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Peace Monuments
Related to Boats or Ships

NB: This web page does not yet contain "boat people" monuments in Australia, Indonesia, and perhaps other countries.

Right click image to enlarge.
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1598 - Figurehead of "De Liefde / Love," Imperial Museum, Tokyo (Japan). Depicts Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam [1466-1536]. Originally named "Erasmus," this was first Dutch ship ever to reach Japan but was lost in a storm in 1600. The figurehead was saved in a temple and identified in 1926.

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After 1748 - Stained glass window depicting the 'Greyhound,' church in Olney, Buckinghamshire (England). "John Newton [1725-1807], a one time slaver, underwent religious conversion, and conversion to the anti-slavery cause. His near shipwreck on the 'Greyhound' which found refuge in Londonderry in 1748 played a part in this process. He went on to write the hymn ‘Amazing Grace.’"
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1826 - "The Boatload of Knowledge." In 1817, William Maclure [1763-1840] became president of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (ANSP), a post he held for the next 22 years. The next few years, Maclure traveled and resided in France, Italy, Paris, Switzerland, and Spain. In 1824, he visited Robert Owen's cotton mill at New Lanark, Scotland. In July, 1825, he arrived in Philadelphia with Madame Fretageot's nephews. The following November, he met Robert Owen in Philadelphia and decided to join Owen's venture to Harmonie, recently purchased by Owen from Harmonist leader George Rapp and renamed New Harmony. In January 1826, the keelboat Philanthropist (afterwards known as "The Boatload of Knowledge") journeyed down the Ohio River to Mount Vernon, Indiana. From there the well established scientists and educators made their way to New Harmony. Among them were Lesueur, Thomas Say, Maclure, and Pestalozzian educators Marie Duclos Fretageot and William S. Phiquepal d'Arusmont. Soon to join them in New Harmony were Neef and Troost. (The journey and settling are described by Donald E. Pitzer in "William Maclure's Boatload of Knowledge: Science and Education into the Midwest," Indiana Magazine of History 94 (1998) 110-135.)
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1840 - "The Slave Trade" by French painter Auguste-Francois Biard [1800-1882]. As of June 2007, it hangs at the entrance to the "From Slavery to Freedom" exhibit at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA). Painting shows a slave port and slave ship, but where?
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1864 & 1872 - Salle de l'Alabama / Hall of the Alabama, Hotel de Ville / City Hall, Geneva (Switzerland). On August 22, 1864, the [First] Geneva Convention was signed here, founding the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and beginning Geneva's role as an internaitonal city." On September 14, 1872, an international tribunal meeting here settled the so-called "Alabama Claims" of the USA against the UK about actions of the CSS Alabama & other raiders during the US Civil War, thus establishing the principle of international arbritration.

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1898 - Gunboat Melik, Nile riverbank, Khartoum (Sudan). "An unlikely symbol of Anglo-Sudanese co-operation, the Melik was a Victorian weapon of high technology and fearsome power (lower image), intended to terrorise the Sudanese rebels and to kill as many as possible. It was built in Chiswick (England) in 1896, then shipped in pieces to Egypt, taken by rail across the Nubian Desert, and reassembled at Abadieh on the Nile. From there it led a flotilla of heavily armed gunboats, a vital element in Kitchener's reconquest of Khartoum in 1898... Today the gunboat sits in a bed of dried mud and sand in a grove of mahogany trees (upper image), its decks tipped at an angle, the roof collapsing."

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July 14, 1901 - Matthew C. Perry Memorial, Kurihama, Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture (Japan). "Large granite monument at exact spot near Tokyo where the Americans first came ashore in 1853. Unveiled by Commodore Perry's grandson, Rear Admiral Frederick Rodgers (Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Naval Force on Asiatic Station), & the newly installed Prime Minister, Katsura Taro [1848-1913]. Three American warships (USS New York, USS New Orleans & USS Yorktown) fired salutes from a mile off-shore during the ceremony. Accompanied by three Japanese warships (Shikishima, Hatsuse & Amagi). Monument sponsored by the Bei-yu Kyo-kai and erected with funds largely contributed by Japanese." Both photos taken on dedication day.

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1915-1916 - Henry Ford's Peace Ship. "On the outbreak of the First World War in Europe [in 1914], Henry Ford, the wealthy American businessman, soon made it clear he opposed the war and supported the decision of the Woman's Peace Party (WPP) to organize a peace conference in Holland. After the conference Ford was contacted by America's three [sic] leading anti-war campaigners, Jane Addams [1860-1935], Rosika Schwimmer [1877-1948], Oswald Garrison Villard [1872-1949], and Paul Kellogg [1879-1958]. They suggested that Ford should sponsor an international conference in Stockholm to discuss ways that the conflict could be brought to an end. Ford came up with the idea of sending a boat of pacifists to Europe to see if they could negotiate an agreement that would end the war. He chartered the ship Oskar II, and it sailed from Hoboken, New Jersey on 4th December, 1915. The Ford Peace Ship reached Stockholm in January, 1916, and a conference was organized with representatives from Denmark, Holland, Norway, Sweden and the USA. However, unable to persuade representatives from the warring nations to take part, the conference was unable to negotiate an Armistice." (Unitarian Jenkin Lloyd Jones [1843-1918] sailed on the ship.) Upper images show Henry Ford [1863-1947] at the rail of the ship and Lola Maverick Lloyd [1875-1944] on board. Bottom image is "Henry Ford's Peace Ship," a painting by Mary McCleary, Regent's Professor of Art Emeritus, Stephen F. Austin State University. Click here for paper about the Peace Ship.
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1917 - "Peace," Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Steam powered prop towboat built by and for Dravo Contracting Co. The site of the picture is Pittsburgh, but the date and photographer are unknown. Courtesy Boat Photo Museum. Named with reference to World War I?
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1923 - "Erasmus," in the "Want," near the Oranjelaan, Dordrecht, South Holland (Netherlands) "Built in 1923 as the "W.F.van der Wyck" for service between Enkhuizen and Stavoren. In 1941 she was requisitioned by the Germans as "Wilkommen," and in 1944 renamed "Regulus." She was acquired by Spido in 1955 and named "Erasmus." She was out of service in 1973, sold in 1974, and in 1976 became the 'Hollands Glorie" in Dordrecht. She remains as a stationary vessel in Dordrecht, with her engines removed."


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Circa 1925 - "Pax Vobiscum," The River Spree, Berlin (Germany). Pleasure boat owned by anarchist & pacifist Ernst Friedrich [1894-1967], whose 1924 picture book "Krieg dem Kriege! / War against War!" documented the horrors of WW-I (lower left image). In 1925, Friedrich opened the Anti-Kriegs-Museum (AKM) / Anti-War Museum on Parochialstrasse, Berlin. In March 1933, Nazi storm troopers (SA) destroyed the AKM and seized the "Pax Vobiscum." Friedrich was arrested, then emigrated to Belgium & France. In 1982 (15 years after the death of its founder), AKM was reopened by his grandson Tommy Spree (sic); its current address is Brusseler Strasse 21, Berlin. Upper image of "Pax Vobiscum" courtesy of Peter Nias who photographed it from Friedrich's 1935 book, "Von Friedens - Museum zum Hitler - Kaserne / From Peace Museum to Hitler Barracks" (lower right image)
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May 29, 1935 - Statute of "La Paix / Peace," "Garden of Normandie," Pinelawn Memorial Park (aka Long Island National Cemetery), Framingdale, Long Island, New York (USA). "Thirteen feet tall gilded statue of a toga-clad woman, one arm raised & offering an olive branch, by Louis Dejean [1872-1954]. [Originally] dominated the center of the [305-foot long] first class dining room of the French liner Normandie [1935-1942]" -- which sank in New York City during World War II. "The sculpture survived & was acquired [when?] by the cemetery after being discovered dismantled in a Brooklyn churchyard." (Medallions from two doors of the Normandie are still in use aby Our Lady of Lebanon Marionite Cathedral in Boooklyn, NY.)
August 1939 - "Armillary Sphere," Ariana Park, Palais des Nations / Palace of Nations, Geneva (Switzerland). 410 cm in diameter. Weighs some 5,800 kg. Also called Celestial Sphere. By Paul Manship [1885-1966]. Presented by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation in memory of the founder of the League of Nations.
June 1, 1950 - "Aero Memorial World War I 1917-18," Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). By Paul Manship [1885-1966]. "Proposed during WW-I by the Aero Club of Pennsylvania. Commissioned by Fairmount Park Art Association."


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Upper image - 1940 - Padrão dos Descobrimentos / Monument to the Discoveries, Tagus Estuary, Lisbon (Portugal). "Celebrates Portuguese who took part in the Age of Discovery, or the Age of Exploration, of the 15th and 16th centuries. Located where ships departed to their often unknown destinations. A 52 metre-high slab of concrete carved into the shape of the prow of a ship. Side facing away from the river has a carved sword stretching the full height of the monument. Conceived by Portuguese artists, architect Cottinelli Telmo and sculptor Leopoldo de Almeida [1898-1975], as a temporary beacon of the Exposição do Mundo Português / Portuguese World Fair in 1940."
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Lower image - 1992 - Portuguese Navigators Monument, Brenton Point, Newport, Rhode Island (USA). "Oceanfront monument celebrating world navigators." "Representative of an armillary sphere, an ancient navigational instrument used by the explorers and still displayed today on the flag of Portugal." Also "a sphere representing the three fourths of the world that the Portuguese navigators discovered."


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September 2, 1945 (V-J Day) - USS Missouri, Pearl Harbor, Hololulu, Hawaii (USA). Became an unintentional monument with the signing on its deck in Tokyo Bay of the Japanese Instrument of Surender, thus ending World War II (1939-1945). Ordered in 1940 and commissioned in June 1944, the Missouri (aka "Mighty Mo") was the last battleship built by the USA. It was opened as museum on January 29, 1999. Lower image shows the Japanese delegation on board the Missouri just prior to the signing.
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1947 - Exodus 1947 - Carried Holocaust surviross & other Jewish emigrants from France to Palestine, but the British Royal Navy seized the ship and deported all its passengers to the British Zone of Germany. Sign in image reads "HAGANAH Ship / EXODUS 1947." Burned to the waterline in 1952.

July 3, 1952 - "Expressions of Freedom," First Class Dining Room, SS United States. Four stylized figures (12x16 feet) representing the 'Four Freedoms' by sculptress Gwen Lux [1908-1987]" (right image). /// Out of service since 1969, the SS United States is now tied to a pier in Philadelphia, Pennsyvania, awaiting possible restoration as a hotel and/or museum. Many of the ship's fittings were auctioned on October 14, 1984. According to the New York Times, "William D. Wilkinson, director of the Mariners' Museum of Newport News, Virginia, was delighted with his purchases of ''Expressions of Freedom'' by Gwen Lux, the aluminum sculpture from the main dining room, & the buffet that stood beneath it, for a total of $1,525."

NB: Click here for Wikipedia's summary of the "Phoenix," the "Golden Rule," & the Committee for Non-Violent Action (CNVA).




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1954 - "Phoenix of Hiroshima," North Fork of Mokelumne River, off Tyler Island, Lodi, California (USA?). "John Gardner (phoenixofhiroshima @comcast.net, 209-570-4070) has already rescued the Phoenix (bottom image) after seeing it listed for free on craigslist [in late 2006 or early 2007], its San Francisco owner simply wanting to get rid of it to avoid paying any more fees to the Oyster Point Marina. Gardner paid a San Francisco boater to tow it to its current location." Constructed in Hiroshima (Japan) by American Quaker Earle Reynolds [1910-1998] (top image). "1954 brought the realization of a dream for Reynolds when he, his first wife Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990], and their three children began an around the world voyage on the Phoenix. They stopped at over one hundred ports, and Earle gave lectures on conditions in Hiroshima. Young Jessica [middle image] documented this trip in her book, which was later published [1958]. When they arrived in Hawaii in 1958, they met the crew of the Golden Rule (qv), Quakers who were on trial for their attempt to sail into the nuclear test zone near Bikini Island to protest nuclear weapons and atmospheric testing. They had been arrested and prevented from completing their mission. After talking with the crew of the Golden Rule, Dr. Reynolds and his family decided to complete the mission in their place. He also believed that the government did not have a right to restrict access to the open ocean. After sailing into the restricted zone, he was arrested and sentenced to two years in prison. This verdict was appealed and eventually overturned." Earle Reynolds founded the Peace Resource Center at the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) in 1975. Barbara Reynolds founded the World Friendship Center in Hiroshima (Japan) in 1965 and the Peace Resource Center at Wilmington College, Ohio, in 1975.
NB: Click here for comments & images received from Jessica Reynolds Shaver Renshaw after the foregoing was uploaded.




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1958? - "Golden Rule," Eureka, California (USA). Now out of water and for sale by Leon Zerlang (humtug@gmail.com). Asking price is $9,500. Email Jan. 19, 2010 from Wendy E. Chmielewski, PhD, George Cooley Curator, Swarthmore College Peace Collection, Swarthmore. Pennsylvania (USA): "The sailing ship that in 1958 [Quakers] Albert Bigelow [1906-1993], James Peck [1914-1993], George Willoughby [1914-2010] (who just passed away two weeks ago), attempted to sail into the atomic testing grounds near the Marshall Islands. The ship has been repossessed by Leon Zerlang, the ship yard owner (from the bankrupt actual owner). Leon is aware of the ship's history and would like to help save The Golden Rule, but needs ideas and help on what to do to save this ship. Several years ago I received an almost identical email from another ship owner trying to save The Phoenix (qv), a sailing ship with a similar history. I don't know the fate of The Phoenix. It would be a shame to lose still another piece of peace movement history. Ideally something like The Golden Rule, a beautiful sailing ship, should be preserved by the Smithsonian, but I don't know that they have any interest in it." Right image shows Earle Reynolds [1910-1998], his second wife Akie Nagami, Phil Drath, Betty Boardman, Bob Eaton, Horace Champhy, and Ivan Massar embarking from Misaki, Kanagawa (Japan) on February 16, 1967, en route to North Vietnam with medical supplies. "In 1959, Bigelow published a book, "Voyage of the Golden Rule: An Experiment with Truth," which documented his journey. The story would go on to inspire fellow Quaker Marie Bohlen to suggest the use of a similar tactic to members of the Vancouver-based Don't Make a Wave Committee (later to become Greenpeace) in 1970."

NB: The following account is from the autobiography of Robert Swann [1918-2003]:


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1962 - "Everyman I," Sausalito, California (USA). "In 1962 the US announced another round of nuclear tests in the Pacific. We decided to build a 30-foot trimaran sailboat designed by Arthur Piver [1910-1968] and sail it into the testing zone. The US Attorney in San Francisco decided to try to stop us by issuing a 'cease and desist' order. The "Everyman" sailed serenely out under the Bay Bridge [sic] and into ocean waters with a crew of three. Following the boat was a Coast Guard cutter with a US Marshall. Hovering above it all were several helicopters, also with reporters and photographers. All of this was being carried on local radio and TV news so that practically everyone in the San Francisco area was aware of the story. Eventually, with the help of the Coast Guard, he managed to arrest and handcuff the crew and return them to San Francisco. I was also arrested and spent the night in the San Francisco jail [sic] along with the sailors. Meanwhile, the word had gone out. Hundreds of supporters arrived at the Federal courthouse where we were being held. They filled the entire building before closing time, refusing to leave when ordered to do so. We turned our night in jail into a party. Joan Baez lead the singing and we danced all night long. The next day the Feds dropped the case against me but charged the three sailors, who spent a couple of months in jail." (Image shows Arthur Piver's 30-foot "Nimble" built in 1969 in the UK. Piver left Sausalito alone in his 36-foot trimaran on March 17, 1968, en route to San Diego and was never seen again.)

NB: The following two accounts are from the "The Long Voyage: The Golden Rule and Resistance to Nuclear Testing in Asia and the Pacific" by Lawrence S. Wittner, Professor of History, State University of New York, Albany, February 2010:
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1962 - "Everyman II." "Departed from Honolulu, succeeded in sailing through the U.S. Pacific test zone for days before U.S. authorities, hamstrung for a time in securing a court injunction, hauled its crew members off to prison."
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September 1962 - "Everyman III." "Taking on Soviet testing as well, the Committee for Nonviolent Action (CNVA), successor to Non-Violent Action Against Nuclear Weapons, launched Everyman III from London (England) in September 1962, and the following month the 48-foot ketch, captained by Earle Reynolds [1910-1998], arrived in Leningrad (USSR). Refusing to allow antinuclear leafleting, Soviet officials gave the crew the choice of sailing away or being towed out to sea. From the standpoint of the crew, neither was satisfactory. Therefore, to the dismay of the Soviet authorities, some crew members began to sink the vessel in the harbor while others grabbed leaflets and leaped into the near-freezing water in an attempt to swim ashore. Eventually, the vessel was towed away, with Reynolds and the other pacifists kept on board in captivity."

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1962 - USS Arizona Memorial Musuem, National Park Service (NPS), 1 Arizona Memorial Place, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu, Oahu Island, Hawaii (USA). "The underwater USS Arizona serves as the final resting place for many of the battleship's 1,177 crew members who lost their lives on December 7, 1941." One of 27 US museums in "Museums for Peace Worldwide" edited by Kazuyo Yamane (2008).

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August 6, 1965 - World Friendship Center (WFC), 8-10 Higashi Kan-on, Nishi-ku, Hiroshima (Japan). Founded on 20th anniversary of the bomb by American Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990] who also founded the Peace Resources Center (PRC) at Wilmington College of Ohio (USA) in 1975. "Not only a 'home away from home' for travelers to Hiroshima, it is a place where local Hiroshima residents volunteer their hospitality of peace in a variety of activities." Supported by Brethren Volunteer Service (BVS) & by the American Committee of the WFC, currently chaired by Mary Ann Albert of Warsaw, Indiana (USA).
May 17, 1969 - Sloop "Clearwater," Hudson River, New York (USA). 106 feet/32 meters overall. Built in Harvey Gamage Shipyard, South Bristol, Maine, for Pete Seeger [1919-2014]. "Starting in the 1970's, used to force a clean-up of PCB contamination of the Hudson River caused by industrial manufacturing by General Electric & other companies on the river's edge. Other specific Hudson watershed issues with which Clearwater is concerned are development pressures in the southern half of the Hudson Valley, pesticide runoff, the Manhattan west side waterfront, Indian Point nuclear reactors & New York/New Jersey Harbor dredge spoil disposal. Clearwater has gained worldwide recognition for its leadership in helping to pass landmark environmental laws, both state & federal, including the Clean Water Act." /// Image shows the Clearwater sailing south, past Manhattan's Grant's Tomb & Riverside Church.
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1975 - "M.V. Erasmus," Thames River, London (England). "Welcome aboard the newest vessel in our fleet. Built in Germany to a high specification, this modern vessel plied her trade in Holland for four years before entering service on the Thames [in 2002]. A light, airy and spacious boat on three levels, she offers superb views of the attractions and skyline of London. With a total capacity of 340, she is one of the largest boats on the Thames."

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August 6, 1975 - Peace Resource Center (PRC), Wilmington College of Ohio, Wilmington, Ohio (USA). "Has "the world's largest collection (outside of Japan) of reference materials related to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima & Nagasaki." Founded by Barbara Leonard Reynolds who also founded the World Friendship Center (WFC) in Hiroshima (Japan) in 1965. Entry #820 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001). One of 27 US museums in "Museums for Peace Worldwide" edited by Kazuyo Yamane (2008).

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1976 - Display House of the Daigo Fukuryu-Maru / Fifth Lucky Dragon, 3-2 Yumenoshima, Koto-ku, Tokyo (Japan). Displays the tuna fishing boat contaminated by the US hydrogen bomb test at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954. Visited by EWL 10/08.
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1978 - Rainbow Warrior, Greenpeace, Amsterdam (Netherlands). A series of three ships owned by the environmentalist organization Greenpeace. The first "sailed to Rongelap Atoll to help relocate some of the people away from the nuclear waste and was sunk by operatives of the French intelligence service (DGSE)." The second is a motor assisted schooner acquired by Greenpeace in 1989 and is currently in service with the organisation. The third will be a purpose-designed Greenpeace vessel that is to be completed in 2010.

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1981 - Kunta Kinte - Alex Haley Memorial, City Dock, Annapolis, Maryland (USA). Child friendly bronze statues of Pulitzer Prize winner Alex Haley and three children. "Only memorial in the USA that commemorates the actual name and place of arrival of an enslaved African. Consists of three distinct areas: The Alex Haley sculpture group, Compass Rose, and Story Wall." Note boats in harbor.
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1983 - "Peace Boat" (SS Topaz), Yokohama (Japan). Has conducted 53 "Voyages for Peace" since 1983 to all parts of the world from its home port of Yokohama.

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1984 - Barco de la Paz / Peace Ship. Voyage to Nicaragua during the height of the war against the Sandinistas that was waged by Washington and the Contras. Four Nobel Prize winners travel with a load of material aid to the besieged Central American country: Betty Williams [b.1943], Adolfo Perez Esquivel [b.1931], George Wald [1906-1997], and Linus Pauling [1901-1994].

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After 1985 - "Schengen Agreement" monument, near Moselle bridge, Schengen (Luxembourg). "Three steel pillars, each with a star represent the first participant countries of the Schengen Agreement (France, Germany and Benelux), who met here in the triangle where the borders of Germany, France, and Luxembourg meet... This is a treaty signed in 1985, on the river-boat "Princesse Marie-Astrid," providing for the removal of systematic border controls between the participating countries."

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1994 - Schulschiff / Training Ship, Bundesgymnasium und Bundesrealgymnasium 'Bertha von Suttner' (GRG 21), anchored in the Danube River, Vienna (Austria). "Two boats with 36 classrooms and administrative offices. The gym is located on a third float." Named for Baroness Bertha von Suttner [1843-1914] who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1905. The Donauturm / Danube Tower & Vienna International City (VIC) are visible in the backround of the image.

1996 - Vakantieschip J. Henry Dunant / Holiday ship J. Henry Dunant, The Hague? (Netherlands). Most recent of a series of ships operated by Nederlandse Rode Kruis / Dutch Red Cross for passengers requiring special care. Google translation: "Welcome aboard ! In the J. Henry Dunant, you can enjoy a long week of a carefree holiday . You see the landscape pass before you and enjoy meanwhile the comfort and luxury of a cruise ship really . Visit to the charming harbor towns. Twice a week puts the J. Henry Dunant early afternoon in one of the port towns we visit. You can go shopping, on a terrace or visit a museum. Delicious. A volunteer will accompany you , but you can also alone or with a companion on the go. Luxury facilities on board. Do not want to go out ? For example, you can sunbathe on the deck or your hairstyle to take in hand at the hair salon. You can also take a look at the gift shop. There you will find solid fun gifts for those at home." Fine dining. Every evening our chefs cater for a full dinner and once a week we spoil you with a festive dinner. On Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, dinner followed by an evening entertainment program. The volunteers and our crew ensure that your every need." /// J. Henry Dunant [1828-1910] was founder of the Red Cross & receipient of the first Nobel Peace Prize (1901).
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1999-2004 - Artship, Grove Street Pier, Jack London Square, Oakland, California (USA). The former "Golden Bear" -- built by US Government in 1939, a passenger/cargo ship for Delta Lines, then a California Maritime Academy training ship. In 1995, Artship was "chosen as the US headquarters of the International Peace University [sic]... [After 1999, its] highly developed and diverse grass roots programming and participation were becoming a recognizable nexus for developing a signature venue, a dynamic capable of becoming a destination and an epicenter of Oakland specific urban revitalization...leading to cultural tourism. [But] the City of Oakland sued and evicted Artship on January 1, 2004. Its agency the Port of Oakland strong-armed the ARTSHIP Foundation to renounce its title to the ship and sold it for scrap."
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1999 - Vredesboot / Peace Boat, Amsterdam (Netherlands). As described in "Peace Museums Worldwide" (United Nations 1998), originally intended to be an anti-war museum "on a boat which will be able to travel throughout the country, and even abroad." Still uses its boat logo (seen in image) but became a "virtual museum" -- the Dutch language "Museum of Peace and Nonviolence on the Internet."

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2000 - "Freedom Schooner Amistad," New Haven, Connecticut (USA). La Amistad (Spanish for "Friendship") was a ship taken over in July 1839 by African captives being transported from Havana to Puerto Principe, Cuba. The Africans & the ship were later captured off Long Island by the US Revenue Cutter Service, La Amistad became a symbol in the movement to abolish slavery, and a US Supreme Court case over the status of the Africans took place in 1841, as importation of slaves into the US had been prohibited since 1808." "In 1998-2000, Mystic Seaport built a recreation christened "Freedom Schooner Amistad." The ship's mission is to educate the public on the history of slavery, discrimination, and civil rights. Her homeport is New Haven, where the Amistad trial took place. She also travels to other port cities for educational opportunities."

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May 2001? - "In Pursuit of Peace: An Exhibit From the Earle and Akie Reynolds Archive," University Library, University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC), Santa Cruz, California (USA). "This is an on-line exhibit covering the life of peace activists, Earle and Akie Reynolds. 'It is not only the story of Earle and Akie Reynolds, but also of Barbara Leonard Reynolds, Ted Reynolds, and Jessica Reynolds [Shaver Renshaw] (also see this website), and the decisions and events that changed their lives. The archive itself contains a range of materials including correspondence, manuscripts, video and audio tapes, scrapbooks, nautical maps, photo albums and artifacts, all of which attest to the passion and dedication of the Reynolds' pursuit of peace. This virtual exhibit hopes to capture some of the excitement of discovery that the processing team felt in unraveling the stories contained within the archive.'"

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2004 - Tsushima-maru Memorial Museum, Naha, Okinawa (Japan). The Tsushima-maru was an unmarked Japanese passenger/cargo ship sunk August 22, 1944, by the submarine USS Bowfin as it carried hundreds of schoolchildren from Okinawa to Kagoshima. 767 children and 717 other civilians were killed, and only 59 children survived. The museum is shaped like the ship. Its purpose is "not to forget the tragedy and create a base for the education of peace where the children of the next generation can learn the preciousness of peace and life ant realize the importance of their own lives."


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2005 - "On the 23rd of May 2005, the anti-nuclear peace vessel Zeus, home to my daughter and myself was totally destroyed deliberately by the New Zealand state. Six tonnes of our personal belongings were also destroyed. The Auckland Regional Council proceeded to send me a bill for $70,000 for transferring the vessel Zeus into a landfill. The second vessel, Phoenix, which had been very active in the anti-nuclear movement in New Zealand, was also ordered to be destroyed. The New Zealand state, Auckland Regional Council, Environment Waikato and the Environment Court have all pursued a political policy of total destruction of these two anti-nuclear peace ships. It is only a matter of time before nuclear ships are allowed back into New Zealand waters. I'm now dedicated to build a new anti-nuclear peace ship of the same size as my previous vessel Zeus to defend New Zealand's nuclear-free zone when the policy changes to allow nuclear ship visits again. I remain defiant and in defence of a nuclear-free zone I am building a new ship, Peace Ship Zeus My research indicates that nine million dollars of New Zealand Superannuation has been invested in Northrop Gruman who build the Nimitz-class and future Ford-class nuclear-powered aircraft carriers. -- Gary "Zeus" Moulton, March 2008."
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August 22, 2007 - International Slavery Museum, Liverpool (England). Has three main galleries: Life in West Africa, Enslavement and the Middle Passage, and Legacies of Slavery. One of ten "musuems for peace" in the UK (vs. more than 200 in the USA).
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Date? - Bristol Slavery Trail, Bristol (England). "This is a town trail with a difference. It aims to show you what the handsome squares and quaint buildings of a pleasant English city have to do with one of the ugliest and most destructive events in human history... the Transatlantic slave trade." Route available from Museum Shop, City Museum & Art Gallery, Queen's Road, Bristol.

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August 6, 2008 - "Stories of Hope," permanent exhibit at Peace Resource Center (PRC), Wilmington College of Ohio, Wilmington, Ohio (USA). Highlights four stories: PRC founder Barbara Leonard Reynolds [1915-1990], Sadako Sasaki [1943-1955], the Hiroshima Maidens, and Dr. Takashi Nagai [1908-1951], the first published writer of the A-Bomb experience. The PRC has "the world's largest collection (outside of Japan) of reference materials related to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki." Entry #820 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001). One of 27 US museums in "Museums for Peace Worldwide" edited by Kazuyo Yamane (2008).
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April 25, 2009 - Vietnamese Boat People Monument, Westminster, Orange County, California (USA). Memorializes the tens of thousands who died in the high seas as they tried to escape communist Vietnam after the Fall of Saigon in April 1975. Built by Cam Ai Tran and Hap Tu Thai who escaped from Vietnam in 1979 by a boat which capcized, forcing them to swim ashore near Hai Nam Island in the South China Sea.
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January 6, 2010 - "Activists from the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society on their high-tech powerboat Ady Gil sails near a Japanese whaling fleet in the Southern Ocean." "CANBERRA - Anti-whaling activists accused Japanese whalers of ramming and sinking a high-tech protest boat in the frigid Southern Ocean on Wednesday, but Japan said that its ship could not avoid the collision. The Australian government called for restraint by all parties after the hardline Sea Shepherd Conservation Society said its futuristic powerboat Ady Gil was cut in half by the Japanese security ship Shonan Maru No. 2." Photo: The Institute of Cetacean Research/Handout.
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May 31, 2010 - MV Mavi Marmara. Owned by the Islamic charity Insani Yardim Vakfi / Foundation for Human Rights & Freedom & Humanitarian Relief (IHH). Israeli commandos attacked the Turkish ship in international waters with about 600 peace activsts on board as it and five other vessels were en route to Gaza with 10,000 tons of construction materials and humanitrian supplies. Israel has blockaded Gaza since 2007.
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Future - Floating Peace Museum, Bovalino, near Locri, Calabria (Italy). Will fight against organized crime (the Mafia) in southern Italy. Proposed by Lucetta Sanguinetti (seen in image), Town Councillor of Collegno Municipality (Italy) and member of the executive board, Interntional Network of Museums for Peace (INMP).

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