. Its glory is all moonshine.' McCullough lingers on the word moonshine. 'And look, there's the (horse's upraised) foot that gave [sculptor] Augustus Saint-Gaudens [1848-1907] so much trouble.' But what McCullough likes best about the statue is the figure in front of Sherman, a barefooted, winged goddess of Victory. She clutches a palm branch in her left hand and reaches out with her right hand, as if leading the way for Sherman. 'She makes it great,' McCullough says, noting the contrast between war-weary Sherman & Victory's youth and beauty. 'But there is no joy, no gleam of triumph or glory in her expression. Her eyes are wide, her mouth open, as if she was under a spell.' McCullough adds, 'She was African American (a 24-year-old model from South Carolina named Hettie Anderson). No one knows that!'"
October 12, 1907 - George Fox Stone, opposite old Browne homestead, Bowne Avenue, Flushing, Queens Borough, New York City, New York (USA). "A large granite monument...was dedicated yesterday to the memory of George Fox [1624-1691], the noted Quaker preacher. Members of the Flushing Historical Society and many Friends were present. The stone bears this inscription: 'Here stood the Fox Oaks, beneath whose branches George Fox, founder of the Society of Friends, preached, June 7, 1672.'" Click here for a description of the historic neighborhood around the stone.
February 1914 - Church Peace Union (CPU), Merrill House 170 East 64th Street, New York City, New York (USA). "The CCEIA was founded in New York City in 1914, when Andrew Carnegie [1835-1919] assembled a group of leaders in religion, academia and politics and appointed them trustees of an organization named the Church Peace Union (CPU). Through the CPU, Carnegie hoped to mobilize the world's churches, religious organizations and other spiritual and moral resources to join in promoting moral leadership and finding alternatives to armed conflict. William P. Merrill [1867-1954], pastor of New York's Brick [Presbyterian] Church, became the first president of the CPU. The timing of its founding was significant. On the very eve of World War I, Carnegie sought to make war obsolete for all time. For its inaugural international event, the CPU sponsored a conference to be held on August 1, 1914, [at Lindau] on the shores of Lake Constance in southern Germany. As the delegates made their way to the conference by train, Germany was invading Belgium... In 1961, the CPU was renamed Council on Religion & International Affairs (CRIA)... In 2005, the Council changed its name to Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs (CCEIA)."

M
E
M
O
R
I
A
L
1915 - Memorial to W. T. Stead, Central Park (one block north of Engineers' Gate), New York City, New York (USA). Sculpted by Sir George Frampton [1860-1928]. William Thomas Stead [1849-1912] was "the first truly modern journalist." According to Peter van den Dungen, Stead was an important figure at the 1899 & 1907 Hague peace conferences, and he died on the Titanic en route to a peace conference in the USA. Click here for a 1907 New York Times article about Stead. An identical plaque with a different inscription is on Victoria Embankment, London (qv).
M
E
M
O
R
I
A
L
1913 - Memorial to W. T. Stead, River Parapet, Victoria Embankment, London (England). Sculpted by Sir George Frampton [1860-1928]. William Thomas Stead [1849-1912] was "the first truly modern journalist." Stead was an important figure at the 1899 & 1907 Hague peace conferences, and he died on the Titanic en route to a peace conference in the USA. One of 309 London monuments in Kershman (2007), page 123. An identical plaque with a different inscription is in Central Park, New York City (qv).
P
L
A
Q
U
E
Date? - Plaque, Embleton, Northumberland (England). Text of plaque: "William Thomas Stead, 1849-1912, world renowned journalist and apostle of peace, was born here, July 5th 1849." Information & image courtesy of Colin Archer, general secretary, International Peace Bureau (IPB), Geneva (Switzerland).
December 6, 1915 - Statue of Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc Park, Riverside Drive at 93nd Street, New York City, New York (USA). "The Maid of Orleans is standing in her stirrups, sword raised as if to cut away some of the summer boughs that nearly hide her from view. She is in armor and pointed west, as though the English had taken up positions across the river in New Jersey... This is the first statue of a woman -- not a female abstraction -- erected in New York, and the first by a female sculptor, Anna Vaughn Hyatt [1876-1973]... Behind nearly every speech [at the dedication] was the thought of the European war. The statue was raised -- a little late -- to commemorate the 500th anniversary of Joan’s birth in January 1412. The 600th anniversary, in a barely more peaceful world, is just around the corner. We wonder what celebrations are in store." [from a New York Times editorial, 25Aug10] Copies in Gloucester, MA, & Blois (France)?

1918 - " Washington in Peace," Washington Square Arch, Greenwich Village, New York City, New York (USA). Accompanied by "Wisdom and Justice." /// "On the west pier of Stanford White's Washington Square Arch is Alexander Stirling Calder's Washington in Peace. Alexander Stirling Calder [1870-1945] was the father of the noted artist Alexander Calder [1898-1976]."
1921 - "Victory With Peace" Statue, Freedom Square, Bushwick, Myrtle & Willoughby Avenues, Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York City, New York (USA). Square named in 1919. Monument depicts Nike, the Greek Goddess of Victory, leaning forward with an olive branch, the symbol of peace. Memorializes Brooklyn’s losses during World War I. Sculpted by Pietro Montana [1890-1978]. The face of Nike was modeled after Claudia Deloney, a Hollywood actress and friend of film star Gloria Swanson [1899-1983].

1923 - Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site, National Park Service (NPS), 28 East 20th Street (between Park Avenue South & Broadway), New York City, New York (USA). Demolished in 1916. Rebuilt in 1919 by the Women's Roosevelt Memorial Association. Rededicated in 1923 and subsequently refurbished with many furnishings from the original house by the President's widow, Edith, and his two sisters. Theodore Roosevelt [1858-1919] was US President 1901-1909 and received the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize.
March 24, 1924 - First Roerich Museum, 310 Riverside Drive, New York City, New York (USA). "At the time, the only museum in America dedicated to the work of a single artist. Soon afterwards, this mansion was demolished, and in its place in 1929 was built a 29-storey skyscraper, called Master Building (see below)."

1927 - Peace & Victory Monument, Crandall Park on upper Glen Street, Queensbury, New York (USA). "A bronze figure sculpted by Bruce Wilder Scoville in New York City is a tribute to the men from the Town of Queensbury and the City of Glens Falls who gave their lives from the Civil War to the Korean War. Names have been added over time."
1948 - Peace Monument, Potter's Field, Hart Island, East River, Bronx, New York City, New York (USA). "The inmates on the island who spent long hours digging grave petitioned for permission to build a monument for those interred on the island. With permission granted, both prisoners and staff cooperated to create a thirty-foot memorial in 1948.The Hart Island memorial monument some decades ago. The word "peace" is inscribed on one side and a simple cross on the other."

October 1929 - Roerich "Skyscraper-Museum," Master Building, Riverside Drive, New York City, New York (USA). "On the first three floors were situated all the Roerich Institutions, including the Museum, and on all the other floors were apartments for rent to students, teachers, and anyone who wanted to be part of a cultural community." Designed by Harvey Wiley Corbett [1873-1954], the skyscraper "is uniquely graduated in tone from deep purple at the base to white at the top, symbolizes 'growth,' houses more than 1,000 of Prof. Roerich's exotic paintings, is dedicated to international culture, world peace." Click here for a colorful account of the museum's official opening in Time Magazine. Click here for more information. Museum ended in 1938 (click here for more information). N.B. In 1921, Corbett designed the Peace Arch (qv) between British Columbia (Canada) & Washington state (USA).

1939 - "Four Victories of Peace" Statue, Court of Power, 1939-1940 New York World's Fair, New York City, New York (USA). Designed by by John Gregory [1879-1958]. Depicted four female figures representing Wheels, Wings, Wheat & Wisdom. Note Perisphere & Trylon and Helicline in background of the images. What became of this statue?

1949 - Nicholas Roerich Museum, 319 West 107th Street (Upper West Side), New York City, New York (USA). Occupies house built in 1898. Click here for a good description of the museum (and its predecessor) written by a visiting Russian.
September 11, 1955 - Statue of Shinran Shonin, 331 Riverside Drive, New York City, New York (USA). Shinran [1173-1263] is founder of the Jodo Shinshu (Pure Land) school of Buddhism. This statue was in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Presented to the USA by Seiichi Hirose of Takarazuka, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan, as "a testimonial to the atomic bomb devastation and a symbol of lasting hope for world peace."

"Broken Obelisk:" Four identical monuments by Barnett Newman [1905-1970]. Each is 6,000 pounds of Corten steel more than 25 feet high -- a pyramid topped by a reversed obelisk ascending yet torn, or 'broken,' at its top, obviously some kind of symbolic object roughly resembling traditional monuments of combined pyramid and obelisk. Newman himself described the sculpture in terms conventional to his art: 'It is concerned with life, and I hope I have transformed its tragic content into a glimpse of the sublime.'"
1963 - Broken Obelisk, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden, Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), 11 West 53rd Street, New York City, New York (USA). A sculpture by Barnett Newman. Four versions of it exist.

1963 - Broken Obelisk, Central Plaza (Red Square), near Suzallo Library, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (USA).

February 27, 1971 - Broken Obelisk, Rothko Chapel, Houston, Texas (USA). First exhibited in front of the Seagram Building in New York City, and then the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. In 1969, Houson city officials said they would reject this as a public memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. [1929-1968]. Dominique & John de Menil proposed that it be placed in front of City Hall with the words "Forgive Them, for They Know Not What They Do" before erecting it permanently at the Rothko Chapel.
2003 - Broken Obelisk, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (Germany). A fourth was cast in 2003 by permission of the Barnett Newman Foundation and temporarily installed in front of the Neue Nationalgalerie.

1964 - "Freedom of the Human Spirit," New York World's Fair, Flusing Meadow, Queens New York City, New York (USA). By Marshall W. Fredericks [1908-1998]. Moved in 1996 to the main entrance of the Arthur Ashe Stadium, National Tennis Center (NTC), also in Flushing (right image). The artist made a second casting of the 28-foot tall sculpture in 1986, and it was installed in his hometown, Birmingham, Michigan (left image).
1969 - "The Sphere" (World Peace Monument), Battery Park, New York City, New York (USA). Designed by Fritz Koenig of Germany. Commissioned by Port Authority of New York & New Jersey to symbolize world peace through world trade. Stood in the plaza between the two World Trade Center (WTC) towers. Damaged on September 11, 2001. Left unrepaired & moved to Battery Park as a memorial to victims of 9/11. September 11, 2002, "Mayor Michael Bloomberg joined Afghan President Hamid Karzai & officials from about 90 foreign nations at its base to light an eternal flame. Nearly a decade later, the flame could possibly be snuffed out, and there is no permanent plan for the 25-foot-high structure made of bronze & steel. Officials said [in early April 2012] that it will be removed by the end of the month to make way for renovations to Battery Park. Some family members of those killed have gathered thousands of signatures in an online petition urging officials to incorporate the sculpture into the 9/11 memorial & return it to the spot where it once stood as a centerpiece of a 5-acre plaza."
G
R
A
V
E
1971? - Grave of Ralph Bunche, Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York City (USA). Ralph Bunche [1903-1971] was acting UN mediator on Palestine. After eleven months of virtually ceaseless negotiating, he obtained signatures on armistice agreements between Israel & the Arab States. Bunche returned home to a hero's welcome. New York City gave him a 'ticker tape' parade up Broadway; Los Angeles declared a 'Ralph Bunche Day." He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950 & died December 10, 1971, at age 68. Only inscription on headstone is "BUNCHE" & two olive branches.
1975 - Isaiah Wall, Ralph Bunch Park, East 43rd Street & First Avenue, New York City, New York (USA). Quotes Isaiah 2:4: "They shall beat their swords into plowshares." Shadow in image is cast by adjacent "Peace Form One." Entry #718 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
G
R
O
V
E
July 8, 1976 - Jerusalem Grove, Battery Park, New York City, New York (USA). "Grove of 11 Blue Atlas Cedars (Cedrus atlantica 'Glauca') with inscribed horizontal marker. A gift from the City of Jersualem" (Israel). A US bicentennial project?
M
U
S
E
U
M
1977 - Anne Frank Center USA, 38 Crosby Street (5th floor), New York City, New York (USA). "A not-for-profit organization that promotes the universal message of tolerance by developing & disseminating a variety of educational programs, including exhibitions, workshops & special events." /// "A partner organization of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam. Uses the diary and spirit of Anne Frank [1929-1945] as unique tools to advance her legacy [including] the North American Traveling Exhibition Program, the Exhibition and Education Center in New York City, the annual Spirit of Anne Frank Awards..." See Video & Website. See other Anne Frank organizaitons in Basel, Berlin, London & Verein (Austria).

B
O
O
K
Apsel, Joyce A. (2005), "After Seventy Years: Anne Frank (1929-1945)," Anne Frank Center USA, SoHo, New York City (USA).
1978 - Peace Pentagon (Muste Building), A.J. Muste Memorial Institute, 339 Lafayette Street, New York City, New York (USA). Organized in 1974 to carry forward the commitment of A. J. Muste [1885-1967] to nonviolent radical change, the institute bought the "Peace Pentagon" office building in 1978 to provide a stable and affordable base for itself and other activist groups in New York City. Now in need of major repairs and in danger of being sold. Click here for "Save the Peace Pentagon."
1980 - "Peace Form One", Ralph Bunch Park, East 43rd Stret & First Avenue, New York City, New York (USA). Stainless-steel obelisk 50 feet (15 meters) high, honoring Ralph Bunche [1903-1971]. Adjacent to the Isaiah Wall. The sculptor, Daniel Larue Johnson, was a personal friend of Bunche, and dedicated the sculpture to Bunche, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950.Entry #731 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
March 21, 1984 - John Lennon Memorial, Strawberry Fields, Central Park, New York City, New York (USA). Reproduction of a mosaic from Pompeii. Gift from the city of Naples (Italy). Dedicated by Yoko Ono on what would have been Lennon's 45th birthday. Entrance on Central Park West at West 72nd Street, directly across from the Dakota Apartments, where Lennon lived for the latter part of his life and where he was murdered.

February 27, 1985 - "Offering of the Sacred Pipe," US Mission to the United Nations, New York City, New York (USA). Monumental bronze by Native American artist Allan Houser [1914-1994]. "Has become a worldwide symbol of peace." Duplicate of statues in Scottsdale, Arizona, & Albuquerque, New Mexico (qv).
1985 - Peace Fountain, Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, Morningside Heights, New York City, New York (USA). By Greg Wyatt, sculptor-in-residence at the Cathedral. "The sculpture depicts the struggle of good and evil, as well as a battle between the Archangel Michael and Satan. The sculpture also contains the Sun, the Moon, and several animals. Although it is called a fountain, there is currently no water on the site." Entry #732 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

1986 - Statue of Mahatma Gandhi, Union Square Park, 14th Street at Broadway, New York City, New York (USA). Entry #701 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
1986 - Peace Table #1 for USA, Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City, New York (USA). By mastercraftsman George Nakashima [1905-1990] of New Hope, Pennsylvania (USA). Dedicated with a concert for Peace conducted by Leonard Bernstein.
H
O
U
S
E
M
U
S
E
U
M
1988 - Lower East Side Tenement Museum, 97 Orchard Street, New York, NY (USA). "Built on Manhattan's Lower East Side in 1863, this tenement apartment building was home to nearly 7000 working class immigrants. They faced challenges we understand today -- making a new life, working for a better future, starting a family with limited means. In recognizing the importance of this seemingly ordinary building, the Tenement Museum has re-imagined the role that museums can play in our lives." Video | Website | National Park Service (NPS).
August 28, 1989 - Bayard Rustin Plaque, Ralph Bunch Park, East 43rd Street & First Avenue, New York City, New York (USA). Honors Bayard Rustin [1912-1987]. Quote on plaque: "The principal factors which influenced my life are non-violent tactics; constitutional means; democratic procedures; respect for human personality; a belief that all people are one." Entry #681 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

M
U
R
A
L
1995 - Centro de La Paz / Peace Place, East 124th Street, East Harlem, New York City (USA). "Painted after a previous mural was demolished to make room for a grocery store. The image is based on what a perfect city would look like in the students eyes. /// "I came across a remarkable mural that covers six storeys of a tenement building wall... The mural was sponsored by the Creative Arts Workshop (CAW) & painted by more than 200 New Yorkers, many of them poor neighbourhood youngsters. Their efforts were augmented by some 100 artists from around the world – Argentina, Ecuador, Nigeria, England & elsewhere. The names of the artists are duly inscribed on a two-storey-high scroll that is part of the mural. It features skyscrapers, igloos, pyramids, and the Grand Canyon. In a city with hundreds of murals, this one definitely stands out – in scope, design, beauty & size. The many immigrant groups depicted & the themes of unity, diversity & tolerance encompass the aspirations & hopes of the millions of immigrants who have come to New York City since its inception & who have shaped it into one of the greatest cities in the world. [William B Helmreich, The Independent, UK, 26Oct2013]"
1998 - "Hope,", Raoul Wallenberg Walk, First Avenue at East 47th Street, New York City, New York (USA). Monument honoring Raoul Wallenberg [1912-1947?], Swedish diplomat who rescued tens of thousands to about one hundred thousand Jews in Nazi-occupied Hungary during the Holocaust. Entry #705 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
October 18, 1999 - Rudy Macina Peace Memorial Plaza, Williamsbridge Road, Laconia Avenue & Pelham Parkway North, The Bronx, New York City, New York (USA). "The unusual Peace Memorial Plaza/Rudy Macina Square gathers 5 memorials resembling tombstones, memorializing war dead in the Gulf War, Vietnam War, Korean War & World Wars I & II." /// "Remarks By Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani At Public Hearing On Local Laws: '...Rudy Macina was born on January 1, 1923 in the Morris Park section of the Bronx. He was educated at local schools and went on to enlist in the Marine Corps. In World War II he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. After the War, Rudy returned to the Bronx and became a community activist. He was instrumental in the revitalization of the Bronx Columbus Day Parade from a small event to an extravaganza. He and his friends adopted two subway stations on the Dyer Avenue Line and worked to remove graffiti and paint in the stations in order to keep them clean and attractive. He was also the driving force behind a movement to dedicate the traffic triangle at the convergence of Williamsbridge Road, Laconia Avenue and Pelham Parkway North as a veterans memorial. For his many patriotic and civic activities Rudy Macina was awarded the "Congressional Medal of Merit." Unfortunately, Rudy Macina died on June 25, 1993 at the age of 70...'"

November 11, 2001 - Wall of Nations Memorial, Ground Zero, New York City, New York (USA). Commemorates 83 countries (in blue on map) whose citizens were lost in the attack on the World Trade Center (WTC). Left image shows President George W. Bush & UN Secretary General Kofi Annan at the wall.

July 16, 2002 - Irish Hunger Memorial, Vesey Street & North End Avenue, Battery Park City, New York City, New York (USA). "Designed collaboratively by artist Brian Tolle, landscape architect Gail Wittwer-Laird, and 1100 Architect. Dedicated to raising awareness of the Great Irish Famine - referred to by the Irish as 'The Great Hunger' or An Gorta Mor in Irish Gaelic - that killed up to a million people in Ireland between the years 1845 & 1852. It is a uniquely landscaped plot, which utilizes stones, soil & native vegetation brought in from the western coast of Ireland & contains stones from all of the different counties of Ireland. Also incorporates an authentic rebuilt Irish cottage of the 19th century."

September 11, 2002 - "Bell of Hope," Trinity Church, 79 Broadway (at Wall Street), New York City, New York (USA). Inscribed, "To the greater glory of God and in recognition of the enduring links between the City of London and the city of New York." Cast July 26, 2002, by Whitechapel Bell Foundry which cast the Liberty Bell in 1752. Weighs 294.84 kilograms.
May 2003 - Invisible Man: A Memorial to Ralph Ellison, Riverside Park (West Harlem Section), New York City, New York (USA). "American born Mexican sculptor & printmaker Elizabeth Catlett [1915-2012] designed this sculpture [honoring] Ralph Ellison [1914-1994], author of Invisible Man, one of the first novels to point out racial issues in America. He was a neighbor of the area living in front of where the sculpture stands. Catlett's works focus on Black expressionistic sculptures & prints most produced during the 60's-70's."

October 14 2003 - Alfred Nobel Monument, Theodore Roosevelt Park, 81st Street & Columbus Avenue, New York City, New York (USA). Honors the 306 American laureates of the Nobel Prize. Additional laureates are added during an annual inscription ceremony. Sculpted by Swedish sculptor Sivert Lindblom, and presented in part by the Swedish Embassy. Adjacent to the American Museum of Natural History ("probably the most-visited museum in the world"). Click here for a New York Times article about Nobel laureates from New York City.
2004 - Luminous Manuscript, Paul S. & Sylvia Steinberg Great Hall, Center for Jewish History (CJH), 15 West 16th Street, New York City, New York (USA). Designed by Diane Samuels of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Floor by Michele Oka Doner. "Serves as the metaphorical preface to the vast archival collections of the [five CJH] institutions & explores the role of language & books in Jewish history & memory."
February 2006 - The Peace Tower, Whitney Museum of American Art, Sculpture Court, Madison Avenue at 75th Street, New York City, New York (USA). Created for the 2006 Whitney Biennial by Mark Di Suvero & Rirkrit Tiravanija. Two hundred other artists each contributed a 2x2 foot panel. Left image shows "The Artists' Tower of Protest" (aka Peace Tower) against the War in Viet Nam as conscructed by Di Suvero in Los Angeles in 1966. Click here for journalistic description.
September 11, 2006 - Grief Tear Memorial, Bayonne, New Jersey (USA). "...opened to the anthems of Russia and the USA. On the bank of the Hudson River [facing the Statue of Liberty & Lower Manhattan], is a split 30-meter bronze plate with a giant tear made of titanium. The names of almost 3 thousand people killed on September, 11, 2001, are engraved on the monument. ...gift of Russian people, so sculptor Zurab Tsereteli who also and his colleagues took all the expenses on its erection up [sic]." Tsereteli also sculpted the statue of "Good Defeats Evil" (qv) at UN headquarters in 1990.

October 2007 - Swing Low: A Memorial to Harriet Tubman, Harriet Tubman Square, 122nd Street, St. Nicholas Avenue & Frederick Douglass Boulevard, New York City, New York (USA). Former slave Harriet Tubman [1820-1913] was an abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War.
September 26, 2008 - Garden of Healing, Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Garden, Staten Island, New York City, New York (USA). "One-acre garden, with a path that encircles the nearby 9/11 World Trade Center Educational Tribute Building, features saplings from a pear tree that was rescued from ground zero by workers from the city Parks Department, a Celtic cross, and a Wall of Remembrance depicting individual victims. It overlooks 20 acres of wetlands."
October 21, 2009 - "Stop the Violence. Another Way is Possible," Houston Street & Avenue B, Lower East Side (LES), New York City, New York (USA). "The legendary LES artist retired to Florida earlier this year. But Chico [Antonio Garcia] is back, thanks to the Lower East Side Girls Club and the anti-violence organization Power of Peace (POP)."
Date? - "Doves," New York City, New York (USA). Mural by Puerto Rican street artist Antonio Garcia (better known as Chico). Depicts the pope and ___?

M
U
S
E
U
M
August 7, 2010 - James E. Davis Multicultural Museum of Peace, Crown Heights, Brooklyn, New York City, New York (USA). "A storefront shrine to dialog & reconciliation. So it's both ironic & appropriate that it stands mere meters away from the spot where the child of two West Indian immigrants was accidentally killed by a car driven by an Orthodox Jew from the Chabad Hasidic sect, whose world headquarters are a mere block away. The incident sparked three days of violence in 1991 that pitted the area's African American & Caribbean communities against the area's sizable Orthodox Jewish population. It resulted in a young Jew being killed in reprisal & millions of dollars worth of property destroyed. Named after James E. Davis [1962-2003], the late African American New York City councilman & co-founder [in 1990] of the 'Love Yourself Stop the Violence' organization, the museum's walls are covered in photos in his honor in hopes of educating people on the importance of standing together against violence." Founded by J.E. Davis' brother Geoffrey A. Davis.

August 9, 2012 - A. J. Muste Peace Mural, Peace Pentagon, 339 Lafayette Street, New York City, New York (USA). "By Sachio Ko-yin*One Painter. One pacifist folk hero.....by artist Christopher Cardinale. A.J. Muste [1885-1967], was an organizer & writer for peace & social justice, who began his career as a minister. He left behind a rich legacy of labor, civil rights & anti-war organizing. His famous saying, “There is no way to peace. Peace is the Way” appears at the top of the painting. Christopher Cardinale is a Brooklyn-based comic book artist & muralist, whose large scale mural projects have appeared in New York, New Mexico, Greece, Italy & Mexico. He also works with World War 3 Illustrated, the long-running political comic magazine... The "peace pentagon" is the home of several activist groups, most prominently the historic War Resisters League [WRL], a secular pacifist organization founded in 1923."
2014 - National September 11 Memorial & Museum, New York City, New York (USA). "The National September 11 Memorial & Museum is a private not-for-profit (501c3) [sic], responsible for oversight of the design, raising the necessary funds, programming and operating the Memorial & Museum being built at the World Trade Center site."

Future - Peace & Love Tower, downtown Manhattan, New York City, New York (USA). UnGun.org has been collecting guns for over 3 years, and the main structure will be supported by 5,000,000 guns that have been donated to the cause. The structure will feature a top heavy design and the walls will act as one large greenhouse. Choski & Associates won the contract to build the structure in 2006.

Right click image to enlarge.

(2) Remainder of New York State


1628 - The Reconcilation of King Henry III & Henry of Navarre, Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (USA). By Peter Paul Rubens [1577-1640].

1910 - New York Peace Monument, Point Park, Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA). Depicts soldiers from North and South shaking hands. Built by State of New York.
October 15, 1911 - Goethe–Schiller Monument, Schiller Park, Syracuse, New York (USA). "Incorporates a copper double-statue of the German poets Johann Wolfgang von Goethe [1749–1832] & Friedrich Schiller [1759–1805]. Erected by the German-American organizations of Syracuse & Onondaga County. Schiller (on the reader's right in the photo) was called the 'poet of freedom' in the US & had an enormous 19th Century following. This was the last of 13 monuments to Schiller that were erected in US cities. Goethe was the 'supreme genius of modern German literature.' He & Schiller are paired in the statue because they had a 'friendship like no other known to literature or art.' Goethe is holding a laurel wreath in his right hand, and Schiller's right hand is reaching towards it. Modeled on the 1857 monument in Weimar (Germany). Ernst Rietschel had been commissioned to create a cast bronze double-statue for Weimar, which was exactly copied for the Syracuse & for three earlier US monuments... Schiller Park had been renamed in 1905, the centennial of Schiller's death. The statue tops a large black marble pedestal; it is at the top of a steep slope, and is approached by a formal stairway."
August 17, 1925 - International Peace Bridge, Niagara River, US/Canadian Border between Buffalo, New York (USA), & Fort Erie, Ontario (Canada). Entry #1208 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

1930's - "Peace" (Father Devine Peace Mission), Crum Elbow Estate, Hudson River, New York (USA). "Landing & exterior view of Father Divine's religious mission next to barn with 'PEACE' painted on the side on the banks of the Hudson River." "Father Divine [c1876-1965], also known as Reverend M.J. Divine, was an African American spiritual leader from about 1907 until his death. He founded the International Peace Mission movement, formulated its doctrine, and oversaw its growth from a small and predominantly black congregation into a multiracial and international church." Photos from Life Magazine, September 1939.

May 29, 1935 - Statute of "La Paix / Peace," "Garden of Normandie," Pinelawn Memorial Park (aka Long Island National Cemetery), Framingdale, Long Island, New York (USA). "Thirteen feet tall gilded statue of a toga-clad woman, one arm raised & offering an olive branch, by Louis Dejean [1872-1954]. [Originally] dominated the center of the [305-foot long] first class dining room of the French liner Normandie [1935-1942]" -- which sank in New York City during World War II. "The sculpture survived & was acquired [when?] by the cemetery after being discovered dismantled in a Brooklyn churchyard." (Bronze medallions from two doors of the Normandie are still in use at Our Lady of Lebanon Marionite Cathedral in Brooklyn, NY.)
July 17, 1958 - Peace Monument, Robert Moses-Robert H. Saunders Power House & Dam, St. Lawrence-Franklin Deleno Roosevelt Power Project, St. Lawrence River between Massena, New York (USA), and Cornwall, Ontario (Canada). The dam's 32 turbine-generators are divided equally by the international border, with the two sections operated independently by the New York Power Authorty (NYPA) and Ontario Power Generation (OPG). Queen Elizabeth II dedicated the monument on the international border inside the power house.

July 25, 1962 - Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, National Park Service (NPS), 12 Sagamore Hill Road, Oyster Bay, New York (USA). Home of Thodore Roosevelt from 1885 until his death in 1919. Known as the "Summer White House" during his presidency. Theodore Roosevelt [1858-1919] was US President 1901-1909 and received the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize.

1966 - Pacim in Terris, 96 Covered Bridge Road, Warwick, New York (USA). Sculptures & sculpture garden created by Dutch-born Dr. Frederick Franck [1909-2006]. Dedicated to Dr. Albert Schweitzer (with whom Dr. Franck practiced dentistry in Gabon 1958-1961), Pope John XXIII (whom he sketched during the Second Vatican Council), and the Buddhist sage Daisetz T. Suzuki (who "taught me to think"). Images show entrance sculpture, St. Francis sculpture, Seven Generations, & Hiroshima--The Unkillable Human. See other sculpture by Dr. Franck in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
May 17, 1969 - Sloop "Clearwater," Hudson River, New York (USA). 106 feet/32 meters overall. Built in Harvey Gamage Shipyard, South Bristol, Maine, for Pete Seeger [1919-2014]. "Starting in the 1970's, used to force a clean-up of PCB contamination of the Hudson River caused by industrial manufacturing by General Electric & other companies on the river's edge. Other specific Hudson watershed issues with which Clearwater is concerned are development pressures in the southern half of the Hudson Valley, pesticide runoff, the Manhattan west side waterfront, Indian Point nuclear reactors & New York/New Jersey Harbor dredge spoil disposal. Clearwater has gained worldwide recognition for its leadership in helping to pass landmark environmental laws, both state & federal, including the Clean Water Act." /// Image shows the Clearwater sailing south, past Manhattan's Grant's Tomb & Riverside Church.

August 15-18, 1969 - Woodstock Music & Art Fair, Woodstock, New York (USA). "A music festival, billed as 'An Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music,' held at Max Yasgur's 600-acre dairy farm near the hamlet of White Lake in the town of Bethel, Sullivan County, New York, 43 miles (69 km) southwest of the town of Woodstock, New York. During the sometimes rainy weekend, 32 acts performed outdoors in front of 400,000 concert-goers. It is widely regarded as one of the greatest & most pivotal moments in popular music history & was listed among Rolling Stone's 50 Moments That Changed the History of Rock & Roll. The event was captured in the successful 1970 documentary movie 'Woodstock,' an accompanying soundtrack album & Joni Mitchell's song 'Woodstock' which commemorated the event & became a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young."

1977 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial, Martin Luther King, Jr., Park, Near Best Street, Buffalo, New York (USA). Plaque reads: "I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed, 'We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal.' M.L.K. Jr. 1929-1968."

1991 - World Peace Sanctuary, World Peace Prayer Society, 26 Benton Road, Wassaic, Dutchess County, New York (USA). "Occupies 154 acres. The office building [left image] was renovated from a cow barn to an office which now serves as the international headquarters of the World Peace Prayer Society, the Peace Pole Project & Peace Pals International [for children]. The annual 'A Call To Peace' gathering is presented in the Sacred Grove [right image]. [The gathering] celebrates the International Day of Peace [with] highlighting ceremonies & rituals to bless the Native American Nations, the 50 US States & its territories & the countries of the world in a colorful procession of flag Ceremonies." Entry #626 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
1993 - Grafton Peace Pagoda, Petersburg, Rensselaer County, New York (USA). "Built through the efforts of a nun, Jun Yasuda, who had been close to Native Americans, and her stupa was dedicated to their survival." One of about 80 peace pagodas of the Nipponzan Myohoji Buddhist Order. The only other one in the USA is in Leverett, Massachusetts (qv). Entry #652 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).
1993 - Statue of Martin Luther King, Jr., Lincoln Park, Albany, New York (USA). Photo taken after ice storm on January 15, 2007. Entry #624 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).

T
R
E
E
1993? - "Tree of Peace," Turning Stone Resort & Casino, Verona, New York (USA). Luminous glass sculpture by Dale Chihuly. The casino belongs to the Oneida Indian Nation. See Chihuly's "Flame of Liberty" at the National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia (2000).

W
A
L
L
About 1995 - "World Wall for Peace" (WWFP), between Plassman & Hennepin Hall, Siena College, Loudenville, New York (USA). "Recreated" on September 21, 2010. Image (showing Martin Luther King, Jr., & the words "I have a dream that one day...") is only a few tiles of a much larger mural. One of about 20 WWFP's inspired by Carolyna Marks of Berkeley, California (USA) & created in California, Georgia, Michigan, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Japan, Palestine, Russia & South Africa.
2001 - Jerry Rescue Monument, Clinton Square, Syracuse, New York (USA). By Sharon BuMann, "professional sculptor from Pennellville." "Commemmorates the rescue on October 1, 1851, of a fugitive slave by the name of Jerry (also known by the name of William Henry) by abolishionists... Jerry was eventually taken by wagon to Oswego, where he safely crossed Lake Ontario & into Canada."

M E M O R I A L
2001 - Holocaust Monument, Jericho Jewish Center, Jericho, Long Island, New York (USA). Sculpted by Michael Alfano. Three figures 120% life size. "The man points to a brighter future. The woman looks back in horror, portraying the lost past. Leading them, the child pulls the woman from the past to the future."


T
R
E
E
September 24, 2003 - "Deir Yassin Remembered," Seneca Lake (western shore), New York, New York (USA). Bronze sculpture of an uprooted olive tree by [political cartoonist] Khalil Bendib. Inscription: "Earth torn roots yearning, Palestine landscape mourning displaced descendants. Randa Hamwi Duwaji. Perpetrated by terrorists of the Irgun and Stern Gang, the massacre of Palestinian men, women, and children at Deir Yassin on April 9, 1948 is arguably the most pivotal event in 20th century Palestinian history. // The massacre symbolizes the Zionist quest to build a Jewish state on land inhabited for centuries by Muslims, Christians, and Jews. It marks the begining of the descruction of over 400 Palestinian villages and the exile of more than 700,000 Palestinians. // Over half the population in the land controlled by Israel is not Jewish. Most of these non-Jews are Palestinians. Yet there are few memorails to mark their history and none to mark the massacre at Deir Yassin, which lies 3 km west of the Old City of Jerusalem and only 1,400 m to the north of Yad Vashem, the most famous of all the Holocaust memorials. The irony is breathtaking. // Khalil Bendib, Sculptor, 2003. www.deiryassin.org"
V
I
L
L
A
G
E
April 9, 1948 - Palestinian Village of Deir Yassin (Israel). Unintentional monument. Scene of the Deir Yassin Massacre. Photo is Deir Yassin as seen from Yad Vashem; the village lies in the green trees to the right of the water tower. See more complete description above.

2004 - John Lennon Center for Music & Technology, Five Towns College, Dix Hills, Long Island, New York (USA). Dedicated by Yoko Ono in 2005. Left image courtesy of executive director Sanford Hinden. Right image shows chairman Martin Cohen.
September 21, 2013 - Peace Pole, foot of Broadway, Newburgh, New York (USA). "The Newburgh Rotary & World Wide Peace Bell Foundation, in cooperation with Newburgh Mayor Judy Kennedy's office, are dedicating a new, more substantial Peace Pole... at 11 a.m. Saturday, International Peace Day. The symbol will be dedicated to two late peace advocates: John McConnell [1915-2012], 96, the founder of Earth Day in 1970, and Toshi Seeger [1922-2013], 91, for 70 years a devoted wife to Pete Seeger [1919-2014] who also was a loving mother and friend to everyone she met. During the ceremony, Newburgh will be designated a Rotary Peace City & an International City of Peace, and Kennedy will be honored as a Mayor of Peace. Following the dedication, a short Peace Promenade will take place, ending at 11:45 a.m. Among the community leaders participating will be the Rev. Bill Scafidi, Doug Martin Sturomski & Rotarians Pete Sukeena & Bill Bassett, past district governor." /// Image shows Doug Martin (far right) and Hudson River (in backround).
Future - Cold War/Peace Museum, Stewart International Airport, Newburgh & New Windsor, New York (USA). Sixty miles outside New York City at intersection of Interstate 84 & New York State Thruway (Interstate 87). Will "preserve the SAGE (Semi Automatic Ground Environment) building as a site in which to engage the general public in an examination of all aspects of the Cold War and to explore the lessons that can be drawn from the period... Beginning in 1958, the SAGE Direction Center played a crucial role in America¹s defense against a possible Soviet air attack..."

Please email your comments & questions to geovisual at comcast.net. Thank you.

Return to Peace Monuments main page.