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153 Peace Monuments in England,
Scotland & Wales (Great Britain)
Not including London & Northern Ireland

= United Kingdom = England = Scotland = Wales = Northern Ireland = Guernsey = Gibraltar

Click here for peace monuments in & near London (not shown below).
Click here for peace monuments in Ireland & Northern Ireland.
Click here for "Memorials for Peace," website of the Peace Pledge Union (PPU).

Right click image to enlarge.
Ancient - Lion & Lamb Peak, Helm Crag, Grasmere, Cumbria, (England). "Two rock tors stand at either end of its summit ridge lending scope for tourist guides of former years to offer a plethora of descriptive names to entertain their passengers: Lion and Lamb, the Howitzer, Old Lady Playing an Organ. These tops are hard for the average hill-goer to climb..." Click here for lion & lamb monuments worldwide.

May 28, 1502 - Treaty of Perpetual Peace between England and Scotland, National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh (Scotland). The treaty Scotland sent to England was decorated with thistles and roses to represent the two countries. This was the first occasion the two countries had been linked symbolically by representations of these plants, and the court poet William Dunbar [c1460-c1520] used this theme for his poem on the marriage, The Thrissill and the Rois. The treaty promised everlasting peace between the two countries, the first effective lull over 200 years of intermittent warfare

1652 - Pendle Hill, Borough of Pendle, Lancashire (England). Visited in 1652 by George Fox [1624-1691] leading to his foundation of the Quaker movement.
1930 - Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pennsylvania (USA). Quaker educational center near Philadelphia named for Pendle Hill (England).


1672 - Statues of Peace & Plenty, Castle Bromwich Hall, Castle Bromwich, Solihull, West Midlands (England). Bridgeman Family Coat of Arms & Lion. /// "Castle Bromwich Hall is a Jacobean mansion that was built between 1557 & 1585 by Sir Edward Devereaux, the first MP for Tamworth in Staffordshire. It was single storey with a plain entrance. It was bought by Orlando Bridgeman (keeper of The Great Seal) in 1657, for his son Sir John Bridgeman I. Sir John extended and improved the property in 1672, adding the second floor & a large front porch."


About 1807 - John Newton's grave & Stained glass window depicting the 'Greyhound,' Parish Church of St. Peter & St. Paul, Olney, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire (England). One of a series of stained glass windows depicting the ship "Greyhound." John Newton [1725-1807], a one time slaver, underwent religious conversion & conversion to the anti-slavery cause. His near shipwreck on the 'Greyhound' which found refuge in Londonderry (Northern Ireland) in 1748 played a part in this process. He went on to write ‘Amazing Grace.’" /// ". The Vicarage was occupied by John Newton as Curate from 1764 until 1780, when he moved to London, becoming Rector of St. Mary Woolnoth. A dormer window belongs to the study where he wrote Amazing Grace. The church contains Newton's pulpit & fine stained glass windows commemorating William Cowper [1731-1800] & Newton. In the churchyard are the graves of Newton & his wife Mary, with an interesting inscription describing himself as 'once an infidel and libertine, a servant of slaves in Africa...'" When was the window created?

"The Treaty of Fontainebleau was established in Fontainebleau, France, on 11 April 1814, between Napoleon I [1769-1821] & representatives from the Austrian Empire, Russia & Prussia. The treaty was signed at Paris on 11 April, by the plenipotentiaries of both sides & ratified by Napoleon on 13 April. With this treaty, the allies ended Napoleon's rule as emperor of France and sent him into exile on Elba." /// "Napoleon's initial defeat [was] the short-lived peace proclaimed on 27 June 1814 when Napoleon was imprisoned on Elba. The peace was celebrated in Paris, but [King George IV] the Prince Regent [1762-1830] invited the allied sovereigns to continue their celebrations in England. The offer was enthusiastically taken up. June 1814 must have been the only time in Oxford's history when it hosted an emperor, a king, four future kings, a chancellor of the Austrian empire, two future and two past British prime ministers, many world-famous generals, and enough peers to burst the House of Lords... And one of the things they wanted to do was to visit the famous university town of Oxford, one of the very few places in the country, incidentally, where the Prince Regent could rely on a warm welcome. At the prospect, 'every heart fluttered with expectation and delight.'" -- From "Big Junket" by Christopher Danziger (2015). Thus Oxford played a unique role in the Peace of 1814, and its two modest 1814 peace monuments -- see below -- have quietly marked this momentous event for over 200 years. This puts the two Oxford monuments among the earliest examples of "peace monuments" anywhere & makes them contemporaries of the Stoodley Pike Monument in West Yorkshire (qv).


1814 - Peace Stone, Carfax, Oxford (England). Inscribed: "'PEACE was proclaim’d In the CITY of OXFORD JUNE 1814.' There is a more modern inscribed stone immediately below the peace stone, which adds no information whatsoever: 'THE STONE ABOVE COMMEMORATES THE PEACE OF 1814.' In 1814 this peace stone was set in the north side of the tower of the original [11th century] medieval Church of St. Martin at Carfax. This church was in the centre of the City of Oxford where four roads meet, and it was also the City Church."


1814 - Peace Stone, Plain Roundabout, Oxford (England). Now the pedestal of a street lamp. Inscribed "PEACE was proclaimed in the City of OXFORD JUNE 27 1814." The roundabout marked the eastern entrance to Oxford from the London direction in 1814 (St. Clement's was not taken into the city until 1835). Information courtesy of Stephanie Jenkins & Tim Myatt.

After 14 June 1814 - Vase of Siberian Jasper, Merton College, Oxford University, Oxford (England). Danziger's article also depicts a "vase of Siberian jasper sent to Merton College by Tsar Alexander I [1777-1825] & his sister Ekaterina Pavlovna [1788-1819] in thanks after lodging there [during the peace celebration] on the night of 14 June 1814." (This is similar to the vase [qv] given by Russia to the Peace Palace in The Hague 100 years later.)


1814-1854, 1856 - Stoodley Pike Monument, West Yorkshire (England). Stoodley Pike is a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill in the south Pennines, noted for the 121 foot Stoodley Pike Monument at its summit, which dominates the moors above Todmorden. Inscription above the entrance is worn & covered with lichen, but it is legible & reads: "Stoodley Pike. A beacon monument erected by public subscription commenced in 1814 to commemorate the surrender of Paris to the allies and finished after the Battle of Waterloo when peace was established in 1815. By a strange coincidence the pike [monument] fell on the day the Russian ambassador left London before the declaration of war with Russia in 1854. Was rebuilt when peace was restored in 1856." Info courtesy of Nick Wilding.

November 1835 - Wilberforce Monument, Queen's Garderns, Hull (England). "The column is 90 feet, and the statue on top is 12 feet tall, carved out of hard-wearing millstone grit. The statue was, in fact, an after-thought by the monument committee. It was sculpted by a Mr. Feort in Dock Street." Photo was taken in 1903. /// "William Wilberforce [1759-1833] was a British politician, philanthropist & a leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade."

1853-1856Crimean War

June 4, 1862 - Joseph Sturge Memorial, Swallow Hotel, Five Ways, Birmingham (England). Joseph Sturge [1793-1859] was a Quaker who campaigned tirelessly for peace, even visiting St. Petersburg in an attempt to avert the Crimean War. Images show memorial before & after restoration, cleaning & rededication on March 24, 2007.
March 2007 - Blue Plaque for Joseph Sturge, 64 Wheeleys Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham (England).

Date? - Statue of Richard Cobden, outside St. Ann's Church, Manchester (England). Richard Cobden [1804-1865] was a major peace figure (according to Peter van den Dungen). See other Cobden statue in Camden High Street, London.
1868 - Statue of Richard Cobden, Camden High Street, London (England). Sculpted by W, and T, Wills. Richard Cobden [1804-1865] was a major peace figure (according to Peter van den Dungen). Upper image is from 1905, lower image is recent. One of 309 London monuments in Kershman (2007), page 350. See other Cobden statue outside St. Ann's Church, Manchester.

1872 - George Fox Memorial, George Fox Lane, Fenny Drayton (England). At birthplace of George Fox [1624-1691]. Click here for Quaker peace monuments worldwide.

1880-1881First Boer War
1881-1899Anglo-Sudan War or Mahdist War


1885 - "Hypatia," Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle-on-Tyne (England). Painting by Charles William Mitchell [1854-1903], an English Pre-Raphaelite painter from Newcastle. It was "likely inspired by 'Hypatia or New Foes with an Old Face,' a serialized novel by Charles Kingsley [1819-1875]." As you can see he created the iconic as well as ironic painting of Hypatia in front of a Christian altar, the irony being that she was pagan." Hypatia [d. March 415] was "a Greek scholar from Alexandria (Egypt) considered to be the first notable female mathematician. She was assassinated by a Christian mob who accused her of causing religious turmoil."


1888 - Statue of John Bright, Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery, Chamberlain Square, Birmingham (England). Marble statue by Albert Bruce Joy [1842-1924]. Refurbished and unveiled in October 2009 after sitting for some time in a warehouse. The bicentenary of Bright's birth will occur in 2011. Image shows John Bright Street where the statue was originally erected. Apparently no image of the statue is on-line.

1891 - Statue of John Bright, Broadfield Park, Rochdale (England). Sculpted by William Hamo Thornycroft [1850-1925]. John Bright [1811-1889] was a "member of parliament for Rochdale, who fought to bring about the abolition of slavery and the slave trade."
1891 - Statue of John Bright, Albert Square, Manchester (England). Sculpted by Albert Bruce Joy [1842-1924].

August 18, 1893 - Henry Richard Statue, Tregaron, Cardiganshire (Wales). By Albert Toft." Henry Richard [1812-1888] was born in Tregaron. He was a Nonconformist minister in London before being elected the Liberal Member of Parliament for Merthyr Tydfil in 1868. He was known as 'The Apostle of Peace' in recognition of his work as secretary of the Peace Society [1848-1884]." One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009. (N.B.: "Apostle of Peace" also used on plaque for W.T. Stead [1849-1912] in Embleton (England) 327 road miles from Tregaron.)


1894 - Statue of Edmund Burke, Colston Avenue, City Centre, Bristol (England). Inscribed: "Burke 1774-1780. 'I wish to be a Member of Parliament to have my share of doing good and resisting evil.' Speech at Bristol 1780." Bullet holes were found in the statue in 2008.
October 12, 1922 - Statue of Edmund Burke, Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC (USA). Copy of a bronze full length statue by British artist James Havard Thomas in Bristol (England). Inscribed "BVRKE 1729-1797. 'Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the trvest wisdom.'" Edmund Burke [1729-1797] was an Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist & philosopher who supported the American Revolution & opposed the French Revolution.


1898 - Gunboat Melik, Nile riverbank, Khartoum (Sudan). "An unlikely symbol of Anglo-Sudanese co-operation, the Melik was a Victorian weapon of high technology and fearsome power, intended to terrorise the Sudanese rebels and to kill as many as possible. It was built in Chiswick (England) in 1896, then shipped in pieces to Egypt, taken by rail across the Nubian Desert, and reassembled at Abadieh on the Nile. From there it led a flotilla of heavily armed gunboats, a vital element in Kitchener's reconquest of Khartoum in 1898... Today the gunboat sits in a bed of dried mud and sand in a grove of mahogany trees, its decks tipped at an angle, the roof collapsing."

1899-1902Second Boer War


About 1905 - Horfield Quaker Meeting House, 300 Gloucester Road, Horfield, Bristol (England). "A peace garden has been created to celebrate the building's centenary. The latest addition is a panel of colourful tiles [right image], which have transformed a plain brick wall into a work of art. The panel is made up of hand-made tiles spelling out the Quaker principles: 'peace, equality, simplicity, truth,' alongside pictures of animals." Info courtesy of Peter van den Dungen.

1906 - Wilberforce House & Statue, Wilberforce House Museum, 23-25 High Street, Hull (England). "Oldest anti-slavery museum in the world... Explores the history of slavery, abolition and the legacy of slavery today. The birthplace of slavery abolitionist William Wilberforce [1759-1833]." One of only 4 "musuems for peace" in the UK (vs. about 70 in the USA).

1908 - Andrew Carnegie Birthplace Museum, 4 Moodie Street, Dunfermline, Fife (Scotland). "In 1895 the Birthplace Cottage was bought as a surprise 60th birthday present for Andrew Carnegie [1835-1919] by his wife Louise & then let out to tenants. With the creation of the Carnegie Dunfermline Trust in 1903, a caretaker was installed, & in 1908 it was opened to the public. Work began in 1925 on the design by architect James Shearer RSA, and the linked buildings of the Cottage and Memorial Hall were formally opened on 28 June 1928. The Museum has undergone many stages of development over the years, including a major upgrade in 2009." Trustee William Black of "the British Carnegie fund" described in GAC's autobiography (page 157).


May 7, 1910 - "Bringer of Peace," Friary Park, Friern Barnet, London (England). Statue by Sydney Simmons dedicated to the memory of King Edward VII [1841-1910] & erected on 7 May 1910, the day after his death. /// "Children used to love climbing up the little stone mountain but there is a small circular fence now to prevent people touching & sitting on it."

1910 - Gippeswyk Park, Ipswich, Suffolk (England). 45-acres presented by Felix Thornley Cobbold MP JP [1841-1909] "to be maintained as a public park and recreation ground, and not to be used for the drilling, or instruction of soldiers, or for any military purposes whatsoever." "Gippeswick was a seventh-century town centred near the quay." Info & photo from Gerard Lössbroek (Pax Christi).


c.1911 - King Edward VII Memorial (aka Angel of Peace), Parade Gardens, Bath, Somerset (England). To the east of Bath Abbey. Outside the Bath rugby stadium. Erected at present site, c.1933. N.A. Irent, sculptor. "Commemorates King Edward VII's diplomatic tactics in Europe, particularly with his cousin the Kaiser in Germany, and his establishment of an entente cordiale with France. The memorial is by N. A. Irent, and was moved to its current site from Milsom Street in 1933. Many similar versions of this statue, known as 'The Peacemaker,' can be found in public parks & squares all over the country." /// "Not a good idea, using copper for a statue, as it stains the stonework green. The imposing building in the background is a hotel."


May 24, 1912 - Statue of Edward the Peacemaker, Lowman Green, Tiverton Devon County (England). Two inscriptions: "Edward the Peacemaker, 1841-1910" & "Presented by Thomas Ford Esq. J.P. to His Native Town." /// From genealogy comment by MaryTurner: "Unveiled on Empire Day. T.Ford aged 94yrs was present. Mr Ford had already given the Clock Tower on the opposite side of Lowman Bridge. He also BUILT & ENDOWED Fords Almshouses plus he also BOUGHT OLD SCHOOL as an endowment for these Almshouses."


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October 12, 1912 - Peace Statue, Kings Road, Brighton/Hove (England). Depicts the Angel of Peace. Unveiled by the Duke of Norfolk. Commemorates King Edward VII [1841-1910] of England for bringing about peace between Argentina & Chile in 1902. See the 1904 statue Cristo Redentor de los Andes / Christ of the Andes in Uspallata Pass of the Andes Mountains between Argentina & Chile. Click here for information about a proposal to add new monuments to the Brighton/Hove seaside.


April 23, 1913 - King Edward VII Memorial, Centenary Square, Birmingham (England). "1910, the King was returned to the city centre for the first time in 60 years following 15 months of restoration work costing £114,000. Made by local sculptor Albert Toft."

1914-1918The Great War or World War I

1916? - Cavell Glacier, Jasper National Park, Alberta (Canada). "Angel Glacier is a hanging glacier that forms in a cirque on the mountain above. Down below, formed by snow falling off the mountain (and in truth, some ice falling off Angel), is the Cavell Glacier. It sits in the bottom of the valley, tucked up against the cliffs, and calves directly into a small lake called Cavell Pond." ("In the U.S. Rocky Mountains, there is Cavell Glacier.")
1918 - "The Murder of Edith Cavell," Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey (USA). Black chalk and black crayon over charcoal on cream wove paper by Anerican artist George Bellows [1882-1925]. Drawn for a series of 12 lithographs he produced depicting atrocities committed by the German armies in Belgium.
1918 - Statue of Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln Square, Mancheser (England). Replica of a statue originally exhibited in New York City in 1916. Cleaned in 2008 for 200th anniversary of end of the Atlantic slave trade. /// "Yesterday I saw for the first time the large & impressive statue of Lincoln in Brazenose Street erected shortly after his death [sic], but the long inscription on the pedestal was hard to read and needs re-doing." - Peter van den Dungen, 12Jul12.

1918? - Memorial Window, St. Mary the Virgin Church, Swardeston, Norfolk (England). "Fragile Martyr" Edith Cavell [1865-1915] was "quite the most famous woman to be killed in World War I." "In Swardeston, where she was born [and her father was rector], the window over the altar of the church is dedicated to her." "Completed before the end of the War by Ernest Heasman. Edith Cavell kneels in her nurse's uniform at the foot of the cross, accompanied by smaller, appropriate figures, including St. Agnes, St. Margaret and Florence Nightingale." Image shows a detail from the window. Click here for other Edith Cavell memorials.


October 22, 1918 - Edith Cavell Memorial, Brussels (Belgium). Inscribed "A Miss Edith Cavell. Hommage a Angleterre." Where is this memorial in Brussels? Does it still exist?


May 1919 - Grave of Edith Cavell, Life’s Green, South Wall, Norwich Cathedral, Norwich, Norfolk (England). Buried after a memorial service at Westminster Abbey on May 15, 1919. Right image shows ceremony on October 9, 2004. Left image copyright © Martin Edwards 2003.


1919 - Edith Cavell Memorial, outside the Erpingham Gate, Norwich Cathedral, Norfolk (England). As a nurse during WW-I, Edith Cavell [1865-1915] "treated friend and foe alike and helped allied soldiers to escape, for which she was executed by the Germans." Click here for other Edith Cavell memorials.


June 13, 1920 - Monument de Miss Edith Cavell, Tuileries, Paris (France). "In Paris' Tuileries there is a beautiful sculpture of her." Click here to see four proposed monuments. Date from New York Times.



About 1920 -Memorial for Edith Cavell [1865-1915] & Marie Depage [1872-1915], Clinique Edith Cavell / Kliniek Edith Cavell, Edith Cavell Inter-Regional Hospital Centre (CHIREC), rue Edith Cavell 32, Uccle / Ukkel, Brussels (Belgium). Depicts two alegorical figures, one of whom is winged. Erected just after World War I for two female martyrs of the war. Still stands in front the successor institution (lower two images). Click here for more monuments for Edith Cavell.


About 1920 - Peace Memorial, Delly Green, Hailey (Witney Parish), Oxfordshire (England). "A 'Peace Memorial' on Delly green, in the form of a small domed temple supported on four columns, was erected about 1920 by Mrs. Phipps of Hailey Manor, and a war memorial cross near the church in Middletown about the same time." Click here for more about the phrase "peace memorial" (used in many parts of the British Commonwealth after World War I).

- About 1920 - Memorial Pillars, Runnymede Meadow, A308 Highway, Berkshire, Surrey (England). Also called kiosks. Designed by Edwin Lutyens [1869-1944]. "A water-meadow alongside the River Thames & just over 20 miles (32 km) west of central London. Notable for its association with the sealing of Magna Carta in 1215 & as a consequence is the site of a collection of memorials." /// "In December 1929, the historic Runnymede Meadow, with adjoining lands totaling 182 acres (0.74 km2) twenty miles (32 km) southwest of London, where the civil freedoms of Magna Charta were agreed to in 1215, was presented to the National Trust by Lady Fairhaven and her two sons in memory of Urban Hanlon Broughton [1857-1929]."
- 1957 - Magna Carta Memorial, Runnymede (England). Erected by the American Bar Association (ABA).
- May 14, 1965 - Kennedy Memorial, Runnymede (England). "This acre of English ground was given to the United States of America by the people of Britain in memory of John F. Kennedy."

1920's - Ashtead Peace Memorial Hall, Woodhead Lane, Ashtead, Mole Valley District, Surry (England). "Where Ashtead meets." Click here for more about the phrase "peace memorial."
Date? - Peace Memorial Hall (PMH), Codicote Hertfordshire (England). "Inside the PMH, as it is usually known [sic], are two Memorial Boards listing those who served in the Forces during the two World Wars."

Date? - Peace Memorial, Fair Oak Square, Fair Oak Village, Eastleigh Borough, Hampshire (England). Also called "Hampshire War Memorial." Related to World War I?
1921 - Peace Memorial Park, Wigston, Leicestershire (England). "Recently rejuvenated with a Heritage Lottery Fund grant, the park now boasts an award-winning pavilion... An active Friends Group [partnered] with the council [to achieve] the lottery grant and continues to be involved in the ongoing management of the park."

1923 - War Memorial Sculpture, Michael Sadler Building, Leeds University, Leeds (England). "The radical sculptor, Eric Gill [1882-1940], was commissioned to produce a war memorial for the University of Leeds. In 1923 he presented a frieze of the gospel story of Jesus driving the money-changers out of the temple. Those expelled were dressed as contemporary Leeds merchants. Gill’s message was that the ‘money men’ were a key cause of the war. This controversial artwork challenges us to ask whether the pressures of wealth and human greed still lead to war in the 21st century."



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1920's? - Plaque, Manse, United Reformed Church of UK, Embleton, Northumberland (England). Text of plaque: "William Thomas Stead, 1849-1912, world renowned journalist and apostle of peace, was born here, July 5th 1849." Image of plaque courtesy of Colin Archer, general secretary, International Peace Bureau (IPB), Geneva (Switzerland). He wrote August 6, 2011: "The phrase apostle of peace is not modern. Nor is the design. ...but I have no clue [about its date]. 1920's when peace sentiment was high?" /// "URC was formed in [1972] through a merger of the Congregational Union & Presbyterian Church of England. This is the denomination that new-church leader Gerald Coates described acerbically as 'a marriage of two coffins.' It is often claimed to be neither united nor reformed, but, alongside Methodism, it is one of the main non-conformist denominations in the UK. Stead's father was the Presbyterian minister." The family moved away before Stead was two years old.
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Date? - Plaque on House of William Thomas Stead, Smith Square, Westminister, London (England). Stead went down with the Titanic on April 15, 1912. See duplicate memorials to Stead & in Central Park, New York City (1915), & on the Strand in London (1920).

November 11, 1926 - Penkridge Peace Memorial Hall, Penkridge (England). "A charity managed by a Committee dedicated to providing a meeting place for various events throughout the year. Organisations or individuals can hire the hall. Its interior was refurbished in 2006... Engraved on the plaque is a winged angel with an inscription at the botton 'Peace The...(?)' [indistinct]..." /// Click here for other "peace memorials"created soon after World War I.

March 1927 - Hauteville House, 38 rue Hauteville, St. Peter Port (Guernsey). Where Victor Hugo [1802-1885] lived & worked 1855-1870 during his exile from France. Donated to the City of Paris by Hugo's descendants in March 1927. Currently houses a French honorary consul & a Victor Hugo museum. House has four levels, with the top floor featuring a glazed lookout over surrounding islands. The garden is filled with trees & flowers growing in abundance due to the mild climate. House & garden are preserved as they were & are both open to the public. /// As president of the 2nd International Peace Congress in Paris, August 22-24, 1849, Hugo called for the creation of a United States of Europe. On Bastille Day (July 14) 1870, he planted at Hauteville House an oak (which still flourishes today), predicting that when the tree was mature the United States of Europe would have become a reality." NB: The Franco-Prussian War began July 19, 1870. Information courtesy of Gerard Lössbroek.
July 14, 1870 - Chêne des Etats-Unis d'Europe / United States of Europe Oak, au fond du jardin, Hauteville House (qv), 38 rue Hauteville, St. Peter Port (Guernsey). "Victor Hugo planta le 14 juillet 1870, quelques jours avant la déclaration de guerre de la France à la Prusse. 'Aujourd'hui 14 juillet 1870 [Bastille Day], à une heure de l'après-midi, mon jardinier Tourtel m'assistant en présence de mon fils Charles, petit Georges et petite Jeanne étant là, j'ai planté dans mon jardin le gland [acorn] d'où sortira le chêne que je baptise : "Chêne des Etats-Unis d'Europe." Dans une lettre à Paul Meurice, il écrivit : ' Il ne peut sortir de cette guerre que la fin des guerres et que les Etats-Unis d'Europe. Vous les verrez. Je ne les verrai pas. Pourquoi? C'est parce que je les ai prédits. J'ai le premier, le 17 juillet 1851, prononcé (au milieu des huées) ce mot : "les Etats-Unis d'Europe". Donc j'en serai exclu. Jamais les Moïses ne virent les Chanaans.' Le 13 septembre 1870, de retour en France, il note : 'Julie (jeune soeur de Madame Hugo qui continuera à habiter Hauteville après le départ de Victor Hugo en 1870) m'écrit de Guernesey [sic] que le gland planté par moi le 14 juillet a germé. Le chêne des Etats-Unis d'Europe est sorti de terre le 5 septembre, jour de ma rentrée à Paris.'" Information courtesy of Gerard Lössbroek.


About 1930? - Statue of Emily Hobhouse, Parish Church, St. Ive, Cornwall (England). There are many memorials for social activist & Second Boer War relief worker Emily Hobhouse [1860-1926]. Click for bust, plaque (June 8, 1994), scenic lounge, hotel suite, street, and old age home. Also see the 1913 National Women's Monument in Bloemfontein (South Africa) where her ashes are distributed. She & her brother, liberal politician Leonard Trelawny Hobhouse [1864-1929], were both born in St Ive. Photo taken 26 January 2010 courtesy of Lisa Heeley, Paddy Long & Gerard Lössbroek.

Date? - Richmond Castle, Richmond, North Yorkshire (England). The castle's Exhibition Centre includes a virtual reality touch-screen guide about the imprisonment in the castle of the concientious objectors in the First World War. Concientious objectors, conscripted into the army and sent to join the Non Combatant Corps at Richmond, were put in the cells as a result of their refusal to obey orders." One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009.

1932 - The Resurrection of the Soldiers, Sandham Memorial Chapel, Burghclere (England). Fresco by Stanley Spencer [1891-1959]. "...one of his most important works. ...part of a monumental cycle of paintings commemorating World War I. ...shows the soldiers climbing out of their graves bearing white crosses & reuniting with their dead comrades in all manner of embrace. The men are touching everything & also clasping each other -- some men (in the background of the painting) are lying close to the mules, one man kneels at Christ’s side, his head in his lap, one man caresses a turtle, while another clasps a dove to his chest. Of the painting, Spencer, who was a soldier in the war, wrote, 'During the war, I felt the only way to end the ghastly experience would be if everyone suddenly decided to indulge in every degree or form of sexual love, carnal love, bestiality, anything you like to call it. These are the joyful inheritances of mankind.'"


1938 - Peace Cairn, Bellahouston Park, Glasgow, Scotland (UK). "Erected for the 1938 Empire Exhibition. Has numerous shaped blocks of stone within it, on which are engraved the names of the organisations & clans that attended the exhibition which were deeply concerned with the real possibility of war. The modern steel globe on top was added in July 2004 & features [the word] 'Peace' in different languages. It was designed by Elspeth Bennie, Ironhorse Studios, as part of the 'Grounds for Play' project."

November 23, 1938 - Welsh National Temple of Peace and Health (Temple of Peace), Cardiff (Wales). A non-religious civic building designed by the architect Sir Percy Thomas. Across the street from the National Assembly. One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009.

1939-1945World War II


1940 - "Cross of Nails," Coventry Cathedral, Coventry (England). "Shortly after the destruction [on 14 November 1940], the cathedral stonemason, Jock Forbes, noticed that two of the charred medieval roof timbers had fallen in the shape of a cross. He set them up in the ruins where they were later placed on an altar of rubble with the moving words ‘Father Forgive’ inscribed on the Sanctuary wall. Another cross was fashioned from three medieval nails by local priest, the Revd Arthur Wales. The Cross of Nails has become the symbol of Coventry’s ministry of reconciliation." /// Right image is "an abstract interpretation of the Charred Cross in the old cathedral ruins." /// "In post conflict Europe of the 1950's & 1960's, the presentation of a Cross of Nails to churches in Kiel, Dresden, Berlin & other cities destroyed by Allied bombing, symbolized peace & the growing trust & partnership that developed." See Nikolaikirche (Hamburg), Chapel of Reconciliation (Berlin Wall Memorial, Berlin), Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church (Berlin), Friedenszeichen / Coventry Peace Monument (Lindau), and elsewhere.


VJ Day, 1945 - Fort William-Dudley Memorial & Peace Cairn, Summit of Ben Nevis, near Fort William, Scotland (UK). "At 1,344 metres (4,409 ft) above sea level, Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in the British Isles. It attracts an estimated 100,000 ascents a year. The summit features the ruins of an observatory, which was permanently staffed between 1883 & 1904." /// "Immediately prior to the John Muir Trust's purchasing Ben Nevis [in 2000], the Peace cairn was relocated & restored by the Peace Cairn Trust. JMT recognises its symbolic value & its place in universal aspirations for world peace; however it is also a focal point attracting further unwanted plaques & memorials. Ideally the JMT believes that a more appropriate site for this structure would be in Glen Nevis, a location that would be accessible to everyone."" See Peace Cairn in Hiroshima (Japan). 2001 - Monument to Bert Bissell, Coronation Gardens, Priory Road, Dudley, Black Country (England). "Bert Bissell [1902-1998] was holder of the Methodist peace prize, president of Vicar Street Bible class in Dudley & founder of the Peace Cairn on Ben Nevis mountain [on VJ Day, 1945]."

About 1945 - Italian Chapel, near Kirkwall, Orkney Islands (Scotland). "Visit this tiny gem, when crossing the Churchill Barriers to the islands south of Kirkwall (main town on Orkney). During the second world war, Italian prisoners from Africa were brought to Orkney to labour on the Churchill Barriers, connecting the small islands and blocking the channels to German U-boats seeking to destroy the British Navel fleet in Scapa Floe. The Chapel is exquisite and a powerful symbol of peace - the only remaining hut from the prison camp."


September 8, 1945 - Peace Stone, Nether Kellet, Lancashire (England). Inscription: "This tribute to a lasting peace was planted by T.C. Butler-Cole, Esq of Tunstall House and Mrs S.T. Whalan of this village at the Nether Kellet peace celebrations on the 8th Sept 1945 to commemorate the cessation of hostilities in the 2nd World War 3rd Sept 1939 - 15 Aug 1945."

August 14 & 15, 1947Independence of Pakistan & India

October 16, 1949 - Plaque, Beachy Head, West Sussex (England). Text: "On this headland and the surrounding Downs in the years of the Second World War between 1939 and 1945, the men and women of the Allied Forces helped defend their country... This plaque also commemoratres the epic Dieppe Raid in 1942, which was partly conrolled from the radar stration on this headland. Beachy Head is once more in peace. But the devotion and patriotism of those who operated on this strech of Downland in Britain's greatest time of suffering will not be forgotten."
1986? - Beachy Head Peace Path, Beachy Head, West Sussex (England). Commemorates the UN International Year of Peace (1986). "A 750 metre circular route starting opposite the main Beachy Head car park and leading to a viewpoint on the Head. One of several trails in the South Downs suitable for people with impaired mobility, wheelchairs, mobility scooters and push chairs." One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009.


November 13-19, 1950 - Second World Peace Conference, Sheffield (England). Poster by Pablo Picasso [1881-1973] says "Second World Conference of the Defenders of Peace." Picasso is the only international intellectual allowed into the UK by the Labour government for this conference, and he consequently refuses to attend. "The World Peace Congress (WPC) emerged from a Communist-led peace congress held at Wroclaw (Poland) in 1948. A subsequent congress in Paris & Prague in 1949 set up a World Committee of Partisans for Peace, and a congress in Sheffield & Warsaw in 1950 reconstituted the Partisans as the World Peace Council (WPC)."


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February 1, 2012? - Peace Doves, opposite Peace Gardens, St. Paul's Parade, Sheffield (England). "Stainless steel sculpture by Sheffield artist Richard Bartle. Features seven life-size doves perched on chimney of Bar Ha!Ha! (now Browns Bar & Brasserie) next to the Peace Gardens. Inspired by Pablo Picasso’s visit to the Second World Peace Congress held in Sheffield in 1950. Pablo Picasso [1881-1973] arrived at Sheffield Midland railway station carrying a bouquet of chrysanthemums & wearing an old raincoat & blue beret. He was welcomed by members of the local communist party, the press & the public, and taken on a tour of the city. He ate a bacon sandwich at Thorpe's cafe in Fargate; had his hair trimmed at Peckitt's barbers, and drew a 'dove of peace' on a napkin in Butler’s Dining Rooms. The Congress was to be a special debate on the Korean War, but the Government at the time refused to allow important speakers into the country, & it was abandoned. Picasso gave a short speech, recalling that he had learnt to paint doves from his father, and ending by saying 'I stand for life against death; I stand for peace against war.' Later whilst returning to London he drew another Dove of Peace on a napkin, which he gave to the bodyguard who had accompanied him around the city. This drawing is now part of Sheffield Galleries & Museums Trust’s collection and is now on permanent display at Weston Park Museum. Richard Bartle has used the original poster [from 1949], designed by Picasso, as a template to create the sculpture, in celebration of the memory of Picasso and the cause of peace that he introduced into an already radically thinking Sheffield..."

1953 - Alfrick Peace Memorial Hall, Clay Green, Alfrik & Lulsley (England). Adjacent to the Village Playing Field. Click here for more about the phrase "peace memorial."
1950's - Peace Window, Canterbury Cathedral, England (UK). Designed by Hungarian refugee Ervin Bossany.

June 15, 1968 - Acorns for Peace, Unity Lawn, Coventry Cathedral, Coventry (England). "John Lennon and Yoko Ono visited Coventry Cathedral in 1968 to plant acorns as part of their Acorns For Peace tour (as mentioned in The Ballad of John and Yoko). The acorns were, sadly, stolen." "The couple's very first peace event and as part of the cathedral's sculptural exhibition. The acorns were planted on an east-west axis, symbolizing both John and Yoko's love and peace between east and west." Click here for more Lennon & Ono peace monuments..

Date? - "The Lion & Lamb" Public House (Pub), Stortford Road (B1256), Near Stansted Airport, Little Canfield, Near Takeley, Dunmow, Essex (England).
Date? - "Lion & Lamb" Public House (Pub), Milton, near Cambridge (England).
Date? - Lion & Lamb Statue, Lion & Lamb Yard, Farnham (England). "Bringing the name to life, this wooden statue of a Lion and Lamb dominates the top end of the yard of that name and provides a safe playing place for children"

Date? - St Aidan's Peace Church, Church Street, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland (England). One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009. "Joy Mitchell, 67, from Berwick, who leads the town's Peace Church, was sentenced to seven days in Cornton Vale prison after failing to pay a fine for her part in the Trident Ploughshare blockade of Faslane [submarine base, Scotland] on 14 February."


August 2, 1972 - Peace Cairn, Hiroshima Memorial Peace Park, Hiroshima (Japan). Donated by the cities of Dudley (England) & Fort William (Scotland). Text of inscription: ""This particular stone was hewn from Britain's highest mountain BEN NEVIS FORT WILLIAM SCOTLAND, 2nd August 1972." Info from Pocket Peace Guide. See 1945 Peace Cairn on Ben Nevis.

May 4, 1977 - "Reconcilation,", J.B. Priestley Library, University of Bradford, Bradford (England). Original statue by Josefina de Vasconcellos [1903-2004]. Unveiled by 1974 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Seán MacBride [1904-1988]. Originally called "Reunion." /// Vandalized by fire on May 25, 2011. Click here for air view. Four copies (paid for by Sir Richard Branson) are in Belfast, Berlin, Coventry & Hiroshima (qv).


1980 - Milton Keynes Peace Pagoda, Willen Lake, Milton Keynes (England). Nipponzan Myohoji Buddhist Order. "This is the first Peace Pagoda in the western world." There is a Nipponzan Myohoji monastery nearby. Click here for many other Nipponzan Myohoji peace pagodas in all parts of the world.

Date? - "Monument to the evacuation of the Gibraltarians 1940-1951," Waterport Avenue, adjoining North Mole (Gibraltar). "The British Government's decision to enforce mass evacuation from the then Crown colony of Gibraltar, in order to increase the strength of The Rock with more British Armed Forces personnel, meant that most Gibraltarians (some for up to ten years) had nowhere to call home. Only those civilians with essential jobs were allowed to stay. However, this event gave the entire community a heightened sense of 'Britishness' by sharing in the war effort."

September 1981 - Greenham Common Woman's Peace Camp, RAF Greenham Common, Berkshire (England). "The last missiles left the camp in 1991 as a result of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, but the camp remained in place until 2000 after protestors won the right to house a memorial on the site." Click here for Wikipedia article. "Greenham Peace Garden" is one of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009.

April-June 1982Falklands War


June 12, 1982 - Faslane Peace Camp, alongside Faslane Naval Base, Argyll & Bute (Scotland). This peace camp still exists & appears to be permanent. Click here for Wikipedia article.

1982 - Kinder Mass Trespass Plaque, near Hayfield (England). "The Kinder Mass Trespass was an act of civil disobedience by young men from Manchester & Sheffield intended to secure free access to England’s mountains & moorlands. The ramblers walked from Bowden Bridge Quarry to climb the hill called Kinder Scout in the Derbyshire Peak District on April 24, 1932. The protest led to improved access to the countryside in the shape of national parks (from 1949), long-distance footpaths starting with the Pennine Way (opened in 1965) & various forms of the desired 'right to roam.'" This is "Monday's Monument" #53.


December 1983 - Mandela Gardens, Millennium Square (SE corner), Calverley Street, Leeds (England). "Officially reopened" in April 2001 by Nelson Mandela. Feature a 16-foot bronze statue entitled "Both Arms" by Leeds-born sculptor Kenneth Armitage [1916-2002]. "The arms express a feeling of welcome and are envisaged as a monument to friendship."

1985 - Peace Bell, Fort William (Scotland). "Celebrates the bond of friendship between Dudley (England), Hiroshima (Japan) & Fort William (Scotland). Also commemorates the [1945] international peace cairn [qv] on the summit of Ben Nevis. One of the main forces behind this was Bert Bissell, M.B.E. [1902-1998], from Dudley in the West Midlands. The inscription reads 'May we all work together for peace and goodwill and live together as one great family.' The bell came from the old town hall, and the granite plinth came from parts of the old fort at Fort William." /// See 1945 Peace Cairn on Ben Nevis (Scotland) & 1972 Peace Cairn in Hiroshima (Japan).


1985? - Hiroshima & Nagasaki Peace Memorial flower bed 1945 - 1985, Memorial Gardens behind St. Georges Hall, William Brown Street, Liverpool (England).
Date? - RoadPeace Memorial, Liverpool (England).


August 6, 1985 - The Peace Gardens, Sheffield (England). Laid out in 1938 and formally called St. Paul's Gardens. Officially renamed "Peace Gardens" on Hiroshima Day 1985. Rededicated on December 9, 1998. " Overlooking the city’s gothic town hall, the garden is bounded by several cascades & occupies an area of 0.67 hectares. The Goodwin Fountain with over 80 jets of water is dedicated to Sir Stuart Goodwin, the founder of an important Sheffield steel & toolmaking firm." Click here for the Wikipedia article.


After September 18, 1985 - Grave of Gerald Holtom, Kent & Sussex Cemetery & Crematorium, Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent (England). Inscription: "To the memory of Gerald Herbert Holtom, A Campaigner for Peace - May He Find Peace. Died 18th September 1985, Aged 71 Years." "Gerald Herbert Holtom [1914-1985] created the CND peace symbol on February 21, 1958. At that time, he was working with the Direct Action Committee against Nuclear War. Holtom was a dedicated peacemaker & graduate of the Royal College of Arts. During World War II, he worked on a farm in England as a conscientious objector." Note peace symbols in upper corners of the tombstone.


Before 1986 - Manchester Peace Gardens, St. Peter's Square, Manchester (England). Part of "Manchester City of Peace." /// "The small but attractive peace garden is going to make way for a tram station, I was told yesterday when in Manchester. At least one monument has already been (re)moved. Also the large war memorial nearby will be affected (St. Peter’s Square)." - Peter van den Dungen, 12Jul12. /// "The cenotaph will be relocated and the entire square redeveloped into a new public space." - Wikipedia article on St. Peter's Square Metrolink Station..


April 1986 - "Messenger of Peace," Manchester Peace Gardens, St. Peter's Square, Manchester (England). Sculpted by Barbara Pearson. Also called "peace statue" and "the pigeon woman."
1988 - Manchester Peace Group, St. Peter's Square, Manchester (England). Unveiled by the Lord Mayor. Composite, life-size and a third, by Philip Jackson.

1980's? - Peace Garden, Tilgate Park, Crawley, West Sussex (England). "In the 80s, Crawley was declared a nuclear free zone. The Peace Garden is an incredibly serene & beautiful place to spend some time & reflect." One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009.

1988 - National Garden of Peace, behind the Temple of Peace, Cardiff (Wales). Marks the 50th anniversary of the Temple of Peace (qv). Home to a number of commemorative trees & plaques, including a colourful plaque to mark the 20th anniversary of the walk from Cardiff to Greenham Common. "The first ever Welsh monument to Conscientious Objection was unveiled in the National Garden of Peace on 15 May 2005" (qv).

1989 - Quaker Tapestry, Friends Meeting House, Kendal, Cumbria (England). A chronicle of Quaker life over 350 years. 77 hand-crafted embroidery panels, beautifully illustrated by 4,000 men, women and children from 15 countries. Click here for Quaker monuments worldwide.

November 9, 1989Berlin Wall Falls; End of the Cold War

"Reconciliation Triangle:" Five identical monuments by Stephen Broadbent expressing remorse for the slave trade.

Sept. 19, 1990 - Concert Street, Liverpool (England). One of the 3 originals. Also in Belfast & Glasgow.
2007 - Liverpool (England). Miniatures cast on 20th anniversary of the Slave Trade Act.
2007? - Cotonou? (Benin). A former source of slaves.
March 30, 2007 - Richmond, Virginia (USA). On site of a former slave market.

October 3, 1990 - Nuclear Test Veterans' Memorial, St. John's Gardens, Liverpool (England). "Dedicated to the memory of test Veterans who have died since the British tests at Monte Bello, Emnfield [sic], Maralinga, Malden Island, Christmas Island [Australia]. All we seek is justice." British Nuclear Test Veterans Association (BNTVA).
1998 - Nuclear Test Veterans' Memorial Stone, St. Peter's Church, Kirkgate, Leeds (England). British Nuclear Test Veterans Association (BNTVA). "The veterans claim that many of the illnesses they have incurred are due to radioactive exposure from the tests [in Australia]."


November 14, 1990 - Fridenszeichen / Peace Monument, Lake Konstance (Bodensee), Lindau, Bravaria (Germany). According to Peter van den Dungen, "Very near to where the Friedensmuseum Landau (Friedens Raeume / Peace Rooms) is located. Sculpted by Dietrich Foerster, the winner of a competition organised by the Akademie der Bildenden Kuenste in Munich. A bronze plaque explains that it was unveiled on the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Coventry cathedral, and concludes with "Dona Nobis Pacem."

1991 - Lockerbie Memorial Window, Lower Town Hall, Lockerbie (Scotland). Stained glass art by glasspainter John K. Clark. "Depicts the flags of all nations which lost citizens in the Lockerbie disaster when Pan Am flight 103 was blown apart above the Scottish border town on Dec. 21, 1988. All 269 passengers and crew, on the Pan Am flight 103 and 11 people on the ground were killed in the bombing." Click here for other memorials in Lockerbie.

June 1993 - "Symmetry" (Wilfred Owen Memorial), Shrewsbury Abbey Foregate, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (England). Sculpture by Paul de Monchaux. Inscribed "I am the enemy you killed, my friend" from " Strange Meeting." "Wilfred Owen [1893-1918] [is] best known for his angry poetry on the supposed nobility and glory of war. But while he was compassionate to those around him, he was not self-pitying and earned the Military Cross for his bravery... [He] was killed leading his men across the Sambre-Oise canal in northern France just seven days before the peace was signed." One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009.

October 1, 2011 - Museum, Maison forestière de l'Ermitage / Ermitage forester's house, Bois-l'Évêque, Ors, Nord (France). Where English soldier poet Winfred Owen [1893-1918] spent his last night. Transformed by Turner Prize nominee Simon Patterson into a white sculptured memorial to Owen & his poetry. Ors is on the Sambre-Oise Canal where Owen died exactly seven days before the end of World War I.

Early 1990's - E. F. Schumacher Forest Garden, Dartington Estate, Totnes, Devon (England). "Perhaps one of the important examples of perennial agriculture, and a demonstration that this is a viable and productive method of food production in the cool temeprate climate of Britain."


June 6, 1995 - Peace Memorial, Stratford-Upon-Avon (England). Sculpted by Brent Hayward. Dedicated by the Bishop of Coventry. Inscription on front: "Peace I Give To You." Inscription on back: "Commemorates 50 years of peace between the nations of Western Europe 1945-1995."

1995 - "Reconcilation," Coventry Cathedral, Coventry (England). Statue by Josefina de Vasconcellos [1903-2004]. See original in Bradford (England), 1977. Three otther copies are in Belfast, Berlin & Hiroshima (qv).

1995 - Peace Garden, Pinner Memorial Park, Pinner, Middlesex (England). Marks the 50th anniversary of the end of the Second World War. One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009.


1995 - St. Thomas's Peace Garden, St. Thomas Church, Bath Row (off Broad Street), Birmingham (England). "Grounds laid out in 1955 to commemorate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II & redesigned in 1995 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of WW-II." /// "Built around the tower & west porticos of a church which was half demolished by enemy action in 1940 & never restored. Garden created when "The Colonnade" was moved to St. Thomas Church from what is now Centenary Square. Railings with doves of peace sculpted by Anuradha Patel." Left image shows Gate of Peace.


October 22, 1997 - Bust of Mahatma Gandhi, Saughton Winter Garden, Saughton Park, Edinburgh (Scotland). Sculpted by Kirti Mandir (Kenyan born British citizen of Indian origin working in Glenbuck, Ayrshire). "Unveiled by Dr. Indrakumar Gulzar, Prime Minister of India, in the presence of Mr. Goyel, Consul General of India for Scotland, & the Lord Provost of Edinburgh." Information courtesy of Kirti Mandir 06Jan13.


December 1997 - Bradford City of Peace Plaque, Centenary Square, Bradford (England). Dedicated on the occasion of the International Peace Run (Hindu Marathon).
Date? - Hiroshima & Nagasaki Plaque, Centenary Square, Bradford (England).

February 16, 1998 - Angel of the North, Gateshead (England). Steel sculpture of an angel, standing 66 feet (20 m) tall, with wings measuring 178 feet (54 m) across — making it wider than the Statue of Liberty's height. Designed by Antony Gormley.

June 26, 1998 - Dhamma-Talaka Peace Pagoda, Buddhist Centre, Edgbaston, Ladywood district, Birmingham (England). "The pagoda is provided so that western people are able to learn about Buddhism. The main financial support however comes from generous donations by the Myanmar community around the country." The Venerable Dr. Rewata Dhamma is a senior Burmese Buddhist Monk who is the prime mover behind the building of the pagoda.


Late 1998 - The Peace Museum, historic Commercial Bank building, Piece Hall Yard, Bradford (England). Office opened in 1994; gallery opened in 1998. Close to Department of Peace Studies, University of Bradford, which was the site of 1st International Conference of the International Network of Museums for Peace (INMP) in 1992. One of only 4 "musuems for peace" in the UK (vs. about 70 in the USA).

1999 - "The Hand of Peace," British Legion Barnards Green Garden of Remembrance, Barnards Green, Malvern (England). Sculpture in Portland stone by artist & author Rose Garrard. "Commemorates the people who were killed in wars and conflicts."
Date? - Peace Fountain, Birmingham (England). Nothing more known about this monument.

2000 - "Non-Violence" (Knotted Gun), Cavern Walks Shopping Centre, Mathew Street, Liverpool (England). Next door to the Cavern Club where the Beatles played in early days. Unveiled by Dr. Michael Nobel, head of the Nobel family society & chairman of the Non-Violence Foundation. Sculpted by Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd. Supported by Yoko Ono in memory of John Lennon [1940-1980]. Click here for other examples of the same sculpture, including the original at the UN in New York City. Click here for other Lennon & Ono monuments.

2000 - Peace Centre, Peace Drive, Great Sankey, Warrington (England). The full name is Tim Parry & Johnathan Ball Young People's Centre, named after two children who were killed by an IRA bomb in Warrington town centre on March 20, 1993. Home of the Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Foundation for Peace, an educational peace charity.

Date? - War Memorial Shelter, Nether Wasdale, Cumbria (England). One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009. Image shows War Memorial Tablet (plaque) installed atop Great Gable mountain on June 8, 1924, to commemorate members of the Fell & Rock Climbing Club (FRCC) who died in the First World War.

Date? - Birthplace of Lord Boyd Orr, Holland Green, Fenwick Road, Kilmaurs, East Ayrshire (Scotland). Lord Boyd Orr [1880-1971] received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1949. Has this house been opened to the public or otherwise become a "monument"? If so, when?


January 9, 2001 - Peace, J.B. Priestley Library, University of Bradford, Bradford (England). "There are two copies of this in the library, on the ground floor and in the Commonweal Collection room, on the second floor. Chris Hoggett created both, he being the brother to David Hoggett, the first Commonweal Librarian. The word 'peace' is inscribed on the base of the sculpture in fifty-three different languages."


June 2001 - Shot at Dawn Memorial, National Memorial Arboretum, Lichfield, Staffordshire (England). Commemorates the 306 British & Commonwealth soldiers executed for cowardice & desertion during World War I. Portrays a young British soldier blindfolded and tied to a stake in anticipation of execution by firing squad. Created by artist Andy DeComyn & unveiled by Mrs. Gertrude Harris, daughter of Private Harry Farr who was executed on October 16, 1916.


2002 - Gardens of Peace Muslim Cemetery, Elmbridge Road, Hainault (England). "Truly! To Allah we belong and truly, to Him we shall return.” (Sura 2: 156).


July 25, 2002 - Liverpool John Lennon Airport, Liverpool (England). Renamed in 2002 in honour of John Lennon, a founding member of the Liverpudlian group the Beatles, twenty-two years after Lennon's death. A 7 ft (2.1 m) tall bronze statue of the local icon stands overlooking the check-in hall. On the roof is painted the airport's motto, a line from Lennon's song "Imagine:" "Above us, only sky." In 2005 the Yellow Submarine, a large-scale work of art, was installed on a traffic island at the entrance to the airport.


October 5, 2002 - Greenham Common Commemorative & Historic Site, RAF Greenham Common, Berkshire (England). Includes a six-foot high steel sculpture of a campfire, with a circle of seven standing stones within a landscaped setting. The sculptures symbolise the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp (qv) that occupied the site from September 1981 until 2000.

July 20, 2003 - Peace Scupture (Greenham March Statue), City Hall, Cardiff (Wales). By Anton Agius [1956-2008] of Malta. Inscriptions: Her soul ignited goodness on our nuclear land; The burning bush of her sacrifice and faith will never be extinguished." -- Vernon Jones. Also "She will keep alive the memory of this womens action for peace which started from Cardiff in 1981 and went around the world." One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009. Click here to see article which accompanies the far right image.


July 31, 2003 - World Peace Flame (WPF), Dru Worldwide Course Centre, Snowdonia Mountain Lodge, Nant Ffrancon, Bethesda, Bangor, Gwynedd (Wales). Third of seven WPF's sponsored by the WPF Foundation in Heteren (Netherlands). The other six WPF's are in the Netherlands, Australia (New South Wales) & the USA (Tennessee).

October 19, 2003 - Mayors for Peace Monument & Tree, Park Square, Leeds (England). "Commemorates the 23 million people killed in conflicts since 1945." Planted by Mayor Tadatoshi Akiba of Hiroshima & Mayor Iccho Itoh of Nagasaki. (Itoh was assassinated in Nagasaki on April 17, 2007.)


2004 - Coventry Peace Trail, Coventry (England). Guides visitors to more than 30 landmarks beginning at the ruins of Coventry Cathedral and concludes in the scenic Priory Gardens. Described in a 12-page booklet published by the city. Image shows logo of Coventry Peace Month 2004.


Date? - 3 Trees Peace Trail, Coventry (England). "A 'Three Trees Peace Garden' can be found in all 18 wards of the city. The result is 18 magical places of peace linked together to create Coventry's first ever peace trail." Each garden has a triangular planting of Hazel, Maple and Holly representing Coventry's three spires and is dedicated to one of the 18 countries with whom Coventry shares a sister city:" Parkes (Australia), Dunaujvaros & Kecskemet (Hungary), Dresden & Kiel (Germany), three Coventrys in CT, MA & RI (USA), Kingston (Jamaica), Cornwall, Granby & Windsor (Canada), Volgograd (Russia), Belgrade (Serbia), Galati (Romania), etc.


May 4, 2005 - Peace Garden, York St. John University (YSJ), Lord Mayor's Walk, York (England). "The Japanese-style Peace Garden is a special haven & contains the 'Hiroshima' tree. The entrance gate is next to Chaplaincy." "Contains the Hiroshima Peace Tree which was grown from the seed of a tree which survived the Hiroshima bombing." One of 13 sites on the MAW Peace Map of the British Isles as of January 2009. /// Left image shows Yukari Ino & Aya Tarutani with origami peace cranes in the Peace Garden." Right image shows the Hiroshima Tree in 2015. It was obtained in 2005 by Hisashi Nakamura (expert on Japanese constitution). He also changed the name of the garden from Chapel Garden to Peace Garden against the strong protest from some Christians at YSJ.

May 15, 2005 - Welsh monument to Conscientious Objection, National Garden of Peace, Cardiff (Wales). Inscription: "If the right to life is the first of all human rights, being the one on which all other rights depend, the right to refuse to kill must be the second."


2005 - Memorial Cairn, between Dunscore Kirk & the village graveyard, Dunscore, Dumfries & Galloway (Scotland). Memorializes Jane Haining [1897-1944], Church of Scotland missionary, who worked with Jewish children in Budapest (Hungary) & was killed at Auschwitz (one of only ten Holocaust victims from Scotland.)


2005 - Bradford Peace Trail: A Walk Around Bradford, City of Peace, Bradford (England). Created by Bradford: City For Peace and The Peace Museum (qv). "A total of 29 different locations all with a story to tell." Click here for a 7-minute video of the trail on YouTube.


2005 - "Connect," Imperial War Museum North, Manchester (England). By ceramatist Peter Lewis, University of Bolton. "This project began in Manchester moving to Ramallah in the Occupied Territories. For the Palestinian children it was an opportunity to participate in an experience that looked beyond their immediate situation. Many children have been traumatised by events and their education fragmented due to continued occupation, sporadic incursions and curfews. The project encouraged each group to consider their immediate environment, including likes/dislikes, hopes, desires & aspirations for the future, their daily routines and experiences being documented. The visual images & text generated from the project was used to create the figurative piece." Note UK & Palestinian flags on left arm.


2005 - "Captured Africans," St. George's Quay, Lancaster (England). "Inaugurated in September 2002, STAMP (Slave Trade Arts Memorial Project) was an ambitious arts education outreach project which culminated in a permanent memorial to Lancaster's role in the slave trade in 2005." Lancaster was the UK's 4th largest slave port.


2005 - Peace monument, Coppins Green School, Clacton-on-Sea (England). "Concrete and blocks using the themes of Seek Peace, Stop War, Love Life." Note by sculptor Ray Brooks: "I was asked to create a War Memorial, part of a commemoration for the end of the 1939-45 war in Europe. As I am still, as ever, a peace loving old hippy, I did not feel I could do this, but did offer to build them a 'Peace Monument.' This resulted in some very moving and powerful work, during the days following the London Underground bombings, with over 800 kids and staff at Coppins Green School, and a number of war veterans, British Legion, local politicians and councillors."

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Date? - Bristol Slavery Trail, Bristol (England). "This is a town trail with a difference. It aims to show you what the handsome squares and quaint buildings of a pleasant English city have to do with one of the ugliest and most destructive events in human history... the Transatlantic slave trade." Route available from Museum Shop, City Museum & Art Gallery, Queen's Road, Bristol.

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September 6, 2006 - Peace Garden for Charlene and Letisha, St. George's Centre, Birmingham (England). "Seventeen-year-old Letisha Shakespeare and 18-year-old Charlene Ellis were caught in the crossfire between rival gangs as they were enjoying a New Year's Party on Thursday, 2nd January 2003, in the Aston area of the city." Photo shows mosaic in the garden.

September 22, 2006 - Atom Panopticon, Wycoller, Pendle (England). Bronze-coated GRC (Glass Reinforced Concrete) structure designed by Peter Meacock with Katarina Novomestska of Peter Meacock Projects. Provides both a striking contemporary viewing point & shelter from which to enjoy the stunning surrounding landscape." Near Pendle Hill (qv).

March 25, 2007 - Wilberforce House, High Street, Kingston upon Hull (England). "Birthplace of William Wilberforce [1759-1833], the famous abolitionist & MP who was most influential in the abolition of slavery, which became his life's work. Like the nearby Blaydes House & Maister House, formerly a Merchant's house with access to quayside on the River Hull. Part of Hull's Museum Quarter incorporating the Nelson Mandela garden (qv). Now a museum which re-opened on 25 March 2007 after a two-year £1.6 million redevelopment, in time for the 200th anniversary of Wilberforce's Act of Parliament abolishing the slave trade in the British Empire. The new exhibition has a broad focus on the history of slavery in addition to materials relating to the life & work of Wilberforce. The front garden contains a statue of Wilberforce which underwent a £10,000 restoration to preserve it in 2011. Adjoining the site is the University of Hull's Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery & Emancipation which conducts research into historic & contemporary forms of slavery."

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August 22, 2007 - International Slavery Museum, Liverpool (England). Has three main galleries: Life in West Africa, Enslavement and the Middle Passage, and Legacies of Slavery. One of only 4 "musuems for peace" in the UK (vs. about 70 in the USA).


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November 23, 2008 - National Sikh Heritage Centre & Holocaust Museum, Princes Street, Pear Tree, Derby (England). "A modern, packed, multi-channel museum with real artefacts that allow the visitor to appreciate the rich and complex heritage of the Sikhs in a story of courage, sacrifice and bloody genocide." "One hopes we will see similar initiatives in the US and Canada."


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December 6, 2008 - Plaque honoring Norman Angell, The Peace Museum, Bradford (England). Unveiled by the lord mayor of Bradford. Location #26 on the Bradford Peace Trail (qv). Sir Norman Angell [1872-1967] received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1933. Right image is Angell's birthplace at 45 High Street, Holbeach, Lincolnshire (now the Mansion House Hotel).

2009


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2009? - Peace House, 19 Paradise Street, Oxford (England). Headquarters of Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR). Mary Dobbing, QPSW Peaceworker. "Due to unforeseen circumstances we have had to cancel the Opening of Peace House due to take place on 15 October, 2008. We will arrange a suitable event at a later date to celebrate the new Centre which is proving so useful."


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Date? - Desmond Tutu House, 2 Lower Ashgrove, Bradford, Yorkshire (England). Owned by Yorkshire Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND)


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May 22, 2009 - Sculpture of Books, Bonn Square, Oxford (England). "A sculpture in bronze by Diana Bell. Presented to Oxford by the City of Bonn... Shows two piles of books: Some of the spines of the taller pile have KNOWLEDGE, TRUST, FRIENDSHIP, UNDERSTANDING engraved on them, while the smaller pile has the German equivalents: WISSEN, VERTRAUEN, FREÜNDSCHAFT, VERSTANDIGUNG. Uunveiled by the Lord Mayor of Oxford Mary Clarkson & Bezirksbürgermeister of Bonn Helmut Kollig." Info courtesy of Peter van den Dungen October 13, 2016.

July 3, 2009-Sept. 20, 2010 - "Flailing Trees," Manchester Peace Garden, Manchester (England). "By Gustav Metzger. 21 willow trees, stripped of branches, turned upside down & set in concrete. At the end of the Manchester International Festival it is due to be moved to the Whitworth Art Gallery. The sculpture is meant to represent man's desecration of the environment, making it impossible for living things to survive. Interestingly though, willow being what it is, at least one of the trees has survived the process, and there are green shoots sprouting along the trunk. I don't think this is intentional, but it adds an interesting irony to the sculpture."


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July 14, 2009 - Desmond Tutu Peace Garden, Chinbrook Meadows Park, Chinbrook Road, Grove Park, Lewisham, North Kent (England). Archbishop Desmond Tutu lived in Grove Park in the 1970's & received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984. In 1972 Tutu was appointed vice-director of the Theological Education Fund of the World Council of Churches at Bromley in Kent. He returned to South Africa in 1975 & was appointed Anglican Dean of St. Mary's Cathedral in Johannesburg -- first African to hold that position. He will dedicate the park, & schoolchildren will read messages of peace & perform traditional African songs during a 90-minute ceremony.

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September 21, 2009 - Leeds Peace Trail, Leeds (England). Nineteen peace sites, including Mandela Gardens, Mayors for Peace Monument & Nuclear Test Veterans' Memorial Stone (qv). Presented in a 32-panel old-out brochure (of which one side is the map shown in the image). Supported by Leeds City Council, Together for Peace (T4P), and The Peace Museum (of Bradford, England).

2010-2011


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February 13, 2010 - People's History Museum, on the Left Bank in Spinningfields, Manchester (England). "Derives its origin from the Trade Union, Labour & Co-operative History Society. From the 1960's the society formed a small collection & between 1975 & 1986 ran a museum in Limehouse Town Hall in London. The museum re-opened in 1990, initially at 103 Princess Street in Manchester. In May 1994 new museum galleries were opened in the Edwardian Pump House on Bridge Street. In October 2007 the museum closed to the public to allow for the start of a multi-million pound re-development scheme. A bigger & better People’s History Museum re-opened on 13 February 2010." /// From Peter van den Dungen 20Jan2012: "The museum is mainly about the growth of universal suffrage; right to unionise; growth of welfare state, etc.). One of the original artefacts is the desk on which Tom Paine wrote 'The Rights of Man.' Also a 1790's painting of Mary Wollstonecraft ('A vindication of the rights of women')." Click here for video. Click here for another video. N.B.: Sculpture in front of the museum is "Doves of Peace" designed by Michael Lyons in 1986 to commemorate Manchester as the World's first nuclear free city."

May 14, 2010 - Mural, "The New Picket," Liverpool (England). "On my arty travels last night, I came across The Picket which I knew had moved, but not to just off Jamaica Street. I went back today to take a photograph of this marvellous & detailed mural. Painted by Belfast Loyalist Mark Ervine & Republican artist Danny Devenny with the help of local community groups. Characters on the mural include Kitty Wilkinson [1786-1860], champion of the poor who set up wash houses for all in the city, & Irish born Agnes Jones [1832-1868], who made an outstanding contribution to nursing, becoming the first trained Nursing Superintendent at Liverpool's Workhouse Infirmary. Her work for the sick paupers was enormous, but took its toll as she died at the age of just 35 from typhus fever. The mural is a true work of art, which many probably missed last night. I didn't go in but I hope the atmosphere is still the same as the old Picket which was always a welcoming place to debate your politics without fear of recrimination. Long live the Picket." /// "2011 marks 25 years since Pete Townshend officially opened the recording studio at the Merseyside Unemployed Resource Centre, which would later become known as the Picket. The legendary Liverpool venue has been supported by a string of some of Britain’s most famous musicians from Elvis Costello, Paul McCartney & Yoko Ono to Paul Weller, Peter Gabriel & Suggs from Madness."


September 2010 - Statue of Sir Nicholas Winton, Railway Station, Maidenhead (England). "The 101-year-old Rotarian joined members of his club at the unveiling of a life-size statue in his honor. The bronze work by Maidenhead sculptor Lydia Karpinska shows Sir Nicholas sitting on a bench reading a book. The book depicts images of nearly 700 children - most of them Jewish – who he helped to flee from Prague (Czechoslovakia) to Britain on eight kindertransport trains between 13 March & 2 August 1939, ahead of the Nazi invasion. A ninth train with 250 children was due to depart on the day war was declared, 3 September 1939. None of those children survived."


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September 21, 2010 - Peace Plaque, New Road Baptist Church, Bonn Square, Oxford (England). Veteran peace campaigner Bruce Kent unveiled a plaque to promote the message of peace. It reads: "Peace – to honour those who seek another path in place of violence and war." David Partridge, an inter-faith worker in Oxford and retired priest, said the plaque had been a long time in the planning. Mr Partridge said: “The idea started back in 2003 after the invasion of Iraq, when lots of people around Oxford in small groups protested against the war. “We wanted to commemorate that and show people there is another way.” Mr Partridge hoped the plaque would stay there to promote peace for a long time.


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October 9, 2010 - John Lennon Peace Monument, Liverpool (England). "18-foot monument by by 19-year-old American artist Lauren Voiers. Unveiled by Lennon’s son Julian as part of Liverpool's two-month season of events commemorating the former Beatle’s 70th birthday and 30th anniversary of his murder. Second of a series of monuments commissioned by California-based organisation Global Peace Initiative. (The first monument was by Romanian artist Alexandra Nechita and was presented to Singapore on behalf of the people of Asia in 2005.) Presented to The Beatles Story, which came up with the idea of a landmark in Liverpool, and sited in a prominent city centre location yet to be agreed."

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November 4, 2010 - Manchester City Centre Peace & Social Justice Trail, Manchedster (England). Begins in a site close to Manchester Piccadilly Train Station & ends in the centre of Piccadilly Gardens. (A separate Children’s Trail is also available for schools to use.) Seventeen highlights: 1. Remembering the Depression (e.g. " Unemployed of the 1930's" Red plaque in London Road). 2. Campaign for tolerance & fairness for gay rights (e.g. Alan Turing memorial statue). 3. Education origins & founding of the Trade Union movement (e.g. Mechanics Institute). 4. An international city open to all (e.g. Friendship Arch). 5. Manchester – a true ‘City of Peace’ (e.g. Manchester Peace Gardens). 6. Learning for all – the Central Library. 7. We shall remember them – the city war memorial (Manchester Cenotaph). 8. The Free Trade Hall & Peterloo – a centre of dissent and discontent. 9. Citadel for peace – the Friends Meeting House. 10. Manchester Town Hall – the neo-Gothic masterpiece. 11. John Bright [1811-1889] – radical MP and peace campaigner (e.g. statue of John Bright). 12. A city of religious tolerance (e.g. St. Mary’s Church). 13. Campaigning for justice elsewhere – Manchester leads the way (e.g. Abraham Lincoln statue). 14. Votes for Women! (e.g. Elliot House & Pankhurst Centre). 15. Workers of the World Unite! (e.g. People’s History Museum [2010]). 16. Chronicler of the very poor – Elizabeth Gaskell [1810-1865] & Manchester (e.g. Cross Street Unitarian Chapel). 17. Slavery, Guernica and reconstruction – Medieval Manchester (e.g. Manchester Cathedral). 17. Home of the Co-op – a worldwide movement (e.g. Robert Owen [1771-1858]). 18. Peace Trees in Piccadilly.

2012


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February 1, 2012? - Peace Doves, opposite Peace Gardens, St. Paul's Parade, Sheffield (England). "Stainless steel sculpture by Sheffield artist Richard Bartle. Features seven life-size doves perched on chimney of Bar Ha!Ha! (now Browns Bar & Brasserie) next to the Peace Gardens. Inspired by Pablo Picasso’s visit to the Second World Peace Congress held in Sheffield in 1950. Pablo Picasso [1881-1973] arrived at Sheffield Midland railway station carrying a bouquet of chrysanthemums & wearing an old raincoat & blue beret. He was welcomed by members of the local communist party, the press & the public, and taken on a tour of the city. He ate a bacon sandwich at Thorpe's cafe in Fargate; had his hair trimmed at Peckitt's barbers, and drew a 'dove of peace' on a napkin in Butler’s Dining Rooms. The Congress was to be a special debate on the Korean War, but the Government at the time refused to allow important speakers into the country, & it was abandoned. Picasso gave a short speech, recalling that he had learnt to paint doves from his father, and ending by saying 'I stand for life against death; I stand for peace against war.' Later whilst returning to London he drew another Dove of Peace on a napkin, which he gave to the bodyguard who had accompanied him around the city. This drawing is now part of Sheffield Galleries & Museums Trust’s collection and is now on permanent display at Weston Park Museum. Richard Bartle has used the original poster [from 1949], designed by Picasso, as a template to create the sculpture, in celebration of the memory of Picasso and the cause of peace that he introduced into an already radically thinking Sheffield..."


July 19-22, 2012 - Peace Camps, United Kingdom. "As the pageantry, athleticism & rampant commercialism of the Olympic Games comes [sic] to London, a collaboration between the theatre director Deborah Warner, the actor Fiona Shaw & the creative events company Artichoke, put up tent encampments in eight coastal areas of outstanding beauty, including Cemaes Bay in Anglesey, Mussenden Temple in County Londonderry, Dustanburgh Castle in Northumberland & Fort Fiddes in Aberdeenshire. The tents...glow from within, accompanied by a soundtrack created by the composer Mel Mercier from the sounds of nature, & British love poetry in languages & dialects of the UK & Ireland. According to Warner, the idea for Peace Camp was sparked by hearing of the Olympic truce, when all nations receive the call to 'lay down your arms, and let the games commence.'"

2013

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2013 - Birmingham Peace Trail, Birmingham (England). Organized by Barbara Panvel. "Will soon be sent to the printer" (07Mar13). Information courtesy of Peter van den Dungen. Image shows the St. Thomas' Peace Garden in Birmingham.

2014

Date? 2014 - Memorial plaque, near the People's Palace, Glasgow Green, Glasgow (Scotland). Inscription: "In memory of those who opposed World War One in order to challenge the purpose of the war and the waste of lives. /// They also campaigned for social and economic justice and against the exploitation of those who lived in the city [of Glasgow] during the war." ("During World War I, the anti-war movement held mass demonstrations on the Green. In September 1914, John Maclean held his first anti-war rally under [Admiral Horatio] Nelson's monument [43.5 metres tall, erected in 1806]. The Military Service Act of 1916, led to a rally on the Green, which resulted in 12 months imprisonment for the three lead speakers under the DORA. On 29 June 1916, David Lloyd George was invited to receive the freedom of the city, which led to mass protests on the Green. In May 1917, workers marched through Glasgow to the Green in support of Russia's February Revolution. Another result of World War I, was increased migration to the city of munitions workers. The resulting rent increases led to protests on the Green in 1920.") Information courtesy of Peter van den Dungen.

October 3, 2014 - "Let There Be Peace," Creative Arts Building, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire (England). Poem by Lemn Sissay [b. 1967], "award-wining British author of Ethiopian origin & Chancellor at the University of Manchester... Inside the University of Manchester, his poem 'Let There be Peace' stands high on the walls at University Place on Oxford Road..." /// Click here for text of the poem. /// Information courtesy of Peter van den Dungen.

December 12, 2014 - "Football Remembers," National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire (England). "A memorial to the World War One Christmas Truce, when some British & German soldiers stopped fighting & played football, has been dedicated by the Duke of Cambridge. The memorial was designed by 10-year-old Spencer Turner from Farne Primary [School] in Newcastle after a UK-wide competition." /// "The Duke of Cambridge & England forward Theo Walcott picked out the memorial's design from thousands of entries in a competition held in schools throughout the UK. Prince William told guests attending the dedication ceremony: 'We all grew up with the story of soldiers from both sides putting down their arms to meet in no man's land on Christmas Day 1914 – when gunfire remarkably gave way to gifts. It remains wholly relevant today as a message of hope and humanity, even in the bleakest of times. Football, then as now, had the power to bring people together and break down barriers.'"

2015

2015? - Institute for Democracy and Conflict Resolution (IDCR), University of Essex, Essex (England). "World-renowned architect Daniel Libeskind has been chosen to design a landmark building in the UK to house a new international institute working towards democracy and conflict resolution around the globe. The new Institute for Democracy and Conflict Resolution (IDCR) at the University of Essex will build on the University’s 40 years of practical and academic expertise in the field of human rights, justice and governance, and become an international beacon for democracy. It will be the largest purpose-built institute for independent research and policy analysis in these areas, drawing on Essex’s experience as the top ranked University in the UK for social science research. Daniel Libeskind, who won the competition to design the master plan for the new World Trade Center site in New York, has designed the Jewish Museum in Berlin, the Imperial War Museum North in Manchester, and the Danish Jewish Museum in Copenhagen. He received a Master’s degree in the history and theory of architecture at the University of Essex in the 1970s..."


October 27, 2016 - Gilded Scroll of Abolition, Wilberforce Monument (qv), Hull (England). "Held in William Wilberforce’s right hand on top of the monument... The scroll was double gilded in 23.5 carat gold leaf that will last throughout this century & into the next, seeing out the tercentenary of abolition! This continues to create a talking point as more people notice the glint of gold, raising the profile of the efforts of all those involved in the abolition movement & bringing prominence to the most important aspect of the story..." SLAVERY

Future


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Future - Earth Pyramid, Leeds, West Yorkshire (England). Formerly called the Leeds Pyramid. "I am currently working on a project to create a global peace structure. The aim is to create a global time capsule that every nation and an entire generation of the world's children can contribute to. We currently have 19 governments wishing to participate, [and] 6 more have shown interest, and we have also received the support of 2 Nobel Peace laureates -- President Jose Horta and Archbishop Tutu. During 2011, we will be changing the name of the project to the Earth pyramid." Email from Steve Ward 25Jan11.


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Future - Peace Garden, Gatehouse Drive, Carmelite Monastery, Aylesford (England). "Will feature tiles containing the word 'peace' in more than 250 languages and Zimbabwean sculptures made from recycled oil drums. Will contain five individual gardens on the three themes of fire, wind, and earth/water, each containing different types of plants and features."

Future - Quaker Memorial, National Memorial Arboretum, Staffordshire (England). "The idea is coming closer to reality. The Quaker Service Memorial trustees are looking to extend their number beyond the present four appointed by Staffordshire Area Meeting, at the same time as we build up our fundraising appeal beyond the £22,000 raised so far. The memorial should be completed in twelve months’ time, when the outreach programme will begin." [From "the Friend," September 1, 2011] /// N.B. "There are over 150 memorials and plots in the arboretum for the armed forces, civilian organisations & voluntary bodies who have played a part in serving the country. A number of corporate war memorials - from British banks, building societies & insurance companies - are also located in the grounds. At the heart of the arboretum is the Armed Forces Memorial, which is a tribute to almost 16,000 service personnel who have lost their lives in conflict or as a result of terrorism since the end of the Second World War."

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