Please email your comments & questions to geovisual at comcast.net. Thank you.

70 Peace Monuments in
Kentucky & Tennessee (USA)

Right click image to enlarge.

H
O
U
S
E
1820 - Home of Elihu Embree [1782-1820], 142 Matthews Mill Road, Telford, Tennessee (USA). About 6 miles west of Jonesborough. Unintentional monument. Constructed about 1791. Was a hiding place for runaway slaves. Originally faced north. Upper image shows porch added to south side. Lower image shows basement once occupied by slaves. Privately owned.

M
A
R
K
E
R
Date? - "Thomas Embree Marker," Highway 353, near Telford, Washington County, Tennessee (USA). Points to home of Elihu Embree. Photo by EWL 05July2015. /// Lower image is "The Emancipator" (with introduction by Ella Pearce Buchanan & John F. Nash), Embreeville Publications, Jonesborough (1995), which contains reprints of Embree's newspaper.

M
A
R
K
E
R
Date? - "First Abolitionist Publications" marker, Jonesborough, Tennessee (USA). Honors Quaker Elihu Embree [1782-1820] who published the first newspaper in the USA dedicated entirely to the abolition of slavery. /// Lower image is grave of Elihu Embree, Embree Family Cemetery in Jonesborough. Embree died at age 38. Cemetery is "very overrun but can be walked."

C
O
M
M
U
N
E
1825-1828 - Nashoba Community, Wolf River, Germantown, near Memphis, Tennessee (USA). No longer exsits. Short-lived experiment of reformer Frances (Fanny) Wright [1795-1852] to train slaves for freedom. Click here for history of Wright, General LaFayette, New Harmony, Robert Dale Owen, etc.
M
A
R
K
E
R
1950's - Nashoba Marker, Germantown, near Memphis, Tennessee (USA). The Nashoba Community was founded by Frances (Fanny) Wright [1795-1852], "a Scottish-born lecturer, writer, freethinker, feminist, abolitionist & social reformer, who became a US citizen in 1825, the same year she founded Nashoba as a utopian community to prepare slaves for emancipation, intending to create an egalitarian place, but it lasted only three years."

G
R
A
V
E
After 1852 - Grave of Frances Wright, Spring Grove Cemetery, 4521 Spring Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, Hamilton County Ohio 45232 (USA). "Wright's 'Views of Society & Manners in America' (1821) brought her the most attention as a critique of the new nation." Fanny did many remarkable things: She visited Monticello with the Marquis de Lafayette, lived in New Harmony, Indiana, lectured in New York City, published a newspaper in Cincinatti, freed slaves in Haiti, bore one child out of wedlock & lived at La Grange, LaFayette's estate near Paris (France).

C
O
L
L
E
G
E
M
A
R
K
E
R
1848 - Burritt College, Spencer, Van Buren County, Tennessee (USA). Closed in 1939, but at least one building is still used by county government. "Founders chose the name of Elihu Burritt [1810-1879] because they admired the initiative, perseverance & determination which characterized Burritt's rise to national prominence. While there was not an overwhelming amount of pacifistic sentiment within the Church of Christ, there was nevertheless a sufficient amount for the small band of Christians in the isolated village of Spencer to know of the life and work of one of the outstanding leaders in the peace movement. Generally the Church of Christ followed the pattern set by other religious groups in questions such as war & slavery."

G
R
A
V
E
M
E
M
O
R
I
A
L
1879 - Grave of Elihu Burritt, Fairview Cemetery, New Britain, Hartford County, Connecticut (USA).

1916 - Elihu Burritt Memorial, 111 Franklin Square, Sister City Plaza, New Britain, Connecticut (USA). Says "Peace and Universal Brotherhood." Sculpted by Robert Aitken [1878-1949]. Restored in 2000.

S
T
A
T
U
E
M
E
M
O
R
I
A
L
August 13, 1908 - Elihu Burritt Memorial, The Green, New Marlborough, Massachusetts (USA). Inscribed "'The Learned Blacksmith.' Linguist and Apostle of Peace. Organizer of 'the League of Universal Brotherhood.' Author of the "Congress of Nations.' Advocate of low rate ocean postage. Followed his trade and studied at the Forge in New Marlboro 1821-1833."


F
A
I
R
1897 - Negro Building, Tennessee Centennial Exposition (now Centennial Park), Nashville, Tennessee (USA). No longer exists. "Largest-ever display of African-American life and achievement." From dedication speech: "Here...the world may see the other side of Negro life than 'Sam Johnson, the chicken thief.' Here it may see the healthful buds of Negro handicraft, Negro art, science, literature, invention... Here... the old master who followed Lee's tattered banners... down to Appomattox sacrifices his pro-slavery ideas, and builds a monument to Negro fidelity and industry; and here the Negro brings the product of his brain and hand in grateful testimony to the friendly feelings between us."


F
A
I
R
1897 - Woman's Building, Tennessee Centennial Exposition (now Centennial Park), Nashville, Tennessee (USA). No longer exists. Site (near the fair's full-scale reproduction of the Parthenon) is marked by a subsequent monument with a sphere on top. Its plaque contains two quotations by Mrs. Van Leer (Kate) Kirkman, President, Woman's Department: "That that is round can be no rounder" and "Women's Work. Whatever may be necessary to preserve the sanctity of the home and ensure the freedom of the state." Right image by EWL.
1867 - Haystack Monument, Mission Park, Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts (USA). Commemorates the 1806 meeting which started the American foreign missions movement.


P
A
R
K
Circa 1908 - "Peace Park," Hopkinsville, Kentucky (USA). Entire block in central Hopkinsville near railroad station. Park is bequest by Hopkinsville native John C. Latham [1845-1908] of New York, whose large tobacco warehouse on this site was destroyed by disgruntled tobacco growers (Night Raiders) on December 8, 1907. Identified by Kentucky state historical marker. Click here for web page showing showing this to be one of the earliest "peace parks" anywhere in the world.


M
A
R
K
E
R
July 2, 1908 - Holston Treaty Marker, Criminal Court Building, Courthouse Square, 300 West Main Street, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). Erected by Sons of the American Revolution (SAR).

S
C
U
L
P
T
U
R
E
About 1998 - Holston Peace Treaty Monument, Treaty of Holston Park, Volunteer Landing Park, Tennessee River at mouth of First Creek, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). Depicts 3 whites & 5 Native Americans (3 men, 1 woman & 1 child). Designed by Raymond Kaskey & carved by Malcolm S. Harlow, Jr. (Inscribed "© Kaskey 1997.") Treaty of Holston Park is a small park on the east side of the Volunteer Landing parking lot. "The Treaty of Holston was signed [on the treaty ground on the bank of the Holston River, near the mouth of the French Broad River] on July 2, 1791, by William Blount [1749-1800], governor [of] the territory of the USA south of the Ohio River & superintendent of Indian affairs for the southern district for the USA, and by 41 representatives of the Cherokee Nation." (Click here for the text of the treaty.) "After concluding the treaty, Blount announced that the territorial capital would move to newly founded Knoxville" (a short distance downstream). Click here for panorama of the monument & river. Not to be confused with marker erected July 2, 1908, by Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) on Courthouse Square.


1910 - New York Peace Monument, Point Park, Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA). Statues at peak are soldiers from North & South shaking hands. Erected by State of New York. 1 of 40 monuments in "Peace Symbols" by Zonia Baber (1948), pp. 46-47. Date? - 79th New York Infantry Monument, 17th Street, Fort Sanders, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). At Masonic Hall. Memorializes Battle of Fort Sanders. Also depicts soldiers from North & South shaking hands. Any connection to the them of the far laerger monument at Lookout Mountain? Inscription: "The hands that once were raised in strife / Now clasp a brother's hand. / And long as flows the tide of life - / In peace, in toil, when war is rife - / we shall as brothers stand. / One heart one soul for our free land. / J.J.C. Clarke."

1911 - Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site, National Park Service (NPS), 2995 Lincoln Farm Road, Hodgenville, Kentucky (USA). A Beaux-Arts neo-classical memorial building designed by John Russell Pope [1874-1937]. Cornerstone laid in 1909 by President Theodore Roosevelt. Building dedicated in 1911 by President William Howard Taft. A reconstructed log cabin is inside the shrine. Another resconstruced cabin is outdoors at the Knob Creek Unit of the historic site. Click here for other Lincoln monuments.


1917 - Ohio Peace Monument, Cravens House, Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA). Base of monument depicts a female figure surrounded with grain, machinery & other fruits of peace. Click here for other Civil War peace monuments. Erected by State of Ohio.


S
C
U
L
P
T
1923 - World War I Memorial, Centennial Park, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Faces West End Avenue, near the 25th Avenue entrance to the park. Also called the Kiwanis Memorial & the Gold Star Monument. "A sculpture group in bronze by Julian Zolnay of Palermo (Italy). On the marble pedestal two tablets are inscribed with the names of Davidson County's World War dead. The Roumanian [sic] Government obtained permission to reproduce this memorial. [From 'Tennessee: A Guide to the State,' Nashville section, pgs. 195-196]... Restored and and refurbished in 1967. Front inscription: 'I Gave My Best / To Make A Better World, 1917-1918.' Back inscription: 'Erected by the Citizens Of Davidson County Tennessee, 1923, Nashville Kiwanis Sponsor." /// George Julian Zolnay [1863-1949] - seen in right image - was "a Hungarian & American sculptor, [was] called 'the sculptor of the Confederacy' & made the pedimental sculptures on Nashville's 1897 Parthenon."


D
O
L
L
1927 - "Miss [name unnown]," somewhere in Tennessee (USA). One of 58 Japanese Friendship Dolls. Dr. Sidney Gulick [1860-1945], an American lecturer at Kyoto Imperial University, obtained more than 12,000 American “blue-eyed dolls” for Japanese children. Fifty-eight prefectures replied by sending museum quality Japanese dolls to America, one of which was distributed to each state. Many were hidden during World War II, but 45 have been found (mostly restored & now displayed in museums), and 13 remain missing, including Tennessee's doll. Image shows Miss Okayma" in Fargo, North Dakota.


M
O
N
U
M
E
N
T
November 11, 1927 - Peace Monument, Battlefield Drive & Granny White Pike, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Angel of Peace at top. Lower group depicts a youth (the united nation) reigning in two powerful horses (North & South) under a rainbow of peace. Designed by Italian Giuseppe Moretti [1857-1935] most famous for Vulcan in Birmingham, Alabama (1904). Originally dedicated on Armistice Day 1927. Rededicated in 1999 after being moved from original base which was encroached by a modern expressway. The 1927 & 1999 bases are identical with the same three inscriptions: Text #1: "The spirit of youth holds in check the contending forces that struggled here in the fierce Battle of Nashville, December 16th, 1864, sealing forever the bond of union by the blood of our heroic dead of the World War 1917-1918." Text #2 from Ralph Waldo Emerson [1803-1882]: "A monument like this, standing on such memories, having no reference to utilities, becomes a sentiment, a poet, a prophet, an orator, to every passerby." Text #3 is a poem by state librarian John Trotwood Moore [1858-1929]. Entry #934 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001).


H
I
G
H
W
A
Y
1935 - Cordell Hull Highway, Kentucky & Tennessee (USA). "In 1935 [sic], the Kentucky & Tennessee legislatures designated the route connecting Mammoth Cave & the Great Smoky Mountain National Park in honor of Cordell Hull [1871-1955] as a tribute to his services to the nation. Hull, a Tennessee native of Pickett County, had a successful law practice in nearby Celina, Gainesboro & Carthage, Tennessee. He was a member of the House of Representatives 1907-31 & served many years as a US Senator beginning in 1931. As Secretary of State under Franklin D. Roosevelt, Hull became known universally as 'The Father of the United Nations,' an achievement for which he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945." /// "The Cordell Hull Parkway is a 57 mile ribbon of road that threads through a most scenic & historical route from Mammoth Cave, KY, to the Tennessee state line." /// "The Cordell Hull Scenic Byway begins at the entrance to Mammoth Cave National Park, extends to the Tennessee state line & on to Celina, Tennessee, which is the site of Hull’s original office." /// Click here for information on the annual Rollercoaster Yard Sale on the Cordell Hull Highway (right map).

P
A
R
K
September 2, 1940 - Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP), Tennessee & North Carolina (USA). 814 square miles (2,108 square kilometers) divided almost equally between the two states. Only US national park created entirely from privately owned land. Dedicated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Never called a "peace park" but meets all of the criteria of a "transfrontier conservtion area" (TFCA) as defined by the Peace Parks Foundation (PPF) or of a "transboundary protected area" (TBPA) as defined by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Click here for other peace parks.



N
O
B
E
L
December 10, 1945 - Nobel Peace Prize, Oslo (Norway). Awarded to Tennesseean Cordell Hull [1871-1955] who was unable to be present in Oslo for the award ceremony. "When WW-II ended in 1945, six years had already passed since the prize was last awarded. The International Committee of the Red Cross & the Red Cross organizations in Sweden & Norway were nominated for their wartime humanitarian efforts. Another nominee was American Secretary of State, Cordell Hull, primarily for his role in the planning of a new world organization, the United Nations. On November 27, 1944, the day Hull resigned from his post as US Secretary of State, former Norwegian Foreign Minister, adviser & Nobel Committee member Halvdan Koht, sent a letter to the committee containing a list of nominees: Cordell Hull, Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt & Josef Stalin." Click to enlarge lower left image which shows Philip Noel-Baker's nomination of Cordell Hull as written on a war ministry's letterhead.


M
U
R
A
L
1955 - “The Singing Mural,” Ballroom, University Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). By muralist Marion Greenwood [1909-1970]. Depicting the music, dance, and folklore of Tennessee from the Mississippi on the left to the Appalachians on the right. Minority students complained that the Black cotton picker is a slave. Mural vandalized on May 18, 1970. Has been covered since May 1972. Uncovered briefly March 15-17, 2006, when these photos were taken by the Knoxville News Sentinel. /// After the University Center was torn down, "The Singing Mural" was displayed in the UT Downtown Gallery in 2014 & later loaned to the Knoxville Museum of Art (KMOA) where it is now on semi-permanent display.


April 4, 1968 - Lorraine Motel, 450 Mulberry Street, Memphis, Tennessee (USA). Unintentional monument. Where Martin Luther King, Jr. [1929-1968] was killed. Motel sign & facade, King's room, his two cars & boarding house across the street from which the fatal shot was fired were preserved in 1991 as part of the National Civil Rights Museum (qv).


M
U
S
E
U
M
1972? - James F. Corn Interpretive Center, Red Clay State Historic Park, 1140 Red Clay Park Road SW, Bradley County, Tennessee (USA). Near the Georgia state line about 17 miles SE of Chattanooga. "Site of the last seat of Cherokee government before removal to Oklahoma in 1838... Features exhibits about 19th century Cherokee culture, government, economy, recreation, religion and history. A series of stained glass windows depicts the forced removal of the Cherokee and subsequent Trail of Tears emigration. Outside there is a replica of a Cherokee farmstead, a Council House," and the "Eternal Flame of the Cherokee Nation" [in image]. Named for author James F. Corn [1894-1989].


1974 - "Cherokee Chieftain" (Statue #9), Johnson Park, on Inman between Broad and Ocoee Streets, Cleveland, Tennessee (USA). Height 10 feet. Carved by Peter Wolf Toth whose "Trail of the Whispering Giants" has at least one Indian statue in every state.
1986 - "Junaluska" (Statue #55), Knob Creek & Guaranda Roads, Johnson City, Tennessee (USA). Height 16 feet. Carved by Peter Wolf Toth.

M
A
R
K
E
R
1976 - "United Nations Visit to Nashville" (historical marker), Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Text: "On June 7, 1976, 101 permanent representatives of the UN made a historic and unprecedented group visit to Nashville... [They] attended a forum at nearby Vanberbilt University, a special Tennessee luncheon in Centennial Park, and a special performance of the Grand Ole Opry. UN Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim [1918-2007] was presented the Cordell Hull Peace award [sic]... Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. No. 70. Erected 1976." Cordell Hull [1871-1955] received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945. President Roosevelt called Hull the "Father of the UN." Click here for monuments related to all Nobel Peace Prize laureates. Click here for monuments related to the United Nations.


M
U
S
E
U
M
1977 - Abraham Lincoln Library & Museum, Lincoln Memorial University (LMU), Harrogate, Tennessee (USA). "One of the most diverse Lincoln & Civil War collections in the country. Has many rare items - the cane Lincoln carried at Ford's Theatre, two life masks, the tea set he and Mary Todd used in their home in Springfield, and numerous other artifacts." Started in 1929 as a Lincoln collection in one room of Duke Hall. Made possible in 1974 by $500,000 from Colonel Harlan Sanders [1890-1980].



M
U
S
E
U
M
1978 - Alex Haley Boyhood Home & Museum (Alex Haley State Historic Site), 200 South Church Street, Henning, Tennessee (USA). "Built in 1919 by Will E. Palmer, the maternal grandfather of Alex Haley [1921-1992]. From 1921 to 1929, & during some subsequent summers, Haley lived here with his grandparents. It was on the porch of this house that Haley heard from his grandmother the family stories that inspired him to write Roots: The Saga of an Amerian Family, retelling tales of his African ancestors who were brought to America as slaves. The work won him the 1976 Pulitzer Prize, and the book was presented in an eight- part television adaptation in 1977. Haley is buried on the grounds" (lower right image). New interpretive center (lower left image) was opened in 2008.
M
A
R
K
E
R



T
O
W
E
R
May 31, 1982 - SunSphere, 1982 World's Fair, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). Theme structure of the 1982 World's Fair. Theme of the exposition was "Energy Turns the World." Click here for other peace towers.


M
U
S
E
U
M
1986 - Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, Vonore, Tennessee (USA). "A property of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI). Strives to promote the understanding and appreciation of the history of the Cherokee people." Sequoyah [c.1767-1843] was was a Cherokee silversmith who in 1821 completed his independent creation of a Cherokee syllabary, making reading and writing in Cherokee possible.


T
R
A
I
L
1987 - Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. "'Designated' in 1987. Commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward. Today the trail includes about 2,200 miles of land and water routes, and traverses portions of nine states (AL, AR, GA, KY, IL, MO, NC, OK & TN). The National Park Service (NPS) administers the trail through staff at an office in Santa Fe, New Mexico." Click here for "Places To Go" in each state." Click here for a number of historical markers along the eastern portion of the trail. Right image shows Pea Ridge, Arkansas.

S
T
A
T
U
E
June 24, 1990 - "Silent Witness" Memorial, Gander Lake, Gander, Newfoundland (Canada). Memorizes 256 victims who died December 12, 1985, when Arrow Air Flight 1285 crashed while transporting Multinational Force Observers (MFO's) from the Sinai via Cairo to Ft. Campbell, Kentucky. Depicts an unarmed soldier holding the hands of two civilian children, each with an olive branch of peace. Sculpted by Stephen Sheilds of Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
Date? - Arrow Air Flight 1285 Memorial, Ft. Campbell, Kentucky (USA).

1991 - Pyramid Arena, Memphis, Tennessee (USA). Sixth largest pyramid in the world behind the Great Pyramid of Giza (456 ft), Khafre's Pyramid (448 ft), Luxor Hotel (348 ft), the Red Pyramid (341 ft) and the Bent Pyramid (332 ft), both in Dahshur.


M
U
S
E
U
M
September 28, 1991 - National Civil Rights Museum (NCRM), Memphis, Tennessee (USA). Includes sign, facade & balcony of Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Lobby contains World Peace Flame from the Netherlands (qv). Click here for the Wikipedia article. Entry #932 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001). Described on pages 321-322 of "A Traveller's Guide to the Civil Rights Movement" by Jim Carrier (2004). One of 27 US museums in "Museums for Peace Worldwide" edited by Kazuyo Yamane (2008). Visited by EWL.


September 28, 1991 - "Movement to Overcome" (Civil Rights Monument), National Civil Rights Museum (NCRM), Memphis, Tennessee (USA). Bronze sculpture constructed on site by Michael Pavlovsky. Visited by EWL.


M
U
R
A
L
Date? - World Wall for Peace (WWFP), Sevier Park Community Center, 12th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). One of several WWFP's sponsored by the World Wall for Peace organization in Berkeley, California (USA). Click here for other World Walls for Peace; nearest one is at Little Five Points, Atlanta, Georgia..


1995 - "Friendship Globe to the Children of the World," A.K. Bissell Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). Donated to the city by the Oak Ridge Breakfast Rotary Club (ORBRC).

1995 - "Votes for Women," Tennessee historical marker NHC 94, Capitol Boulevard at Union Street, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Text: " VOTES FOR WOMEN. On August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th [& last]state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, thereby giving all American women the right to vote. After weeks of intense lobbying by national leaders, Tennessee passed the measure by one vote. The headquarters for both suffragists, wearing yellow roses, & anti-suffragists, wearing red roses, were in the Hermitage Hotel. Donamed in mrmory of Carleen B. Waller. The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. No. 94. Erected 1995." /// PS: Carleen Batson Waller was a Nashville leader interested in public housing. She died in 1991. Commemorative plaque at right is probably at the Carleen Batson Waller Manor home for the elderly.


B
E
L
L
May 3, 1996 - International Friendship Bell, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Represents 50th anniversary of the City of Oak Ridge. Paid for in part by contributons by the people of sister city Naka-Machi (Japan). Only inscriptions on the bell are PEACE, INTERNATIONAL FRIENDSHIP, and the dates of Pearl Harbor, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and VJ Day. Bell cast by Sotetsu Iwazawa in Kyoto (Japan). Pavilion designed by Professor Jon Coddington. Click here for other peace bells.

M
U
S
E
U
M
June 1996 - Mary Todd Lincoln House & Beula C. Nunn Garden, 578 West Main Street, Lexington, Kentucky (USA). Bult c.1803-6 as an inn called 'The Sign of the Green Tree,' operated by William P. Monteer who sold the property to Mary Todd's father in May 1832. She was 13 years old when the Todds moved there, and this was her home until she left to live with her sister Elizabeth Edwards in Springfield, Illinois, in 1839." Click here for other Lincoln monuments.


P
L
A
Q
U
E
1997 - Women Suffrage Memorial, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). At Tennessee statehouse? Depicts Lizzy Crozier French of Knoxville, TN (speaking from a car, surrounded by inattentive men) with Tenneesee statehouse on hill in background. See 2006 monument in Knoxville & 2016 monument in Nashville, TN. 1997 Also by Alan LeQuire.

M
U
S
E
U
M
1997 - Cordell Hull Birthplace & Museum State Park, 1300 Cordell Hull Memorial Drive, Byrdstown, Tennessee (USA). Preserves Hull's birthplace and various personal effects Hull donated to the citizens of Pickett County, including his 1945 Nobel Peace Prize. Cordell Hull [1871-1955] was Secretary of State 1933-1944. President Roosevelt called hime the "Father of the United Nations." Click here for monuments to all Nobel Peace Prize laureates.



January 23, 1998 - Cherokee Removal Memorial Park, 6800 Blythe Ferry Lane, Birchwood, Meigs County, Tennessee (USA). "The Trail Where They Cried." Near Blythe Ferry where about 9,000 Cherokees crossed the Tennessee River in 1838 en route to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Includes pavilion (middle image) overlooking Blythe Ferry Goose Management Area & outdoor map (right image) of the Trail of Tears.


S
T
A
T
U
E
February 1998 - Alex Haley Statue, Alex Haley Heritage Square, Morningside Park, 1600 Dandridge Avenue, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). Child friendly 12 foot bronze statue of Pulitzer prize winner Alex Haley [1921-1992] who lived in nearby Clinton, Tennessee. Sculpted by Tina Allen [1950-2008], cast in bronze in NY City, and dedicated during Black History Month. In 1976 Haley published "Roots: The Saga of an American Family" which traced his origins back to Africa.


1999 - Langston Hughes Library, CDF Haley Farm, Children's Defense Fund (CDF), 1000 Alex Haley Lane, Clinton, Tennessee (USA). Conversion of old cantilevered barn into a modern library with memorial water table under the barn's overhang (of which no photo is available). Maya Lin also designed the nearby Riggio-Lynch Interfaith Chapel [far right]. Click here for all Maya Lin peace monuments.
July 18, 2004.


B
E
L
L
December 31, 1999 - World Peace Bell, Newport, Kentucky (USA) -- just across Ohio River from Cincinnatti, Ohio. World's largest free-swinging bell. Dedicated on the eve of the new millenium. Project begun by Wayne Carlisle (president of the Millenium Monument Company) & directed by Verdin Bell Company of Cincinnatti (which managed the bell's visitors center for several years). The visitors center was taken over c.2015 by Southbank Partners, Inc., a community & economic development organization. /// Bell is inscribed "The World Peace Bell is a symbol of freedom and peace, honoring our past, celebrating our present, and inspiring our future." Cast in Nantes (France) by Paccard Bell Foundry on December 11, 1998, the 50th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The Bell has an inscription commemorating that document, as well as engravings marking the most important events of the past 1,000 years." Not associated with World Peace Bell Association (Japan). Entry #355 in the "Peace Movement Directory" by James Richard Bennett (2001). Click here for air view. Click here for other peace bells.


H
E
A
D
May 2000 - "Beloved Woman of Justice," Howard Baker Jr. Federal Courthouse, 800 Market Street, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). By Audrey Flack of New York City. Originally named "Colossal Head of Justice" but renamed at suggestion of Chief Bird of the Cherokee Nation. Flack also created the controversial $400K "Lady Justice" for the George E. Edgecomb Courthouse in Tampa, Florida.


B
E
L
L
About 2000 - Peace Bell, Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance (OREPA), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). Portable bell made from war surplus oxygen tank. Used during protests at the Y-12 National Security Complex. Middle image shows Motoko Fujishiro Huthwaite (Moderator of Presbyterian Women, Presbytery of Detroit, Michigan) ringing on August 6, 2009 (Hiroshima Day). Right image shows the bell at Y-12 surrounded by anti-nuclear posters from Hiroshima.

S
T
A
T
U
E
October 20, 2001 - Kentucky Memorial, Kentucky Avenue, Vicksburg, Mississippi (USA). "Soldiers from Kentucky fought on both sides of the Battle. The Memorial is a statue of Presidents Lincoln and Davis (both Kentucky natives) with words from both of them calling for reconciliation between the North and South. At the start of the war Kentucky declared itself to be Neutral and only sided with Union after a Confederate invasion. Even so, the Conferdacy still had support there and was able to recruit soldiers both then and during a later invasion in 1862." Click here for other Civil War peace monuments. Built by State of Kentucky.


November 9, 2001 - Holocaust Maenmal der Kinder / Children's Holocaust Memorial, Whitwell Middle School, Whitwell, Marion County (near Chattanooga), Tennessee (USA). "An authentic German railcar filled with 11 million paper clips (6 million for murdered Jews & 5 million for Gypsies, homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses & other groups). Dedicated on the anniversary of Kristallnacht. A sculpture designed by an artist from Ooltewah, Tennessee, stands next to the car, memorializing the 1.5 million children murdered by the Nazis and incorporating another 11 million paper clips." Click here for other WW-II rail cars eingused as Holocaust monuments.


F
L
A
M
E
January-May 2002 - Hiroshima Flame Interfaith Peace Walk. From Seattle, Washington, via Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to the United Nations in New York, New York (USA). Click here for other peace flames.


June 9, 2002 - Twin Towers (9/11 Sculpture), American Museum of Science & Energy (AMSE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). 13-foot scale model of the twin towers at World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City welded from scrap metal by Alex Limor of Limor Steel in Nashville. Photo by EWL. Click here for other 9/11 monuments.

September 11, 2002 - Patriots Peace Memorial, River Road east of Zorn Avenue (next to Thurman-Hutchins Park), Louisville, Kentucky (USA).


F
L
A
M
E
September 27, 2002 - World Peace Flame (WPF #2), National Civil Rights Museum, Memphis, Tennessee (USA). At site of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s, assassination on April 4, 1968. Second of several WPF's sponsored by the World Peace Flame Foundation in Heteren (Netherlands). Original WPF is at the Peace Palace in The Hague (Netherlands). Click here for other peace flames. Photo by EWL.

S
T
A
T
U
E
July 2003 - "The Last Concert," World's Fair Park, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). 12-ft. bronze sculpture of the famous Russian born composer and pianist, Sergei Rachmaninoff [1873-1943]. Shows him as he appeared at what proved to be his final public concert held February 17, 1943, at the Alumni Gymnasium, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The concert included Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2, which contains the famous Marche funèbre / Funeral March. Sculpted by Victor Bokarev.


October 11, 2003 - "Musica," Roundabout, Music Row, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Features nine nude figures, male and female, dancing in a circular composition approximately 38 feet (11.5 m) tall. Largest sculpture commission to date for Nashville sculptor Alan LeQuire, and currently the largest sculpture group in the USA. Symbolizes Nashville's music business but expresses positive exuberence similar to some peace monuments, e.g. Constellation Earth in Nagasaki (Japan) & Bluffton, Ohio (USA).


S
T
A
T
U
E
April 2005 - Statue of William T.Sergeant (Rotary Centennial Sculpture), Krutch Park, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). A Knoxville Rotarian since 1947, "William T.Sergeant seems 'larger than life' because of his tireless efforts and steely resolve to eradicate polio during his lifetime. He was chair of the Intl. PolioPlus Committee (IPPC) 1994-2005. IPPC directs the efforts of the regional and national Polioplus committees and mobilizes hundreds of thousands of volunteers to support eradication efforts. The statue shows Sergeant in a familiar pose, administering polio vaccine to a child. " Sculpted by Hungarian artist Tajos Biro.

S
T
O
N
E
May 5, 2005 - Holocaust Memorial, West Hills/John Bynon Park, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). Sandstone monolith inscribed: "REMEMBER. This memorial is dedicated to the memory of the six million Jews and all others who perished in World War II during the Holocaust, 1939-1945, millions of whom were deliberately and systematically selected, transported and put in death camps by the Nazis and their allies. It will remind us to oppose evil wherever it exists. Honored here also are the brave servicemen who liberated those camps and lovingly cared for the survivors. Never forget... May 5, 2005" /// "The 14-acre park has baseball/softball fields, basketball courts, tennis courts, playgrounds, several picnic shelters/gazebos & picnic tables. The park also features a Holocaust Memorial & access to the Jean Teague Greenway. It is adjacent to the West Hills YMCA & West Hills Elementary School."


E
V
E
N
T
August 9, 2005 - Commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the non-use of nuclear weapons (60th anniversary of Nagasaki) at the International Friendship Bell, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). Led by Rev. R. Boyd Carter, Chapel on the Hill (far right). Attended by Dr. Alvin Weinberg (in wheelchair) and other nuclear scientists. Shikego Uppuluri plays the koto. Elise Campbell plays the flute.

P
O
L
E
Fall 2005 - Four-sided Peace Pole on driveway of a private home, George Williams Road, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). This pole has "May Peace Prevail on Earth" in English, Espagnol / Spanish, Français / French & Tsalagi / Cherokee. Photo by EWL. Click here for more information about peace poles.

M
U
S
E
U
M
November 19, 2005 - Muhammad Ali Center, Louisville, Kentucky (USA). Exhibits Ali's core values on respect, confidence, conviction, dedication, charity, and spirituality. "Hope and Dream" exhibit is composed of over 5,000 tiles with drawings and paintings from children from 141 countries, telling what they want to be when they grow up. The "Global Voices" exhibit asks questions to both children and adults from around the world with answers submitted through a variety of media, such as drawings and poems.


M
A
R
K
E
R
About 2006 - "Trail of Tears" historical marker, Ross's Landing Park & Plaza, Tennessee River, Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA). Marks the beginning of the Trail of Tears. Labeled "Alabama-Tennessee Trail of Tears Corridor Committee" and paid for by from proceeds of the Trail of Tears Commemorative Motorcycle Ride.

M
U
S
E
U
M
2006 - Green McAdoo Cultural Center & Museum, Clinton, Tennessee (USA). Celebrates the "Clinton 12," the first students to desegregate a state-supported high school in the South. Bronze sculpture by William F. (Bill) Duffy dedicated on May 17, 2007. See film by Oak Ridge film-maker Keith McDaniel.

S
T
A
T
U
E
August 26, 2006 - "Tennessee Woman Suffrage Memorial," Market Square, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA). Statues of Elizabeth Avery Meriwether [1824-1916] from Memphis, Lizzie Crozier French [1851-1926] from Knoxville & Anne Dallas Dudley [1876-1955] from Nashville. Sculpted by Alan LeQuire of Nashville, TN. On August 26, 1920, the Tennessee legislature ratified the 19th Amendment by a single vote, thus bringing suffrage to all women in the USA after many years' struggle by "suffragettes" such as the 3 leaders in this memorial. See 1997 plaque & 2016 monument in Nashville, TN.


October 22, 2006 - Nashville Holocaust Memorial, Gordon Jewish Community Center, 801 Percy Warner Boulevard, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Sculptor Alex Limor (whose parents were both holocaust survivors), Limor Steel, Nashville, created the memorial's centerpiece: A large bronze book with missing or tattered pages filled with silhouettes of nameless faces to represent the status of European Jewry. Also has memorial wall inscribed with the names of deceased Holocaust survivors and victims and an eternal flame. Two quotations on entrance panel: George Santayana [1863-1952]: Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Edmund Burke [1729-1797]: " All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.”


N
O
B
E
L
December 10, 2007 - Nobel Peace Prize, Oslo (Norway). Awarded to Tennesseean Al Gore [b. 1948] and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).


November 15, 2008 - Bell Tower, East Tennesse Veterans Memorial, World's Fair Park, Knoxville, Tennessee (USA) . 27-foot high. "On each of the four sides of the tower is inscribed one of the Four Essential Freedoms as enunciated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a speech to Congress on January 6, 1941 – freedom of speech and expression, freedom to worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear."

August 26, 2016 - Suffrage Monument, Centennial Park, Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Dedicated as part of Women's Equality Day. By Nashville sculptor Alan LeQuire. "Features five women who were actually in Nashville during the final ratification effort: Anne Dallas Dudley of Nashville; Frankie Pierce of Nashville; Sue Shelton White of Jackson; Abby Crawford Milton of Chattanooga, and Carrie Chapman Catt (the national suffrage leader who came to Nashville during the summer of 1920 to direct the pro-suffrage forces & stayed at the Hermitage Hotel)... Tennessee was the last state of the then 48 states that could possibly ratify the 19th Amendment which granted all American women the right to vote in 1920. Editorial cartoonists called the state 'The Perfect 36' since three-quarters of the states were necessary for ratification."


Future - Great Smoky Mountains Peace Pagoda, Newport, Tennessee (USA). Under construction by Atlanta Dojo, Nipponzan Myohoji. Right image shows the existing Teramori House & larger Forest House. Click here for speech delivered at the Ceremony for the Enshrinement of Sacred Relics on October 8, 2011.

August 1, 2014 - Construction volunteer Ralph Hutchison, Coordinator of Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance (OREPA), during concrete pouring for the Smoky Mountains Peace Pagoda while wearing a "Presente!" t-shirt he designed in 2000 for School of the Americas Watch protests at Fort Benning, Georgia.

September 2015 - Louisville Downtown Civil Rights Trail, Louisville, Kentucky (USA). "Eleven markers along Fourth Street, the city’s primary corridor of restaurants, department stores & theaters. Through the 1950's, most white-owned establishments downtown excluded African Americans or treated them differently as customers -- for example, denying them the opportunity to try on clothes, to sit at lunch counters & to enter movie theaters. By winter 1961, small-scale demonstrations & efforts to secure legislation opening all such facilities had failed. The stirrings of protest activity that swept the South in the 1960's inspired African American teenagers who became the 'foot soldiers' of the struggle against discrimination in public accommodations in Louisville. Mass student demonstrations in spring 1961, a voter registration drive & a campaign to unseat an unsympathetic mayor & elect a new board of aldermen ultimately led to the passage of the public accommodations ordinance -- the first such law in the South." /// This is "Monday's Monument" #101.

This is just one page from "Peace Monuments Around the World." To navigate the entire website:
EITHER click here for home page.
Then page down & choose a link

to one of more than 400 web pages.
OR enter name, location or other key words into this powered search engine:
Loading

Please email your comments & questions to geovisual @ comcast.net.
Click here to join Friends of Peace Monuments.